Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Electrophysiological evidence of memory-based detection of auditory regularity violations in anesthetized mice.
Sci Rep. 2018 02 14; 8(1):3027.SR

Abstract

In humans, automatic change detection is reflected by an electrical brain response called mismatch negativity (MMN). Mismatch response is also elicited in mice, but it is unclear to what extent it is functionally similar to human MMN. We investigated this possible similarity by recording local field potentials from the auditory cortex of anesthetized mice. First, we tested whether the response to stimulus changes reflected the detection of regularity violations or adaptation to standard stimuli. Responses obtained from an oddball condition, where occasional changes in frequency were presented amongst of a standard sound, were compared to responses obtained from a control condition, where no regularities existed. To test whether the differential response to the deviant sounds in the oddball condition is dependent on sensory memory, responses from the oddball condition using 375 ms and 600 ms inter-stimulus intervals (ISI) were compared. We found a differential response to deviant sounds which was larger with the shorter than the longer ISI. Furthermore, the oddball deviant sound elicited larger response than the same sound in the control condition. These results demonstrate that the mismatch response in mice reflects detection of regularity violations and sensory memory function, as the human MMN.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland. jari.kurkela@jyu.fi.Department of Psychology, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland. Department of Neuroinformatics, Radboud University, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.Department of Psychology, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland.Department of Psychology, University of Jyvaskyla, Jyväskylä, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29445171

Citation

Kurkela, Jari L O., et al. "Electrophysiological Evidence of Memory-based Detection of Auditory Regularity Violations in Anesthetized Mice." Scientific Reports, vol. 8, no. 1, 2018, p. 3027.
Kurkela JLO, Lipponen A, Kyläheiko I, et al. Electrophysiological evidence of memory-based detection of auditory regularity violations in anesthetized mice. Sci Rep. 2018;8(1):3027.
Kurkela, J. L. O., Lipponen, A., Kyläheiko, I., & Astikainen, P. (2018). Electrophysiological evidence of memory-based detection of auditory regularity violations in anesthetized mice. Scientific Reports, 8(1), 3027. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-21411-z
Kurkela JLO, et al. Electrophysiological Evidence of Memory-based Detection of Auditory Regularity Violations in Anesthetized Mice. Sci Rep. 2018 02 14;8(1):3027. PubMed PMID: 29445171.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Electrophysiological evidence of memory-based detection of auditory regularity violations in anesthetized mice. AU - Kurkela,Jari L O, AU - Lipponen,Arto, AU - Kyläheiko,Iiris, AU - Astikainen,Piia, Y1 - 2018/02/14/ PY - 2017/08/31/received PY - 2018/01/30/accepted PY - 2018/2/16/entrez PY - 2018/2/16/pubmed PY - 2019/10/30/medline SP - 3027 EP - 3027 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 8 IS - 1 N2 - In humans, automatic change detection is reflected by an electrical brain response called mismatch negativity (MMN). Mismatch response is also elicited in mice, but it is unclear to what extent it is functionally similar to human MMN. We investigated this possible similarity by recording local field potentials from the auditory cortex of anesthetized mice. First, we tested whether the response to stimulus changes reflected the detection of regularity violations or adaptation to standard stimuli. Responses obtained from an oddball condition, where occasional changes in frequency were presented amongst of a standard sound, were compared to responses obtained from a control condition, where no regularities existed. To test whether the differential response to the deviant sounds in the oddball condition is dependent on sensory memory, responses from the oddball condition using 375 ms and 600 ms inter-stimulus intervals (ISI) were compared. We found a differential response to deviant sounds which was larger with the shorter than the longer ISI. Furthermore, the oddball deviant sound elicited larger response than the same sound in the control condition. These results demonstrate that the mismatch response in mice reflects detection of regularity violations and sensory memory function, as the human MMN. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29445171/Electrophysiological_evidence_of_memory_based_detection_of_auditory_regularity_violations_in_anesthetized_mice_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-21411-z DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -