Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Behavioral consequences of children with sleep-disordered breathing after adenotonsillectomy.
World J Pediatr. 2018 02; 14(1):57-65.WJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adenotonsillectomy (AT) has been an effective treatment for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children, and several studies described the risk of postoperative weight gain and obesity in children treated with AT. The present study aimed to evaluate behavioral improvements in children with SDB one year after adenotonsillectomy and to investigate an influence of postoperative weight gain on behaviors.

METHODS

The study included 170 children aged 5-11 years who underwent adenotonsillectomy for SDB and 150 controls. Body mass index percentile was obtained for age and gender, and parental sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) questionnaire was used to assess the severity of SDB. Psychological assessment was performed pre- and post-adenotonsillectomy using standardized questionnaires including strength and difficulties questionnaire, children's depression inventory and screen for child anxiety-related emotional disorder.

RESULTS

The mean age of 170 patients was 7.7 ± 1.5 years with 73 (42.9%) girls and 97 (57.1%) boys. The mean follow-up period were 15.4 ± 2.7 months. The patients had shown significant improvements in SDB scores as well as in questionnaire-based behavioral problems after adenotonsillectomy. The odds of a child being overweight were significantly increased after adenotonsillectomy. Less improvements in hyperactivity and conduct problems were observed in the patients with older ages, higher SRBD scores, and overweight/obesity at 1-year follow-up after adenotonsillectomy.

CONCLUSION

These data suggest that abnormal behavioral outcomes should be evaluated postoperatively, which potentially could be reduced with the early adenotonsillectomy and adequate postoperative weight control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Otorhinolaryngology Department, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.Otorhinolaryngology Department, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea.Otorhinolaryngology Department, CHA University, Seongnam, Korea. hyoungkim1024@gmail.com. Otorhinolaryngology Department, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, 351 Yatap-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, 463-712, Korea. hyoungkim1024@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29464577

Citation

Kim, Ji Yoon, et al. "Behavioral Consequences of Children With Sleep-disordered Breathing After Adenotonsillectomy." World Journal of Pediatrics : WJP, vol. 14, no. 1, 2018, pp. 57-65.
Kim JY, Lee CH, Kim HM. Behavioral consequences of children with sleep-disordered breathing after adenotonsillectomy. World J Pediatr. 2018;14(1):57-65.
Kim, J. Y., Lee, C. H., & Kim, H. M. (2018). Behavioral consequences of children with sleep-disordered breathing after adenotonsillectomy. World Journal of Pediatrics : WJP, 14(1), 57-65. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12519-017-0108-4
Kim JY, Lee CH, Kim HM. Behavioral Consequences of Children With Sleep-disordered Breathing After Adenotonsillectomy. World J Pediatr. 2018;14(1):57-65. PubMed PMID: 29464577.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Behavioral consequences of children with sleep-disordered breathing after adenotonsillectomy. AU - Kim,Ji Yoon, AU - Lee,Chang Ho, AU - Kim,Hyoung-Mi, Y1 - 2018/02/20/ PY - 2016/07/22/received PY - 2017/03/03/accepted PY - 2018/2/22/pubmed PY - 2018/10/16/medline PY - 2018/2/22/entrez KW - Obesity KW - Obstructive sleep apnea KW - Pediatric KW - Snoring KW - Tonsillectomy SP - 57 EP - 65 JF - World journal of pediatrics : WJP JO - World J Pediatr VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adenotonsillectomy (AT) has been an effective treatment for sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children, and several studies described the risk of postoperative weight gain and obesity in children treated with AT. The present study aimed to evaluate behavioral improvements in children with SDB one year after adenotonsillectomy and to investigate an influence of postoperative weight gain on behaviors. METHODS: The study included 170 children aged 5-11 years who underwent adenotonsillectomy for SDB and 150 controls. Body mass index percentile was obtained for age and gender, and parental sleep-related breathing disorder (SRBD) questionnaire was used to assess the severity of SDB. Psychological assessment was performed pre- and post-adenotonsillectomy using standardized questionnaires including strength and difficulties questionnaire, children's depression inventory and screen for child anxiety-related emotional disorder. RESULTS: The mean age of 170 patients was 7.7 ± 1.5 years with 73 (42.9%) girls and 97 (57.1%) boys. The mean follow-up period were 15.4 ± 2.7 months. The patients had shown significant improvements in SDB scores as well as in questionnaire-based behavioral problems after adenotonsillectomy. The odds of a child being overweight were significantly increased after adenotonsillectomy. Less improvements in hyperactivity and conduct problems were observed in the patients with older ages, higher SRBD scores, and overweight/obesity at 1-year follow-up after adenotonsillectomy. CONCLUSION: These data suggest that abnormal behavioral outcomes should be evaluated postoperatively, which potentially could be reduced with the early adenotonsillectomy and adequate postoperative weight control. SN - 1867-0687 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29464577/Behavioral_consequences_of_children_with_sleep_disordered_breathing_after_adenotonsillectomy_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12519-017-0108-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -