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Human coronavirus circulation in the United States 2014-2017.
J Clin Virol. 2018 04; 101:52-56.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) -OC43, -229E, -NL63 and -HKU1 cause upper and lower respiratory tract infections. HCoVs are globally distributed and the predominant species may vary by region or year. Prior studies have shown seasonal patterns of HCoV species and annual variation in species prevalence but national circulation patterns in the US have not yet been described.

OBJECTIVES

To describe circulation patterns of HCoVs -OC43, -229E, -NL63 and -HKU1 in the US.

STUDY DESIGN

We reviewed real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) test results for HCoV-OC43, -229E, -NL63 and -HKU1 reported to The National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) by U.S. laboratories from July 2014-June 2017. We calculated the total number of tests and percent positive by week. For a subset of HCoV positive submissions with age and sex of the patient available, we tested for differences in age and sex across the four HCoV species using Chi Square and Kruskal Wallace tests.

RESULTS

117 laboratories reported 854,575 HCoV tests; 2.2% were positive for HCoV-OC43, 1.0% for HCoV-NL63, 0.8% for HCoV-229E, and 0.6% for HCoV-HKU1. The percentage of positive tests peaked during December - March each year. No significant differences in sex were seen across species, although a significant difference in age distribution was noted.

CONCLUSIONS

Common HCoVs may have annual peaks of circulation in winter months in the US, and individual HCoVs may show variable circulation from year to year. Different HCoV species may be detected more frequently in different age groups. Further years of data are needed to better understand patterns of activity for HCoVs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA; Epidemic Intelligence Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA. Electronic address: lxo9@cdc.gov.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA.IHRC, Incorporated, Contracting agency to National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA.MAXIMUS Federal, Contracting agency to National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA.Influenza Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA.Division of Viral Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, 30333, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29427907

Citation

Killerby, Marie E., et al. "Human Coronavirus Circulation in the United States 2014-2017." Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, vol. 101, 2018, pp. 52-56.
Killerby ME, Biggs HM, Haynes A, et al. Human coronavirus circulation in the United States 2014-2017. J Clin Virol. 2018;101:52-56.
Killerby, M. E., Biggs, H. M., Haynes, A., Dahl, R. M., Mustaquim, D., Gerber, S. I., & Watson, J. T. (2018). Human coronavirus circulation in the United States 2014-2017. Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, 101, 52-56. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2018.01.019
Killerby ME, et al. Human Coronavirus Circulation in the United States 2014-2017. J Clin Virol. 2018;101:52-56. PubMed PMID: 29427907.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human coronavirus circulation in the United States 2014-2017. AU - Killerby,Marie E, AU - Biggs,Holly M, AU - Haynes,Amber, AU - Dahl,Rebecca M, AU - Mustaquim,Desiree, AU - Gerber,Susan I, AU - Watson,John T, Y1 - 2018/01/31/ PY - 2017/12/18/received PY - 2018/01/29/accepted PY - 2018/2/11/pubmed PY - 2019/6/15/medline PY - 2018/2/11/entrez KW - Coronavirus KW - Epidemiology KW - Respiratory tract infection KW - Respiratory virus SP - 52 EP - 56 JF - Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology JO - J Clin Virol VL - 101 N2 - BACKGROUND: Human coronaviruses (HCoVs) -OC43, -229E, -NL63 and -HKU1 cause upper and lower respiratory tract infections. HCoVs are globally distributed and the predominant species may vary by region or year. Prior studies have shown seasonal patterns of HCoV species and annual variation in species prevalence but national circulation patterns in the US have not yet been described. OBJECTIVES: To describe circulation patterns of HCoVs -OC43, -229E, -NL63 and -HKU1 in the US. STUDY DESIGN: We reviewed real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) test results for HCoV-OC43, -229E, -NL63 and -HKU1 reported to The National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) by U.S. laboratories from July 2014-June 2017. We calculated the total number of tests and percent positive by week. For a subset of HCoV positive submissions with age and sex of the patient available, we tested for differences in age and sex across the four HCoV species using Chi Square and Kruskal Wallace tests. RESULTS: 117 laboratories reported 854,575 HCoV tests; 2.2% were positive for HCoV-OC43, 1.0% for HCoV-NL63, 0.8% for HCoV-229E, and 0.6% for HCoV-HKU1. The percentage of positive tests peaked during December - March each year. No significant differences in sex were seen across species, although a significant difference in age distribution was noted. CONCLUSIONS: Common HCoVs may have annual peaks of circulation in winter months in the US, and individual HCoVs may show variable circulation from year to year. Different HCoV species may be detected more frequently in different age groups. Further years of data are needed to better understand patterns of activity for HCoVs. SN - 1873-5967 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29427907/Human_coronavirus_circulation_in_the_United_States_2014_2017_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1386-6532(18)30032-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -