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Semantic context improves speech intelligibility and reduces listening effort for listeners with hearing impairment.
Int J Audiol. 2018 07; 57(7):483-492.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We investigated whether speech intelligibility and listening effort for hearing-aid users is affected by semantic context and hearing-aid setting.

DESIGN

Participants heard target sentences spoken in a reverberant background of cafeteria noise and competing speech. Participants reported each sentence verbally. Eight participants also rated listening effort after each sentence. Sentence topic was either the same as, or different from, the previous target sentence.

STUDY SAMPLE

Twenty participants with sensorineural hearing loss were fit binaurally with Signia receiver-in-the-canal hearing aids. Participants performed the task twice: once using the hearing aid's omnidirectional setting and once using the "Reverberant Room" setting, designed to aid listening in reverberant environments.

RESULTS

Participants achieved better speech intelligibility for same-topic than different-topic sentences, and when they used the "Reverberant Room" than the omnidirectional hearing-aid setting. Participants who rated effort showed a reliable reduction in listening effort for same-topic sentences and for the "Reverberant Room" hearing-aid setting. The improvement in speech intelligibility from semantic context (i.e. same-topic compared to different-topic sentences) was greater than the improvement gained from changing hearing-aid setting.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings highlight the enormous potential of cognitive (specifically, semantic) factors for improving speech intelligibility and reducing perceived listening effort in noise for hearing-aid users.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Brain and Mind Institute , University of Western Ontario , London , Canada.b National Centre for Audiology , University of Western Ontario , London , Canada , and.a Brain and Mind Institute , University of Western Ontario , London , Canada. c School of Communication Sciences and Disorders , University of Western Ontario , London , Canada.b National Centre for Audiology , University of Western Ontario , London , Canada , and. c School of Communication Sciences and Disorders , University of Western Ontario , London , Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29415585

Citation

Holmes, Emma, et al. "Semantic Context Improves Speech Intelligibility and Reduces Listening Effort for Listeners With Hearing Impairment." International Journal of Audiology, vol. 57, no. 7, 2018, pp. 483-492.
Holmes E, Folkeard P, Johnsrude IS, et al. Semantic context improves speech intelligibility and reduces listening effort for listeners with hearing impairment. Int J Audiol. 2018;57(7):483-492.
Holmes, E., Folkeard, P., Johnsrude, I. S., & Scollie, S. (2018). Semantic context improves speech intelligibility and reduces listening effort for listeners with hearing impairment. International Journal of Audiology, 57(7), 483-492. https://doi.org/10.1080/14992027.2018.1432901
Holmes E, et al. Semantic Context Improves Speech Intelligibility and Reduces Listening Effort for Listeners With Hearing Impairment. Int J Audiol. 2018;57(7):483-492. PubMed PMID: 29415585.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Semantic context improves speech intelligibility and reduces listening effort for listeners with hearing impairment. AU - Holmes,Emma, AU - Folkeard,Paula, AU - Johnsrude,Ingrid S, AU - Scollie,Susan, Y1 - 2018/02/07/ PY - 2018/2/9/pubmed PY - 2019/7/10/medline PY - 2018/2/9/entrez KW - Psychoacoustics/hearing science KW - behavioural measures KW - hearing aids KW - speech perception SP - 483 EP - 492 JF - International journal of audiology JO - Int J Audiol VL - 57 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether speech intelligibility and listening effort for hearing-aid users is affected by semantic context and hearing-aid setting. DESIGN: Participants heard target sentences spoken in a reverberant background of cafeteria noise and competing speech. Participants reported each sentence verbally. Eight participants also rated listening effort after each sentence. Sentence topic was either the same as, or different from, the previous target sentence. STUDY SAMPLE: Twenty participants with sensorineural hearing loss were fit binaurally with Signia receiver-in-the-canal hearing aids. Participants performed the task twice: once using the hearing aid's omnidirectional setting and once using the "Reverberant Room" setting, designed to aid listening in reverberant environments. RESULTS: Participants achieved better speech intelligibility for same-topic than different-topic sentences, and when they used the "Reverberant Room" than the omnidirectional hearing-aid setting. Participants who rated effort showed a reliable reduction in listening effort for same-topic sentences and for the "Reverberant Room" hearing-aid setting. The improvement in speech intelligibility from semantic context (i.e. same-topic compared to different-topic sentences) was greater than the improvement gained from changing hearing-aid setting. CONCLUSIONS: These findings highlight the enormous potential of cognitive (specifically, semantic) factors for improving speech intelligibility and reducing perceived listening effort in noise for hearing-aid users. SN - 1708-8186 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29415585/Semantic_context_improves_speech_intelligibility_and_reduces_listening_effort_for_listeners_with_hearing_impairment_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14992027.2018.1432901 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -