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Type of dietary fat intakes in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in US adults: an iso-energetic substitution analysis from the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry.
Br J Nutr. 2018 02; 119(4):456-463.BJ

Abstract

Accumulating evidence indicates that saturated fat intake is related to mortality risk increase, whereas unsaturated fat intake is associated with reduced mortality risk. The aim of the present study was to estimate the mortality risk reduction related to a dietary change from saturated fat to mono- or polyunsaturated fat intake. The American National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted between 1999 and 2010 were linked to the 2011 national US death registry resulting in an observational prospective mortality study. Proportional hazards Cox models were used to evaluate the association between saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Substitution analysis was conducted to estimate an iso-energetic substitution of 10 % of the energy from dietary fat intake applied to the substitution of saturated fat with an equal amount of energy from monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat. The highest tertile intakes of saturated fat resulted in an increased risk (12 %) of all-cause and specific-cause mortality, whereas the highest tertile intakes of polyunsaturated fat resulted in a reduced risk (7 %) of all-cause and specific-cause mortality when compared with the corresponding lowest tertile. Iso-energetic substitution revealed that a substitution of 10 % of energy (from total fat) from saturated fat to an equal amount of energy from monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat resulted in a significant reduction of the mortality risk ranging from 4 to 8 %. Iso-energetic substitution of saturated fat with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat reduced all-cause and specific-cause mortality in US adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Centre of Excellence for Nutrition (CEN),North-West University,Potchefstroom 2520,South Africa.1Centre of Excellence for Nutrition (CEN),North-West University,Potchefstroom 2520,South Africa.1Centre of Excellence for Nutrition (CEN),North-West University,Potchefstroom 2520,South Africa.1Centre of Excellence for Nutrition (CEN),North-West University,Potchefstroom 2520,South Africa.1Centre of Excellence for Nutrition (CEN),North-West University,Potchefstroom 2520,South Africa.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29498349

Citation

Ricci, Cristian, et al. "Type of Dietary Fat Intakes in Relation to All-cause and Cause-specific Mortality in US Adults: an Iso-energetic Substitution Analysis From the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Linked to the US Mortality Registry." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 119, no. 4, 2018, pp. 456-463.
Ricci C, Baumgartner J, Zec M, et al. Type of dietary fat intakes in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in US adults: an iso-energetic substitution analysis from the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry. Br J Nutr. 2018;119(4):456-463.
Ricci, C., Baumgartner, J., Zec, M., Kruger, H. S., & Smuts, C. M. (2018). Type of dietary fat intakes in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in US adults: an iso-energetic substitution analysis from the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry. The British Journal of Nutrition, 119(4), 456-463. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114517003889
Ricci C, et al. Type of Dietary Fat Intakes in Relation to All-cause and Cause-specific Mortality in US Adults: an Iso-energetic Substitution Analysis From the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey Linked to the US Mortality Registry. Br J Nutr. 2018;119(4):456-463. PubMed PMID: 29498349.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Type of dietary fat intakes in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality in US adults: an iso-energetic substitution analysis from the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey linked to the US mortality registry. AU - Ricci,Cristian, AU - Baumgartner,Jeannine, AU - Zec,Manja, AU - Kruger,Herculina Salome, AU - Smuts,Cornelius M, PY - 2018/3/3/entrez PY - 2018/3/3/pubmed PY - 2019/2/12/medline KW - NHANES National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey KW - All-cause mortality KW - Dietary fats KW - Specific mortality KW - Substitution analyses SP - 456 EP - 463 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 119 IS - 4 N2 - Accumulating evidence indicates that saturated fat intake is related to mortality risk increase, whereas unsaturated fat intake is associated with reduced mortality risk. The aim of the present study was to estimate the mortality risk reduction related to a dietary change from saturated fat to mono- or polyunsaturated fat intake. The American National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys conducted between 1999 and 2010 were linked to the 2011 national US death registry resulting in an observational prospective mortality study. Proportional hazards Cox models were used to evaluate the association between saturated, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Substitution analysis was conducted to estimate an iso-energetic substitution of 10 % of the energy from dietary fat intake applied to the substitution of saturated fat with an equal amount of energy from monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat. The highest tertile intakes of saturated fat resulted in an increased risk (12 %) of all-cause and specific-cause mortality, whereas the highest tertile intakes of polyunsaturated fat resulted in a reduced risk (7 %) of all-cause and specific-cause mortality when compared with the corresponding lowest tertile. Iso-energetic substitution revealed that a substitution of 10 % of energy (from total fat) from saturated fat to an equal amount of energy from monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fat resulted in a significant reduction of the mortality risk ranging from 4 to 8 %. Iso-energetic substitution of saturated fat with monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat reduced all-cause and specific-cause mortality in US adults. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29498349/Type_of_dietary_fat_intakes_in_relation_to_all_cause_and_cause_specific_mortality_in_US_adults:_an_iso_energetic_substitution_analysis_from_the_American_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_linked_to_the_US_mortality_registry_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114517003889/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -