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Associations between modifiable lifestyle factors and multidimensional cognitive health among community-dwelling old adults: stratified by educational level.
Int Psychogeriatr 2018; 30(10):1465-1476IP

Abstract

ABSTRACT

Background:

Cognition is multidimensional, and each domain plays a unique and crucial part in successful daily life engagement. However, less attention has been paid to multi-domain cognitive health for the elderly, and the role of lifestyle factors in each domain remains unclear.

METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional study of 3,230 older adults aged 60+ years in Xiamen, China, in 2016. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was used to measure general cognition and six specific sub-domains. To account for educational effects, we adjusted the MoCA score and divided respondents into three education-specific groups (low, moderate, and high education groups with ≤5, 6~8, and ≥9 years of education, respectively). A series of proportional odds models were used to detect the associations between two categories of lifestyle factors - substance abuse (cigarette and alcohol) and leisure activity (TV watching, reading, smartphone use, social activity, and exercise) - and general cognition and the six sub-domains in those three groups.

RESULTS

Among the 3,230 respondents, 2,617 eligible participants were included with a mean age of 69.05 ± 7.07 years. Previous or current smoking/drinking was not associated with MoCA scores in the whole population, but unexpectedly, the ex-smokers in the low education group performed better in general cognition (OR = 2.22) and attention (OR = 2.05) than their never-smoking counterparts. Modest TV watching, reading, and smartphone use also contributed to better cognition among elderly participants in the low education group. For the highly educated elderly, comparatively longer reading (>3.5 hours/week) was inversely associated with general cognition (OR = 0.53), memory (OR = 0.59), and language (OR = 0.54), while adequate exercise (5~7 days/week) was positively related to these factors with OR = 1.48, OR = 1.49, and OR = 1.53, respectively. For the moderately educated elderly, only modest reading was significantly beneficial.

CONCLUSIONS

Lifestyle factors play different roles in multidimensional cognitive health in different educational groups, indicating that individual intervention strategies should be designed according to specific educational groups and different cognitive sub-domains.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics,School of Public Health,Xiamen University,Xiamen 361102,China.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics,School of Public Health,Xiamen University,Xiamen 361102,China.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics,School of Public Health,Xiamen University,Xiamen 361102,China.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics,School of Public Health,Xiamen University,Xiamen 361102,China.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics,School of Public Health,Xiamen University,Xiamen 361102,China.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics,School of Public Health,Xiamen University,Xiamen 361102,China.School of Public Health,Texas A&M University,College Station,TX,USA.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics,School of Public Health,Xiamen University,Xiamen 361102,China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29444740

Citation

Yuan, Manqiong, et al. "Associations Between Modifiable Lifestyle Factors and Multidimensional Cognitive Health Among Community-dwelling Old Adults: Stratified By Educational Level." International Psychogeriatrics, vol. 30, no. 10, 2018, pp. 1465-1476.
Yuan M, Chen J, Han Y, et al. Associations between modifiable lifestyle factors and multidimensional cognitive health among community-dwelling old adults: stratified by educational level. Int Psychogeriatr. 2018;30(10):1465-1476.
Yuan, M., Chen, J., Han, Y., Wei, X., Ye, Z., Zhang, L., ... Fang, Y. (2018). Associations between modifiable lifestyle factors and multidimensional cognitive health among community-dwelling old adults: stratified by educational level. International Psychogeriatrics, 30(10), pp. 1465-1476. doi:10.1017/S1041610217003076.
Yuan M, et al. Associations Between Modifiable Lifestyle Factors and Multidimensional Cognitive Health Among Community-dwelling Old Adults: Stratified By Educational Level. Int Psychogeriatr. 2018;30(10):1465-1476. PubMed PMID: 29444740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between modifiable lifestyle factors and multidimensional cognitive health among community-dwelling old adults: stratified by educational level. AU - Yuan,Manqiong, AU - Chen,Jia, AU - Han,Yaofeng, AU - Wei,Xingliang, AU - Ye,Zirong, AU - Zhang,Liangwen, AU - Hong,Y Alicia, AU - Fang,Ya, Y1 - 2018/02/15/ PY - 2018/2/16/pubmed PY - 2019/8/6/medline PY - 2018/2/16/entrez KW - education-specific KW - lifestyle factors KW - multi-domain cognitive health KW - proportional odds model KW - the elderly SP - 1465 EP - 1476 JF - International psychogeriatrics JO - Int Psychogeriatr VL - 30 IS - 10 N2 - : ABSTRACTBackground:Cognition is multidimensional, and each domain plays a unique and crucial part in successful daily life engagement. However, less attention has been paid to multi-domain cognitive health for the elderly, and the role of lifestyle factors in each domain remains unclear. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 3,230 older adults aged 60+ years in Xiamen, China, in 2016. The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was used to measure general cognition and six specific sub-domains. To account for educational effects, we adjusted the MoCA score and divided respondents into three education-specific groups (low, moderate, and high education groups with ≤5, 6~8, and ≥9 years of education, respectively). A series of proportional odds models were used to detect the associations between two categories of lifestyle factors - substance abuse (cigarette and alcohol) and leisure activity (TV watching, reading, smartphone use, social activity, and exercise) - and general cognition and the six sub-domains in those three groups. RESULTS: Among the 3,230 respondents, 2,617 eligible participants were included with a mean age of 69.05 ± 7.07 years. Previous or current smoking/drinking was not associated with MoCA scores in the whole population, but unexpectedly, the ex-smokers in the low education group performed better in general cognition (OR = 2.22) and attention (OR = 2.05) than their never-smoking counterparts. Modest TV watching, reading, and smartphone use also contributed to better cognition among elderly participants in the low education group. For the highly educated elderly, comparatively longer reading (>3.5 hours/week) was inversely associated with general cognition (OR = 0.53), memory (OR = 0.59), and language (OR = 0.54), while adequate exercise (5~7 days/week) was positively related to these factors with OR = 1.48, OR = 1.49, and OR = 1.53, respectively. For the moderately educated elderly, only modest reading was significantly beneficial. CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle factors play different roles in multidimensional cognitive health in different educational groups, indicating that individual intervention strategies should be designed according to specific educational groups and different cognitive sub-domains. SN - 1741-203X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29444740/Associations_between_modifiable_lifestyle_factors_and_multidimensional_cognitive_health_among_community_dwelling_old_adults:_stratified_by_educational_level_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1041610217003076/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -