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Altered resting-state voxel-level whole-brain functional connectivity in depressed Parkinson's disease.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2018 05; 50:74-80.PR

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Depression is one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), but its pathogenesis is still not very clear. Recently, degree centrality, a voxel-level whole-brain functional connectivity (FC) analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided the most promising way to explore the neural network mechanisms underlying depressed PD.

METHODS

Degree centrality, voxel-wise image and clinical symptoms correlation and secondary seed-based FC analyses were performed in twenty-seven drug-naïve, early stage depressed PD patients, 27 non-depressed PD patients and 27 healthy controls (HCs) to reveal voxel-level whole-brain FC changes in depressed PD.

RESULTS

Compared with the HCs, depressed PD and non-depressed PD patients shared similar brain degree centrality abnormalities mainly in the basal ganglia, insular cortex, motor cortices, default mode network, prefrontal gyrus and the cerebellum. However, compared with non-depressed PD, depressed PD showed degree centrality abnormalities in the right middle prefrontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortices, supplementary motor cortices and cerebellum lobule VI. The right middle prefrontal gyrus degree centrality abnormalities were correlated with the clinical depression severity, and using it as a seed, a secondary seed-based FC analysis further revealed the FC changes in the anterior cingulate cortices and the cerebellum lobule VI.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings revealed that dysfunction in extensive brain areas were involved in depressed PD, and among these regions, the right middle prefrontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortices and the cerebellum may pose as pathogenesis hubs underlying depressed PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China.Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, China. Electronic address: fwd9707@sina.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29449183

Citation

Wang, Hansheng, et al. "Altered Resting-state Voxel-level Whole-brain Functional Connectivity in Depressed Parkinson's Disease." Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, vol. 50, 2018, pp. 74-80.
Wang H, Chen H, Wu J, et al. Altered resting-state voxel-level whole-brain functional connectivity in depressed Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2018;50:74-80.
Wang, H., Chen, H., Wu, J., Tao, L., Pang, Y., Gu, M., Lv, F., Luo, T., Cheng, O., Sheng, K., Luo, J., Hu, Y., & Fang, W. (2018). Altered resting-state voxel-level whole-brain functional connectivity in depressed Parkinson's disease. Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, 50, 74-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2018.02.019
Wang H, et al. Altered Resting-state Voxel-level Whole-brain Functional Connectivity in Depressed Parkinson's Disease. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2018;50:74-80. PubMed PMID: 29449183.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Altered resting-state voxel-level whole-brain functional connectivity in depressed Parkinson's disease. AU - Wang,Hansheng, AU - Chen,Huiyue, AU - Wu,Jiahui, AU - Tao,Li, AU - Pang,Ya, AU - Gu,Min, AU - Lv,Fajin, AU - Luo,Tianyou, AU - Cheng,Oumei, AU - Sheng,Ke, AU - Luo,Jin, AU - Hu,Yida, AU - Fang,Weidong, Y1 - 2018/02/09/ PY - 2017/08/20/received PY - 2017/12/24/revised PY - 2018/02/08/accepted PY - 2018/2/17/pubmed PY - 2019/6/22/medline PY - 2018/2/17/entrez KW - Degree centrality KW - Depression KW - Functional connectivity KW - Parkinson's disease KW - Resting-state fMRI SP - 74 EP - 80 JF - Parkinsonism & related disorders JO - Parkinsonism Relat. Disord. VL - 50 N2 - BACKGROUND: Depression is one of the most common non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD), but its pathogenesis is still not very clear. Recently, degree centrality, a voxel-level whole-brain functional connectivity (FC) analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, has provided the most promising way to explore the neural network mechanisms underlying depressed PD. METHODS: Degree centrality, voxel-wise image and clinical symptoms correlation and secondary seed-based FC analyses were performed in twenty-seven drug-naïve, early stage depressed PD patients, 27 non-depressed PD patients and 27 healthy controls (HCs) to reveal voxel-level whole-brain FC changes in depressed PD. RESULTS: Compared with the HCs, depressed PD and non-depressed PD patients shared similar brain degree centrality abnormalities mainly in the basal ganglia, insular cortex, motor cortices, default mode network, prefrontal gyrus and the cerebellum. However, compared with non-depressed PD, depressed PD showed degree centrality abnormalities in the right middle prefrontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortices, supplementary motor cortices and cerebellum lobule VI. The right middle prefrontal gyrus degree centrality abnormalities were correlated with the clinical depression severity, and using it as a seed, a secondary seed-based FC analysis further revealed the FC changes in the anterior cingulate cortices and the cerebellum lobule VI. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings revealed that dysfunction in extensive brain areas were involved in depressed PD, and among these regions, the right middle prefrontal gyrus, anterior cingulate cortices and the cerebellum may pose as pathogenesis hubs underlying depressed PD. SN - 1873-5126 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29449183/Altered_resting_state_voxel_level_whole_brain_functional_connectivity_in_depressed_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1353-8020(18)30055-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -