Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Comparison of visceral, body fat indices and anthropometric measures in relation to chronic kidney disease among Chinese adults from a large scale cross-sectional study.
BMC Nephrol 2018; 19(1):40BN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The aim of the study was to assess the association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and obesity in predicting CKD among Chinese adults, distinguishing between 5 different adiposity indices: visceral fat index (VFI), percentage body fat (PBF), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR).

METHODS

A total of 29,516 participants aged 35 years or above were selected using a stratified multistage random sampling method across China during 2012-2015. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.72m2.

RESULTS

The overall weighted prevalence of CKD was 3.94% (3.62% in males and 4.25% in females). All five adiposity indices had significant negative correlations to eGFR (P < 0.05). The area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curves (AUC) for PBF was almost significantly larger than the other adiposity indices (P < 0.001). In addition, PBF yielded the highest Youden index in identifying CKD (male: 0.15; female: 0.20). In the logistic analysis, PBF had the highest crude odds ratios (ORs) in both males (OR: 1.819, 95% CI 1.559-2.123) and females (OR: 2.268, 95% CI 1.980-2.597). After adjusted for age, smoking status, alcohol use, education level, marital status, rural vs. urban area, geographic regions, and diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction and stroke, the ORs on PBF remained significant for both genders (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS

Obesity is associated with an increased risk of CKD. Furthermore, PBF was a better predictor for identifying CKD than other adiposity indices (BMI, WC, WHtR, and VFI).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China. wangzengwu@foxmail.com.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Division of Prevention and Community Health, National Center for Cardiovascular Disease, Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 102308, China.Fuwai Hospital, Pecking Union Medical College & Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100037, China.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29454330

Citation

Dong, Ying, et al. "Comparison of Visceral, Body Fat Indices and Anthropometric Measures in Relation to Chronic Kidney Disease Among Chinese Adults From a Large Scale Cross-sectional Study." BMC Nephrology, vol. 19, no. 1, 2018, p. 40.
Dong Y, Wang Z, Chen Z, et al. Comparison of visceral, body fat indices and anthropometric measures in relation to chronic kidney disease among Chinese adults from a large scale cross-sectional study. BMC Nephrol. 2018;19(1):40.
Dong, Y., Wang, Z., Chen, Z., Wang, X., Zhang, L., Nie, J., ... Gao, R. (2018). Comparison of visceral, body fat indices and anthropometric measures in relation to chronic kidney disease among Chinese adults from a large scale cross-sectional study. BMC Nephrology, 19(1), p. 40. doi:10.1186/s12882-018-0837-1.
Dong Y, et al. Comparison of Visceral, Body Fat Indices and Anthropometric Measures in Relation to Chronic Kidney Disease Among Chinese Adults From a Large Scale Cross-sectional Study. BMC Nephrol. 2018 02 17;19(1):40. PubMed PMID: 29454330.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of visceral, body fat indices and anthropometric measures in relation to chronic kidney disease among Chinese adults from a large scale cross-sectional study. AU - Dong,Ying, AU - Wang,Zengwu, AU - Chen,Zuo, AU - Wang,Xin, AU - Zhang,Linfeng, AU - Nie,Jingyu, AU - Zheng,Congyi, AU - Wang,Jiali, AU - Shao,Lan, AU - Tian,Ye, AU - Gao,Runlin, Y1 - 2018/02/17/ PY - 2017/08/02/received PY - 2018/02/07/accepted PY - 2018/2/19/entrez PY - 2018/2/20/pubmed PY - 2019/3/13/medline KW - Adiposity indices KW - Chinese adults KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - Cross-sectional study KW - Percentage body fat SP - 40 EP - 40 JF - BMC nephrology JO - BMC Nephrol VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to assess the association between chronic kidney disease (CKD) and obesity in predicting CKD among Chinese adults, distinguishing between 5 different adiposity indices: visceral fat index (VFI), percentage body fat (PBF), body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR). METHODS: A total of 29,516 participants aged 35 years or above were selected using a stratified multistage random sampling method across China during 2012-2015. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.72m2. RESULTS: The overall weighted prevalence of CKD was 3.94% (3.62% in males and 4.25% in females). All five adiposity indices had significant negative correlations to eGFR (P < 0.05). The area under the ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curves (AUC) for PBF was almost significantly larger than the other adiposity indices (P < 0.001). In addition, PBF yielded the highest Youden index in identifying CKD (male: 0.15; female: 0.20). In the logistic analysis, PBF had the highest crude odds ratios (ORs) in both males (OR: 1.819, 95% CI 1.559-2.123) and females (OR: 2.268, 95% CI 1.980-2.597). After adjusted for age, smoking status, alcohol use, education level, marital status, rural vs. urban area, geographic regions, and diagnosis of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, myocardial infarction and stroke, the ORs on PBF remained significant for both genders (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity is associated with an increased risk of CKD. Furthermore, PBF was a better predictor for identifying CKD than other adiposity indices (BMI, WC, WHtR, and VFI). SN - 1471-2369 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29454330/Comparison_of_visceral_body_fat_indices_and_anthropometric_measures_in_relation_to_chronic_kidney_disease_among_Chinese_adults_from_a_large_scale_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2369/19/40 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -