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Long-term effect of prenatal exposure to malnutrition on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood: Evidence from the Chinese famine of 1959-1961.
Eur Psychiatry 2018; 51:42-47EP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Schizophrenia is a common major mental disorder and prenatal nutritional deficiency may increase its risk. We aimed to investigate long-term impact of prenatal exposure to malnutrition on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood using the Chinese famine of 1959-1961 as a natural experiment.

METHODS

We obtained data from the Second National Sample Survey on Disability implemented in 31 provinces in 2006, and restricted our analysis to 387,093 individuals born from 1956 to 1965. Schizophrenia was ascertained by psychiatrists based on the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Famine severity was defined as cohort size shrinkage index. The famine effect on adult schizophrenia was estimated by difference-in-difference models, established by examining the variations of famine exposure across birth cohorts.

RESULTS

Compared with the reference cohort of 1965, famine cohorts (1959-1962) had significantly higher odds (OR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.13, 3.00; P = 0.014) of schizophrenia in the rural population. After adjusting for multiple covariates, this association remained significant (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.98; P = 0.018). We did not observe statistically significant differences in odds of schizophrenia among famine cohorts compared with the reference cohort in the urban population.

CONCLUSIONS

Prenatal malnutrition exposure has a detrimental impact on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood in the rural population. Further studies were needed to investigate corresponding mechanisms on this topic.

Authors+Show Affiliations

China Center for Health Development Studies, Peking University, Beijing, China; Institute of Population Research, Peking University, Beijing, China; Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, MD, United States.Institute of Population Research, Peking University, Beijing, China.Institute of Population Research, Peking University, Beijing, China; APEC Health Science Academy (HeSAY), Peking University, Beijing, China.Institute of Population Research, Peking University, Beijing, China.Institute of Population Research, Peking University, Beijing, China.Institute of Population Research, Peking University, Beijing, China; APEC Health Science Academy (HeSAY), Peking University, Beijing, China. Electronic address: xzheng@pku.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29514118

Citation

He, Ping, et al. "Long-term Effect of Prenatal Exposure to Malnutrition On Risk of Schizophrenia in Adulthood: Evidence From the Chinese Famine of 1959-1961." European Psychiatry : the Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists, vol. 51, 2018, pp. 42-47.
He P, Chen G, Guo C, et al. Long-term effect of prenatal exposure to malnutrition on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood: Evidence from the Chinese famine of 1959-1961. Eur Psychiatry. 2018;51:42-47.
He, P., Chen, G., Guo, C., Wen, X., Song, X., & Zheng, X. (2018). Long-term effect of prenatal exposure to malnutrition on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood: Evidence from the Chinese famine of 1959-1961. European Psychiatry : the Journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists, 51, pp. 42-47. doi:10.1016/j.eurpsy.2018.01.003.
He P, et al. Long-term Effect of Prenatal Exposure to Malnutrition On Risk of Schizophrenia in Adulthood: Evidence From the Chinese Famine of 1959-1961. Eur Psychiatry. 2018;51:42-47. PubMed PMID: 29514118.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term effect of prenatal exposure to malnutrition on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood: Evidence from the Chinese famine of 1959-1961. AU - He,Ping, AU - Chen,Gong, AU - Guo,Chao, AU - Wen,Xu, AU - Song,Xinming, AU - Zheng,Xiaoying, Y1 - 2018/03/04/ PY - 2017/08/21/received PY - 2018/01/09/revised PY - 2018/01/15/accepted PY - 2018/3/8/pubmed PY - 2018/3/8/medline PY - 2018/3/8/entrez KW - Famine KW - Malnutrition KW - Natural experiment KW - Schizophrenia SP - 42 EP - 47 JF - European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists JO - Eur. Psychiatry VL - 51 N2 - BACKGROUND: Schizophrenia is a common major mental disorder and prenatal nutritional deficiency may increase its risk. We aimed to investigate long-term impact of prenatal exposure to malnutrition on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood using the Chinese famine of 1959-1961 as a natural experiment. METHODS: We obtained data from the Second National Sample Survey on Disability implemented in 31 provinces in 2006, and restricted our analysis to 387,093 individuals born from 1956 to 1965. Schizophrenia was ascertained by psychiatrists based on the International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Famine severity was defined as cohort size shrinkage index. The famine effect on adult schizophrenia was estimated by difference-in-difference models, established by examining the variations of famine exposure across birth cohorts. RESULTS: Compared with the reference cohort of 1965, famine cohorts (1959-1962) had significantly higher odds (OR: 1.84; 95% CI: 1.13, 3.00; P = 0.014) of schizophrenia in the rural population. After adjusting for multiple covariates, this association remained significant (OR: 1.82; 95% CI: 1.11, 2.98; P = 0.018). We did not observe statistically significant differences in odds of schizophrenia among famine cohorts compared with the reference cohort in the urban population. CONCLUSIONS: Prenatal malnutrition exposure has a detrimental impact on risk of schizophrenia in adulthood in the rural population. Further studies were needed to investigate corresponding mechanisms on this topic. SN - 1778-3585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29514118/Long_term_effect_of_prenatal_exposure_to_malnutrition_on_risk_of_schizophrenia_in_adulthood:_Evidence_from_the_Chinese_famine_of_1959_1961_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0924-9338(18)30003-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -