Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies.
Adv Nutr 2018; 9(1):9-20AN

Abstract

An association between vitamin D and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been proposed by several researchers in recent years; however, the investigations have led to inconsistent results. The present study was conducted to summarize the published observational data on the relation between vitamin D status and the likelihood of ADHD. Online databases, including PubMed, the ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus, were checked up to June 2017 for relevant observational studies. A random-effects model was incorporated to summarize the study results. Out of 2770 retrieved articles, 13 observational studies (9 case-control or cross-sectional studies and 4 prospective studies) were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review and meta-analysis. Analysis of the 10,334 children and adolescents who attended the 9 case-control or cross-sectional studies revealed that children with ADHD have lower serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D than do healthy children (weighted mean difference: -6.75 ng/mL; 95% CI: -9.73, -3.77 ng/mL; I2 = 94.9%]. Five case-control studies reported the OR for developing ADHD based on vitamin D status; the meta-analysis of their data revealed that lower vitamin D status is significantly associated with the likelihood of ADHD (OR: 2.57; 95% CI: 1.09, 6.04; I2 = 84.3%). Furthermore, the meta-analysis of prospective studies conducted in 4137 participants indicated that perinatal suboptimal vitamin D concentrations are significantly associated with a higher risk of ADHD in later life (RR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.81; I2 = 0.0%). It should be noted that the association found in prospective studies was sensitive to one of the included investigations. The present review provides evidence supporting the relation between vitamin D deficiency and ADHD. However, the overall effect sizes are small, and therefore the association should be considered equivocal at this time. Further prospective cohort studies and community-based intervention trials are highly recommended to better elucidate the causal association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutrition and Food Security Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran. Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.Research Center of Addiction and Behavioral Sciences, Diabetes Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.Nutrition and Food Security Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran. Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29438455

Citation

Khoshbakht, Yadollah, et al. "Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies." Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), vol. 9, no. 1, 2018, pp. 9-20.
Khoshbakht Y, Bidaki R, Salehi-Abargouei A. Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Adv Nutr. 2018;9(1):9-20.
Khoshbakht, Y., Bidaki, R., & Salehi-Abargouei, A. (2018). Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Advances in Nutrition (Bethesda, Md.), 9(1), pp. 9-20. doi:10.1093/advances/nmx002.
Khoshbakht Y, Bidaki R, Salehi-Abargouei A. Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. Adv Nutr. 2018 01 1;9(1):9-20. PubMed PMID: 29438455.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D Status and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies. AU - Khoshbakht,Yadollah, AU - Bidaki,Reza, AU - Salehi-Abargouei,Amin, PY - 2018/2/14/entrez PY - 2018/2/14/pubmed PY - 2019/6/4/medline KW - adolescents KW - attention deficit disorder with hyperactivity KW - children KW - meta-analysis KW - systematic review KW - vitamin D SP - 9 EP - 20 JF - Advances in nutrition (Bethesda, Md.) JO - Adv Nutr VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - An association between vitamin D and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been proposed by several researchers in recent years; however, the investigations have led to inconsistent results. The present study was conducted to summarize the published observational data on the relation between vitamin D status and the likelihood of ADHD. Online databases, including PubMed, the ISI Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus, were checked up to June 2017 for relevant observational studies. A random-effects model was incorporated to summarize the study results. Out of 2770 retrieved articles, 13 observational studies (9 case-control or cross-sectional studies and 4 prospective studies) were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review and meta-analysis. Analysis of the 10,334 children and adolescents who attended the 9 case-control or cross-sectional studies revealed that children with ADHD have lower serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D than do healthy children (weighted mean difference: -6.75 ng/mL; 95% CI: -9.73, -3.77 ng/mL; I2 = 94.9%]. Five case-control studies reported the OR for developing ADHD based on vitamin D status; the meta-analysis of their data revealed that lower vitamin D status is significantly associated with the likelihood of ADHD (OR: 2.57; 95% CI: 1.09, 6.04; I2 = 84.3%). Furthermore, the meta-analysis of prospective studies conducted in 4137 participants indicated that perinatal suboptimal vitamin D concentrations are significantly associated with a higher risk of ADHD in later life (RR: 1.40; 95% CI: 1.09, 1.81; I2 = 0.0%). It should be noted that the association found in prospective studies was sensitive to one of the included investigations. The present review provides evidence supporting the relation between vitamin D deficiency and ADHD. However, the overall effect sizes are small, and therefore the association should be considered equivocal at this time. Further prospective cohort studies and community-based intervention trials are highly recommended to better elucidate the causal association. SN - 2156-5376 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29438455/Vitamin_D_Status_and_Attention_Deficit_Hyperactivity_Disorder:_A_Systematic_Review_and_Meta_Analysis_of_Observational_Studies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/advances/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/advances/nmx002 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -