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Postnatal depression in a community-based study of women with polycystic ovary syndrome.
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 2018; 97(7):838-844AO

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are susceptible to depression and anxiety and so may also be at risk for postnatal depression. This study investigates whether women with polycystic ovary syndrome have an elevated risk of postnatal depression.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

Cross-sectional data for parous women (n = 566) were available from a birth cohort. Polycystic ovary syndrome was diagnosed using the Rotterdam criteria. Details of reproductive history, pregnancy, birth, and postnatal depression were obtained through structured interview. Comparisons were made between women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome using logistic regression analysis, including the investigation of interactions.

RESULTS

A positive but statistically non-significant association was found between polycystic ovary syndrome and postnatal depression (odds ratio 1.6, 95% confidence interval 0.9-2.9). Compared with their counterparts, women with polycystic ovary syndrome were substantially more likely: to have difficulty conceiving (odds ratio 5.2, 95% confidence interval 2.9-9.4), to have conceived with medical assistance (odds ratio 11.6, 95% confidence interval 5.5-24.4), and to have pregnancy complications (gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, or preeclampsia; odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.5). Where women with polycystic ovary syndrome had a history of miscarriage or conceived with medical assistance, the combination interacted (p = 0.06 and p < 0.05, respectively), with over half of such women having postnatal depression.

CONCLUSIONS

Although women with polycystic ovary syndrome may not have an excess risk of postnatal depression overall, those who had suffered a miscarriage or required medical assistance to conceive were at substantially elevated risk. Findings point to vulnerability inherent in polycystic ovary syndrome being amplified, either by stressful experiences on the pathway to pregnancy/childbirth or by specific fertility treatment regimens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.Adelaide Medical School, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.Robinson Research Institute, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. School of Public Health, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. Fay Gale Center for Research on Gender, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29460299

Citation

March, Wendy A., et al. "Postnatal Depression in a Community-based Study of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome." Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, vol. 97, no. 7, 2018, pp. 838-844.
March WA, Whitrow MJ, Davies MJ, et al. Postnatal depression in a community-based study of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018;97(7):838-844.
March, W. A., Whitrow, M. J., Davies, M. J., Fernandez, R. C., & Moore, V. M. (2018). Postnatal depression in a community-based study of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica, 97(7), pp. 838-844. doi:10.1111/aogs.13332.
March WA, et al. Postnatal Depression in a Community-based Study of Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018;97(7):838-844. PubMed PMID: 29460299.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Postnatal depression in a community-based study of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. AU - March,Wendy A, AU - Whitrow,Melissa J, AU - Davies,Michael J, AU - Fernandez,Renae C, AU - Moore,Vivienne M, Y1 - 2018/03/13/ PY - 2017/08/15/received PY - 2018/02/12/accepted PY - 2018/2/21/pubmed PY - 2019/3/28/medline PY - 2018/2/21/entrez KW - Polycystic ovary syndrome KW - infertility KW - miscarriage KW - postnatal depression KW - postpartum depression KW - pregnancy complications KW - stress SP - 838 EP - 844 JF - Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica JO - Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand VL - 97 IS - 7 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Women with polycystic ovary syndrome are susceptible to depression and anxiety and so may also be at risk for postnatal depression. This study investigates whether women with polycystic ovary syndrome have an elevated risk of postnatal depression. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cross-sectional data for parous women (n = 566) were available from a birth cohort. Polycystic ovary syndrome was diagnosed using the Rotterdam criteria. Details of reproductive history, pregnancy, birth, and postnatal depression were obtained through structured interview. Comparisons were made between women with and without polycystic ovary syndrome using logistic regression analysis, including the investigation of interactions. RESULTS: A positive but statistically non-significant association was found between polycystic ovary syndrome and postnatal depression (odds ratio 1.6, 95% confidence interval 0.9-2.9). Compared with their counterparts, women with polycystic ovary syndrome were substantially more likely: to have difficulty conceiving (odds ratio 5.2, 95% confidence interval 2.9-9.4), to have conceived with medical assistance (odds ratio 11.6, 95% confidence interval 5.5-24.4), and to have pregnancy complications (gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, or preeclampsia; odds ratio 2.0, 95% confidence interval 1.1-3.5). Where women with polycystic ovary syndrome had a history of miscarriage or conceived with medical assistance, the combination interacted (p = 0.06 and p < 0.05, respectively), with over half of such women having postnatal depression. CONCLUSIONS: Although women with polycystic ovary syndrome may not have an excess risk of postnatal depression overall, those who had suffered a miscarriage or required medical assistance to conceive were at substantially elevated risk. Findings point to vulnerability inherent in polycystic ovary syndrome being amplified, either by stressful experiences on the pathway to pregnancy/childbirth or by specific fertility treatment regimens. SN - 1600-0412 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29460299/Postnatal_depression_in_a_community_based_study_of_women_with_polycystic_ovary_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/aogs.13332 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -