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Rethinking the acculturation gap-distress theory among Asian Americans: Testing bidirectional indirect relations.
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2019; 89(6):627-639.AJ

Abstract

The acculturation gap-distress theory postulates that parent-offspring acculturation mismatch precipitates greater intergenerational conflict in immigrant families, which in turn increases the risk for psychological problems among offspring. Whereas cross-sectional studies have shown support for these theory-informed relations, comparatively little is known about whether acculturation mismatch negatively affects psychological functioning, or whether offspring's psychological problems precipitate greater perceived acculturation mismatch via intergenerational cultural conflict. Furthermore, more research is needed to investigate how acculturation and family conflict affect Asian Americans transitioning into college and emerging adulthood. Across two measurement occasions, two cohorts of Asian American first-year college students (N = 555, Mage = 17.99, 56.0% women) completed survey questionnaires assessing their perception of parent-offspring acculturation discrepancies, acculturation-related intergenerational conflict, and internalizing and externalizing symptoms. For both sets of psychological functioning, gender invariant structural equation models testing the bidirectional relations demonstrated adequate fit for the data. In the case of externalizing symptoms, acculturation mismatch marginally significantly predicted subsequent intergenerational conflict, but acculturation mismatch did not predict externalizing symptoms via intergenerational cultural conflict. By contrast, offspring's internalizing and externalizing symptoms respectively predicted greater self-reported intergenerational cultural conflict, which in turn predicted perceived parent-offspring acculturation mismatch over time. These indirect relations suggested that both internalizing and externalizing symptoms indirectly contributed to greater acculturation mismatch through the presence of intergenerational cultural conflict, but data did not support the acculturation gap-distress theory. Theoretical and clinical implications as they pertain to Asian American emerging adults are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Southern Methodist University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29461073

Citation

Lui, P Priscilla. "Rethinking the Acculturation Gap-distress Theory Among Asian Americans: Testing Bidirectional Indirect Relations." The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, vol. 89, no. 6, 2019, pp. 627-639.
Lui PP. Rethinking the acculturation gap-distress theory among Asian Americans: Testing bidirectional indirect relations. Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2019;89(6):627-639.
Lui, P. P. (2019). Rethinking the acculturation gap-distress theory among Asian Americans: Testing bidirectional indirect relations. The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 89(6), 627-639. https://doi.org/10.1037/ort0000322
Lui PP. Rethinking the Acculturation Gap-distress Theory Among Asian Americans: Testing Bidirectional Indirect Relations. Am J Orthopsychiatry. 2019;89(6):627-639. PubMed PMID: 29461073.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rethinking the acculturation gap-distress theory among Asian Americans: Testing bidirectional indirect relations. A1 - Lui,P Priscilla, Y1 - 2018/02/19/ PY - 2018/2/21/pubmed PY - 2020/4/4/medline PY - 2018/2/21/entrez SP - 627 EP - 639 JF - The American journal of orthopsychiatry JO - Am J Orthopsychiatry VL - 89 IS - 6 N2 - The acculturation gap-distress theory postulates that parent-offspring acculturation mismatch precipitates greater intergenerational conflict in immigrant families, which in turn increases the risk for psychological problems among offspring. Whereas cross-sectional studies have shown support for these theory-informed relations, comparatively little is known about whether acculturation mismatch negatively affects psychological functioning, or whether offspring's psychological problems precipitate greater perceived acculturation mismatch via intergenerational cultural conflict. Furthermore, more research is needed to investigate how acculturation and family conflict affect Asian Americans transitioning into college and emerging adulthood. Across two measurement occasions, two cohorts of Asian American first-year college students (N = 555, Mage = 17.99, 56.0% women) completed survey questionnaires assessing their perception of parent-offspring acculturation discrepancies, acculturation-related intergenerational conflict, and internalizing and externalizing symptoms. For both sets of psychological functioning, gender invariant structural equation models testing the bidirectional relations demonstrated adequate fit for the data. In the case of externalizing symptoms, acculturation mismatch marginally significantly predicted subsequent intergenerational conflict, but acculturation mismatch did not predict externalizing symptoms via intergenerational cultural conflict. By contrast, offspring's internalizing and externalizing symptoms respectively predicted greater self-reported intergenerational cultural conflict, which in turn predicted perceived parent-offspring acculturation mismatch over time. These indirect relations suggested that both internalizing and externalizing symptoms indirectly contributed to greater acculturation mismatch through the presence of intergenerational cultural conflict, but data did not support the acculturation gap-distress theory. Theoretical and clinical implications as they pertain to Asian American emerging adults are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2019 APA, all rights reserved). SN - 1939-0025 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29461073/Rethinking_the_acculturation_gap_distress_theory_among_Asian_Americans:_Testing_bidirectional_indirect_relations_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/ort/89/6/627 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -