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Socioeconomic Status Associated With Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion in Japan: NIPPON DATA2010.
J Epidemiol. 2018; 28 Suppl 3:S29-S34.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although socioeconomic status (SES) may affect food and nutrient intakes, few studies have reported on sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intakes among individuals with various SESs in Japan. We investigated associations of SES with Na and K intake levels using urinary specimens in a representative Japanese population.

METHODS

This was a cross-sectional study of 2,560 men and women (the NIPPON DATA2010 cohort) who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Survey Japan in 2010. Casual urine was used to calculate estimated excretion in 24-hour urinary Na (E24hr-Na) and K (E24hr-K). The urinary sodium-to-potassium (Na/K) ratio was calculated from casual urinary electrolyte values. An analysis of covariance was performed to investigate associations of aspects of SES, including equivalent household expenditure (EHE), educational attainment, and job category, with E24hr-Na, E24hr-K, and the Na/K ratio for men and women separately. A stratified analysis was performed on educational attainment and the job category for younger (<65 years) and older (≥65 years) participants.

RESULTS

In men and women, average E24hr-Na was 176.2 mmol/day and 172.3, average E24hr-K was 42.5 and 41.3, and the average Na/K ratio was 3.61 and 3.68, respectively. Lower EHE was associated with a higher Na/K ratio in women and lower E24hr-K in men and women. A shorter education was associated with a higher Na/K ratio in women and younger men, and lower E24hr-K in older men and women.

CONCLUSION

Lower EHE and a shorter education were associated with a lower K intake and higher Na/K ratio estimated from casual urine specimens in Japanese men and women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science.Department of Health and Nutrition, University of Human Arts and Sciences.Medical Research Institute, Kanazawa Medical University.Department of International Island and Community Medicine, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences.International Center for Nutrition and Information, National Institute of Health and Nutrition, National Institutes of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition.Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science.Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science.Department of Hygiene and Public Health, Teikyo University School of Medicine.Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science. Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Keio University School of Medicine.Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science. Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science.Research Institute of Strategy for Prevention.Department of Public Health, Shiga University of Medical Science. Center for Epidemiologic Research in Asia, Shiga University of Medical Science.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29503383

Citation

Miyagawa, Naoko, et al. "Socioeconomic Status Associated With Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion in Japan: NIPPON DATA2010." Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 28 Suppl 3, 2018, pp. S29-S34.
Miyagawa N, Okuda N, Nakagawa H, et al. Socioeconomic Status Associated With Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion in Japan: NIPPON DATA2010. J Epidemiol. 2018;28 Suppl 3:S29-S34.
Miyagawa, N., Okuda, N., Nakagawa, H., Takezaki, T., Nishi, N., Takashima, N., Fujiyoshi, A., Ohkubo, T., Kadota, A., Okamura, T., Ueshima, H., Okayama, A., & Miura, K. (2018). Socioeconomic Status Associated With Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion in Japan: NIPPON DATA2010. Journal of Epidemiology, 28 Suppl 3, S29-S34. https://doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20170253
Miyagawa N, et al. Socioeconomic Status Associated With Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion in Japan: NIPPON DATA2010. J Epidemiol. 2018;28 Suppl 3:S29-S34. PubMed PMID: 29503383.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Socioeconomic Status Associated With Urinary Sodium and Potassium Excretion in Japan: NIPPON DATA2010. AU - Miyagawa,Naoko, AU - Okuda,Nagako, AU - Nakagawa,Hideaki, AU - Takezaki,Toshiro, AU - Nishi,Nobuo, AU - Takashima,Naoyuki, AU - Fujiyoshi,Akira, AU - Ohkubo,Takayoshi, AU - Kadota,Aya, AU - Okamura,Tomonori, AU - Ueshima,Hirotsugu, AU - Okayama,Akira, AU - Miura,Katsuyuki, PY - 2018/3/6/entrez PY - 2018/3/6/pubmed PY - 2018/6/27/medline KW - potassium KW - socioeconomic status KW - sodium KW - sodium-to-potassium ratio KW - urine SP - S29 EP - S34 JF - Journal of epidemiology JO - J Epidemiol VL - 28 Suppl 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although socioeconomic status (SES) may affect food and nutrient intakes, few studies have reported on sodium (Na) and potassium (K) intakes among individuals with various SESs in Japan. We investigated associations of SES with Na and K intake levels using urinary specimens in a representative Japanese population. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 2,560 men and women (the NIPPON DATA2010 cohort) who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Survey Japan in 2010. Casual urine was used to calculate estimated excretion in 24-hour urinary Na (E24hr-Na) and K (E24hr-K). The urinary sodium-to-potassium (Na/K) ratio was calculated from casual urinary electrolyte values. An analysis of covariance was performed to investigate associations of aspects of SES, including equivalent household expenditure (EHE), educational attainment, and job category, with E24hr-Na, E24hr-K, and the Na/K ratio for men and women separately. A stratified analysis was performed on educational attainment and the job category for younger (<65 years) and older (≥65 years) participants. RESULTS: In men and women, average E24hr-Na was 176.2 mmol/day and 172.3, average E24hr-K was 42.5 and 41.3, and the average Na/K ratio was 3.61 and 3.68, respectively. Lower EHE was associated with a higher Na/K ratio in women and lower E24hr-K in men and women. A shorter education was associated with a higher Na/K ratio in women and younger men, and lower E24hr-K in older men and women. CONCLUSION: Lower EHE and a shorter education were associated with a lower K intake and higher Na/K ratio estimated from casual urine specimens in Japanese men and women. SN - 1349-9092 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29503383/Socioeconomic_Status_Associated_With_Urinary_Sodium_and_Potassium_Excretion_in_Japan:_NIPPON_DATA2010_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.2188/jea.JE20170253 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -