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Evaluation of Malaria Urban Risk Using an Immuno-Epidemiological Biomarker of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018 05; 98(5):1353-1359.AJ

Abstract

Urban malaria is an underestimated serious health concern in African countries. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of malaria transmission in an urban area by evaluating the level of human exposure to Anopheles bites using an Anopheles salivary biomarker (gambiae Salivary Gland Protein-6 peptide 1 [gSG6-P1] peptide). Two multidisciplinary cross-sectional studies were undertaken in five sites of Bouaké city (three urban districts and two surrounding villages, used as control; Côte d'Ivoire) during the rainy season and the dry season. Blood samples were obtained from children 6 months to 14 years of age for immunological tests. The level of anti-gSG6-P1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies was significantly higher in the rainy season than the dry season in both urban and rural sites (P < 0.0001). Interestingly, children with the highest anti-gSG6-P1 IgG responses in the rainy season were infected by Plasmodium falciparum. Surprisingly, no difference of anti-gSG6-P1 IgG level was observed between urban and rural areas, for either season. The current data suggest that children in the urban city of Bouaké could be as highly exposed to Anopheles bites as children living in surrounding villages. The immunological biomarker of human exposure to Anopheles bites may be used to accurately assess the potential risk of malaria transmission in African urban settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unité de Formation et de Recherche des Sciences de la nature (UFR SN) Université Nangui Abrogoua, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire. Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs: Ecologie, Génétique, Evolution et Contrôle (MIVEGEC), UMR IRD.224-CNRS.5290, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France.Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs: Ecologie, Génétique, Evolution et Contrôle (MIVEGEC), UMR IRD.224-CNRS.5290, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Unité de Formation et de Recherche Biosciences (UFR Biosciences), Université Félix Houphouët Boigny, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Unité de Formation et de Recherche Biosciences (UFR Biosciences), Université Félix Houphouët Boigny, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire. Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs: Ecologie, Génétique, Evolution et Contrôle (MIVEGEC), UMR IRD.224-CNRS.5290, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.Unité de Formation et de Recherche des Sciences de la nature (UFR SN) Université Nangui Abrogoua, Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire.Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), Maladies Infectieuses et Vecteurs: Ecologie, Génétique, Evolution et Contrôle (MIVEGEC), UMR IRD.224-CNRS.5290, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France. Institut Pierre Richet (IPR), Institut Nationale de la Santé Publique (INSP), Bouaké, Côte d'Ivoire.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29512479

Citation

Traoré, Dipomin F., et al. "Evaluation of Malaria Urban Risk Using an Immuno-Epidemiological Biomarker of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 98, no. 5, 2018, pp. 1353-1359.
Traoré DF, Sagna AB, Adja AM, et al. Evaluation of Malaria Urban Risk Using an Immuno-Epidemiological Biomarker of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018;98(5):1353-1359.
Traoré, D. F., Sagna, A. B., Adja, A. M., Zoh, D. D., Lingué, K. N., Coulibaly, I., N'Cho Tchiekoi, B., Assi, S. B., Poinsignon, A., Dagnogo, M., & Remoue, F. (2018). Evaluation of Malaria Urban Risk Using an Immuno-Epidemiological Biomarker of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 98(5), 1353-1359. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0231
Traoré DF, et al. Evaluation of Malaria Urban Risk Using an Immuno-Epidemiological Biomarker of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2018;98(5):1353-1359. PubMed PMID: 29512479.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of Malaria Urban Risk Using an Immuno-Epidemiological Biomarker of Human Exposure to Anopheles Bites. AU - Traoré,Dipomin F, AU - Sagna,André B, AU - Adja,Akré M, AU - Zoh,Dounin D, AU - Lingué,Kouassi N, AU - Coulibaly,Issa, AU - N'Cho Tchiekoi,Bertin, AU - Assi,Serge B, AU - Poinsignon,Anne, AU - Dagnogo,Mamadou, AU - Remoue,Franck, Y1 - 2018/03/01/ PY - 2018/3/8/pubmed PY - 2019/7/16/medline PY - 2018/3/8/entrez SP - 1353 EP - 1359 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 98 IS - 5 N2 - Urban malaria is an underestimated serious health concern in African countries. This study aimed to evaluate the risk of malaria transmission in an urban area by evaluating the level of human exposure to Anopheles bites using an Anopheles salivary biomarker (gambiae Salivary Gland Protein-6 peptide 1 [gSG6-P1] peptide). Two multidisciplinary cross-sectional studies were undertaken in five sites of Bouaké city (three urban districts and two surrounding villages, used as control; Côte d'Ivoire) during the rainy season and the dry season. Blood samples were obtained from children 6 months to 14 years of age for immunological tests. The level of anti-gSG6-P1 immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies was significantly higher in the rainy season than the dry season in both urban and rural sites (P < 0.0001). Interestingly, children with the highest anti-gSG6-P1 IgG responses in the rainy season were infected by Plasmodium falciparum. Surprisingly, no difference of anti-gSG6-P1 IgG level was observed between urban and rural areas, for either season. The current data suggest that children in the urban city of Bouaké could be as highly exposed to Anopheles bites as children living in surrounding villages. The immunological biomarker of human exposure to Anopheles bites may be used to accurately assess the potential risk of malaria transmission in African urban settings. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29512479/Evaluation_of_Malaria_Urban_Risk_Using_an_Immuno_Epidemiological_Biomarker_of_Human_Exposure_to_Anopheles_Bites_ L2 - https://ajtmh.org/doi/10.4269/ajtmh.17-0231 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -