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Rapid detection of MERS coronavirus-like viruses in bats: pote1ntial for tracking MERS coronavirus transmission and animal origin.
Emerg Microbes Infect. 2018 Mar 07; 7(1):18.EM

Abstract

Recently, we developed a monoclonal antibody-based rapid nucleocapsid protein detection assay for diagnosis of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in humans and dromedary camels. In this study, we examined the usefulness of this assay to detect other lineage C betacoronaviruses closely related to MERS-CoV in bats. The rapid MERS-CoV nucleocapsid protein detection assay was tested positive in 24 (88.9%) of 27 Tylonycteris bat CoV HKU4 (Ty-BatCoV-HKU4) RNA-positive alimentary samples of Tylonycteris pachypus and 4 (19.0%) of 21 Pipistrellus bat CoV HKU5 (Pi-BatCoV-HKU5) RNA-positive alimentary samples of Pipistrellus abramus. There was significantly more Ty-BatCoV-HKU4 RNA-positive alimentary samples than Pi-BatCoV-HKU5 RNA-positive alimentary samples that were tested positive by the rapid MERS-CoV nucleocapsid protein detection assay (P < 0.001 by Chi-square test). The rapid assay was tested negative in all 51 alimentary samples RNA-positive for alphacoronaviruses (Rhinolophus bat CoV HKU2, Myotis bat CoV HKU6, Miniopterus bat CoV HKU8 and Hipposideros batCoV HKU10) and 32 alimentary samples positive for lineage B (SARS-related Rhinolophus bat CoV HKU3) and lineage D (Rousettus bat CoV HKU9) betacoronaviruses. No significant difference was observed between the viral loads of Ty-BatCoV-HKU4/Pi-BatCoV-HKU5 RNA-positive alimentary samples that were tested positive and negative by the rapid test (Mann-Witney U test). The rapid MERS-CoV nucleocapsid protein detection assay is able to rapidly detect lineage C betacoronaviruses in bats. It detected significantly more Ty-BatCoV-HKU4 than Pi-BatCoV-HKU5 because MERS-CoV is more closely related to Ty-BatCoV-HKU4 than Pi-BatCoV-HKU5. This assay will facilitate rapid on-site mass screening of animal samples for ancestors of MERS-CoV and tracking transmission in the related bat species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. pcywoo@hku.hk. Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. pcywoo@hku.hk. Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. pcywoo@hku.hk. Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. pcywoo@hku.hk.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. skplau@hku.hk. Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. skplau@hku.hk. Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. skplau@hku.hk. Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. skplau@hku.hk.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics & National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, School of Life Sciences, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361102, Fujian, China.Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.Guangdong Key Laboratory of Animal Conservation and Resource Utilization, Guangdong Public Laboratory of Wild Animal Conservation and Utilization, Guangdong Institute of Applied Biological Resources, Guangzhou, China.State Key Laboratory of Molecular Vaccinology and Molecular Diagnostics & National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, School of Life Sciences, School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, 361102, Fujian, China.State Key Laboratory of Emerging Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Research Centre of Infection and Immunology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. Department of Microbiology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29511173

Citation

Woo, Patrick C Y., et al. "Rapid Detection of MERS Coronavirus-like Viruses in Bats: Pote1ntial for Tracking MERS Coronavirus Transmission and Animal Origin." Emerging Microbes & Infections, vol. 7, no. 1, 2018, p. 18.
Woo PCY, Lau SKP, Chen Y, et al. Rapid detection of MERS coronavirus-like viruses in bats: pote1ntial for tracking MERS coronavirus transmission and animal origin. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2018;7(1):18.
Woo, P. C. Y., Lau, S. K. P., Chen, Y., Wong, E. Y. M., Chan, K. H., Chen, H., Zhang, L., Xia, N., & Yuen, K. Y. (2018). Rapid detection of MERS coronavirus-like viruses in bats: pote1ntial for tracking MERS coronavirus transmission and animal origin. Emerging Microbes & Infections, 7(1), 18. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41426-017-0016-7
Woo PCY, et al. Rapid Detection of MERS Coronavirus-like Viruses in Bats: Pote1ntial for Tracking MERS Coronavirus Transmission and Animal Origin. Emerg Microbes Infect. 2018 Mar 7;7(1):18. PubMed PMID: 29511173.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Rapid detection of MERS coronavirus-like viruses in bats: pote1ntial for tracking MERS coronavirus transmission and animal origin. AU - Woo,Patrick C Y, AU - Lau,Susanna K P, AU - Chen,Yixin, AU - Wong,Emily Y M, AU - Chan,Kwok-Hung, AU - Chen,Honglin, AU - Zhang,Libiao, AU - Xia,Ningshao, AU - Yuen,Kwok-Yung, Y1 - 2018/03/07/ PY - 2017/07/14/received PY - 2017/12/14/accepted PY - 2017/11/28/revised PY - 2018/3/8/entrez PY - 2018/3/8/pubmed PY - 2018/8/21/medline SP - 18 EP - 18 JF - Emerging microbes & infections JO - Emerg Microbes Infect VL - 7 IS - 1 N2 - Recently, we developed a monoclonal antibody-based rapid nucleocapsid protein detection assay for diagnosis of MERS coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in humans and dromedary camels. In this study, we examined the usefulness of this assay to detect other lineage C betacoronaviruses closely related to MERS-CoV in bats. The rapid MERS-CoV nucleocapsid protein detection assay was tested positive in 24 (88.9%) of 27 Tylonycteris bat CoV HKU4 (Ty-BatCoV-HKU4) RNA-positive alimentary samples of Tylonycteris pachypus and 4 (19.0%) of 21 Pipistrellus bat CoV HKU5 (Pi-BatCoV-HKU5) RNA-positive alimentary samples of Pipistrellus abramus. There was significantly more Ty-BatCoV-HKU4 RNA-positive alimentary samples than Pi-BatCoV-HKU5 RNA-positive alimentary samples that were tested positive by the rapid MERS-CoV nucleocapsid protein detection assay (P < 0.001 by Chi-square test). The rapid assay was tested negative in all 51 alimentary samples RNA-positive for alphacoronaviruses (Rhinolophus bat CoV HKU2, Myotis bat CoV HKU6, Miniopterus bat CoV HKU8 and Hipposideros batCoV HKU10) and 32 alimentary samples positive for lineage B (SARS-related Rhinolophus bat CoV HKU3) and lineage D (Rousettus bat CoV HKU9) betacoronaviruses. No significant difference was observed between the viral loads of Ty-BatCoV-HKU4/Pi-BatCoV-HKU5 RNA-positive alimentary samples that were tested positive and negative by the rapid test (Mann-Witney U test). The rapid MERS-CoV nucleocapsid protein detection assay is able to rapidly detect lineage C betacoronaviruses in bats. It detected significantly more Ty-BatCoV-HKU4 than Pi-BatCoV-HKU5 because MERS-CoV is more closely related to Ty-BatCoV-HKU4 than Pi-BatCoV-HKU5. This assay will facilitate rapid on-site mass screening of animal samples for ancestors of MERS-CoV and tracking transmission in the related bat species. SN - 2222-1751 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29511173/Rapid_detection_of_MERS_coronavirus_like_viruses_in_bats:_pote1ntial_for_tracking_MERS_coronavirus_transmission_and_animal_origin_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1038/s41426-017-0016-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -