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Utility of the LIBRA Index in Relation to Cognitive Functioning in a Clinical Health Seeking Sample.
J Alzheimers Dis. 2018; 62(1):373-384.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dementia prevalence is expected to increase substantially over the next few decades. Since there is currently no cure for dementia available, there is an urgent need for the early identification of individuals at high risk for dementia, so that primary and secondary prevention strategies can be implemented. Recently, the LIfestyle for BRAin health (LIBRA) index was developed as a new dementia risk algorithm. It specifically focuses on modifiable risk and protective factors that can be targeted in midlife.

OBJECTIVE

The objective of this study was to evaluate the LIBRA index in relation to markers of cognitive functioning in a clinical, health-seeking sample of community-based older adults.

METHODS

484 participants (mean age 62.7 years) were recruited from the Healthy Brain Ageing Clinic at the Brain and Mind Centre, Sydney. Participants underwent comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological assessment and completed a self-report survey pack. Participants were rated via consensus as having either subjective cognitive complaints (SCC) or meeting criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The LIBRA score was calculated based on 11 available risk and protective factors.

RESULTS

65.4% of the sample met criteria for MCI. People with MCI showed a significantly higher LIBRA score compared to people with SCC. Furthermore, multiple cognitive domains, in particular executive functioning, were associated with a higher LIBRA score, with stronger correlations in people with MCI.

CONCLUSION

The LIBRA index might be a useful tool to determine lifestyle-attributable risk of cognitive decline in an older health-seeking population, including people with MCI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Healthy Brain Ageing Program, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.Healthy Brain Ageing Program, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.Healthy Brain Ageing Program, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.Alzheimer Centrum Limburg, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Alzheimer Centrum Limburg, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.Healthy Brain Ageing Program, School of Psychology, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Charles Perkins Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Brain and Mind Centre, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29439337

Citation

Pons, Anke, et al. "Utility of the LIBRA Index in Relation to Cognitive Functioning in a Clinical Health Seeking Sample." Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, vol. 62, no. 1, 2018, pp. 373-384.
Pons A, LaMonica HM, Mowszowski L, et al. Utility of the LIBRA Index in Relation to Cognitive Functioning in a Clinical Health Seeking Sample. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;62(1):373-384.
Pons, A., LaMonica, H. M., Mowszowski, L., Köhler, S., Deckers, K., & Naismith, S. L. (2018). Utility of the LIBRA Index in Relation to Cognitive Functioning in a Clinical Health Seeking Sample. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD, 62(1), 373-384. https://doi.org/10.3233/JAD-170731
Pons A, et al. Utility of the LIBRA Index in Relation to Cognitive Functioning in a Clinical Health Seeking Sample. J Alzheimers Dis. 2018;62(1):373-384. PubMed PMID: 29439337.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Utility of the LIBRA Index in Relation to Cognitive Functioning in a Clinical Health Seeking Sample. AU - Pons,Anke, AU - LaMonica,Haley M, AU - Mowszowski,Loren, AU - Köhler,Sebastian, AU - Deckers,Kay, AU - Naismith,Sharon L, PY - 2018/2/15/entrez PY - 2018/2/15/pubmed PY - 2019/3/26/medline KW - Dementia KW - mild cognitive impairment KW - modifiable risk factors KW - prevention SP - 373 EP - 384 JF - Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD JO - J Alzheimers Dis VL - 62 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dementia prevalence is expected to increase substantially over the next few decades. Since there is currently no cure for dementia available, there is an urgent need for the early identification of individuals at high risk for dementia, so that primary and secondary prevention strategies can be implemented. Recently, the LIfestyle for BRAin health (LIBRA) index was developed as a new dementia risk algorithm. It specifically focuses on modifiable risk and protective factors that can be targeted in midlife. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the LIBRA index in relation to markers of cognitive functioning in a clinical, health-seeking sample of community-based older adults. METHODS: 484 participants (mean age 62.7 years) were recruited from the Healthy Brain Ageing Clinic at the Brain and Mind Centre, Sydney. Participants underwent comprehensive clinical and neuropsychological assessment and completed a self-report survey pack. Participants were rated via consensus as having either subjective cognitive complaints (SCC) or meeting criteria for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). The LIBRA score was calculated based on 11 available risk and protective factors. RESULTS: 65.4% of the sample met criteria for MCI. People with MCI showed a significantly higher LIBRA score compared to people with SCC. Furthermore, multiple cognitive domains, in particular executive functioning, were associated with a higher LIBRA score, with stronger correlations in people with MCI. CONCLUSION: The LIBRA index might be a useful tool to determine lifestyle-attributable risk of cognitive decline in an older health-seeking population, including people with MCI. SN - 1875-8908 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29439337/Utility_of_the_LIBRA_Index_in_Relation_to_Cognitive_Functioning_in_a_Clinical_Health_Seeking_Sample_ L2 - https://content.iospress.com/openurl?genre=article&id=doi:10.3233/JAD-170731 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -