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Microbial infection pattern, pathogenic features and resistance mechanism of carbapenem-resistant Gram negative bacilli during long-term hospitalization.
Microb Pathog 2018; 117:356-360MP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) have become an important cause of nosocomial infections of hospitalized patients.

METHODS

To investigate the microbial infection patterns and molecular epidemiology characteristics of the carbapenem-resistant GNB isolates from a long-term hospitalized patient, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, phenotypic screening test for carbapenemase production, PCR screening and DNA sequencing of carbapenemase genes, repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR), multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) and genetic environment analysis were performed.

RESULTS

Twelve strains with carbapenemase genes were detected from 63 carbapenem-resistant isolates, including two blaIMP-25-carrying Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one blaNDM-1-carrying Citrobacter freundii, three blaNDM-1-carrying Klebsiella pneumoniae and six blaKPC-2-carrying K. pneumoniae. Only the blaNDM-1 genes were successfully transferred from three K. pneumoniae strains to Escherichia coli C600 by conjugation. Genetic environment of blaIMP-25, blaNDM-1 and blaKPC-2 genes in our study were consistent with previous reports. Molecular typing of K. pneumoniae performed by MLST revealed that most of the isolates belonged to ST11. blaNDM-1-carrying K. pneumoniae sequencing type 1416 was first reported in our study.

CONCLUSIONS

Carbapenem-resistant GNB are common pathogens during long-term hospitalization, and ST11 blaKPC-2-carrying K. pneumoniae is the dominant bacterium in our study. Colonization and horizontal transmission of resistance by plasmids of carbapenem-resistant GNB have increased the risks of persistent infection and mortality of long-term hospitalized patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China.School of Food Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China.School of Food Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China; Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA.Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA.Centre for Translational Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China; Centre for Translational Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China.School of Food Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China; Guangdong Province Key Laboratory for Green Processing of Natural Products and Product Safety, Guangzhou 510640, China; Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA. Electronic address: zhenbo.xu@hotmail.com.Department of Microbial Pathogenesis, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.Department of Laboratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China; Centre for Translational Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510120, China. Electronic address: jyksys@126.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29452198

Citation

Wen, Shuxian, et al. "Microbial Infection Pattern, Pathogenic Features and Resistance Mechanism of Carbapenem-resistant Gram Negative Bacilli During Long-term Hospitalization." Microbial Pathogenesis, vol. 117, 2018, pp. 356-360.
Wen S, Feng D, Lu Z, et al. Microbial infection pattern, pathogenic features and resistance mechanism of carbapenem-resistant Gram negative bacilli during long-term hospitalization. Microb Pathog. 2018;117:356-360.
Wen, S., Feng, D., Lu, Z., Liu, J., Peters, B. M., Tang, H., ... Chen, D. (2018). Microbial infection pattern, pathogenic features and resistance mechanism of carbapenem-resistant Gram negative bacilli during long-term hospitalization. Microbial Pathogenesis, 117, pp. 356-360. doi:10.1016/j.micpath.2018.02.025.
Wen S, et al. Microbial Infection Pattern, Pathogenic Features and Resistance Mechanism of Carbapenem-resistant Gram Negative Bacilli During Long-term Hospitalization. Microb Pathog. 2018;117:356-360. PubMed PMID: 29452198.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbial infection pattern, pathogenic features and resistance mechanism of carbapenem-resistant Gram negative bacilli during long-term hospitalization. AU - Wen,Shuxian, AU - Feng,Donghua, AU - Lu,Zerong, AU - Liu,Junyan, AU - Peters,Brian M, AU - Tang,Hailing, AU - Su,Danhong, AU - Lin,Yong-Ping, AU - Yang,Ling, AU - Xu,Zhenbo, AU - Shirtliff,Mark E, AU - Chen,Dingqiang, Y1 - 2018/02/13/ PY - 2017/12/24/received PY - 2018/01/28/revised PY - 2018/02/12/accepted PY - 2018/2/17/pubmed PY - 2018/8/29/medline PY - 2018/2/17/entrez KW - Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli KW - Carbapenemase genes KW - Long-term hospitalized patient KW - Nosocomial infection SP - 356 EP - 360 JF - Microbial pathogenesis JO - Microb. Pathog. VL - 117 N2 - BACKGROUND: Carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli (GNB) have become an important cause of nosocomial infections of hospitalized patients. METHODS: To investigate the microbial infection patterns and molecular epidemiology characteristics of the carbapenem-resistant GNB isolates from a long-term hospitalized patient, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, phenotypic screening test for carbapenemase production, PCR screening and DNA sequencing of carbapenemase genes, repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-based PCR (REP-PCR), multilocus sequencing typing (MLST) and genetic environment analysis were performed. RESULTS: Twelve strains with carbapenemase genes were detected from 63 carbapenem-resistant isolates, including two blaIMP-25-carrying Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one blaNDM-1-carrying Citrobacter freundii, three blaNDM-1-carrying Klebsiella pneumoniae and six blaKPC-2-carrying K. pneumoniae. Only the blaNDM-1 genes were successfully transferred from three K. pneumoniae strains to Escherichia coli C600 by conjugation. Genetic environment of blaIMP-25, blaNDM-1 and blaKPC-2 genes in our study were consistent with previous reports. Molecular typing of K. pneumoniae performed by MLST revealed that most of the isolates belonged to ST11. blaNDM-1-carrying K. pneumoniae sequencing type 1416 was first reported in our study. CONCLUSIONS: Carbapenem-resistant GNB are common pathogens during long-term hospitalization, and ST11 blaKPC-2-carrying K. pneumoniae is the dominant bacterium in our study. Colonization and horizontal transmission of resistance by plasmids of carbapenem-resistant GNB have increased the risks of persistent infection and mortality of long-term hospitalized patients. SN - 1096-1208 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29452198/Microbial_infection_pattern_pathogenic_features_and_resistance_mechanism_of_carbapenem_resistant_Gram_negative_bacilli_during_long_term_hospitalization_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0882-4010(17)31759-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -