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Do dietary patterns determine levels of vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12 intake and corresponding biomarkers in European adolescents? The Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study.
Nutrition. 2018 06; 50:8-17.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine dietary patterns (DPs) and explain the highest variance of vitamin B6, folate, and B12 intake and related concentrations among European adolescents.

METHODS

A total of 2173 adolescents who participated in the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study met the eligibility criteria for the vitamin B intake analysis (46% boys) and 586 adolescents for the biomarkers analysis (47% boys). Two non-consecutive, 24-h, dietary recalls were used to assess the mean intakes. Concentrations were measured by chromatography and immunoassay testing. A reduced rank regression was applied to elucidate the combined effect of food intake of vitamin B and related concentrations.

RESULTS

The identified DPs (one per vitamin B intake and biomarker and by sex) explained a variability between 34.2% and 23.7% of the vitamin B intake and between 17.2% and 7% of the biomarkers. In the reduced rank regression models, fish, eggs, cheese, whole milk and buttermilk intakes were loaded positively for vitamin B intake in both sexes; however, soft drinks and chocolate were loaded negatively. For the biomarkers, a higher variability was observed in the patterns in terms of food loads such as alcoholic drinks, sugars, and soft drinks. Some food items were loaded differently between intakes and biomarkers such as fish products, which was loaded positively for intakes but negatively for plasma folate in girls.

CONCLUSIONS

The identified DPs explained up to 34.2% and 17.2% of the variability of the vitamin B intake and plasma concentrations, respectively, in European adolescents. Further studies are needed to elucidate the factors that determine such patterns.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Aragón, Spain; Red de Salud Materno-infantil y del Desarrollo (SAMID), Barakaldo, Spain. Electronic address: Iglesia@unizar.es.Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France.Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain.Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Fundación Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Aragón, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Madrid, Spain.Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, School of Health Science and Education, Harokopio University, Athens, Greece.Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Granada, Granada, Spain.University of Crete School of Medicine, Crete, Greece.Université de Lille, Clinical Investigation Centre, Lille, France.Immunonutrition Research Group, Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Madrid, Spain.CREA, Research Centre for Food and Nutrition, Rome, Italy.University of Crete School of Medicine, Crete, Greece.Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.Department of Pediatrics, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.Division of Clinical Nutrition and Prevention, Department of Pediatrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.Research Institute of Child Nutrition, Pediatric University Clinic, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany.Department of Public Health, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development (GENUD) Research group, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain; Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón (IA2), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Aragón (IIS Aragón), Aragón, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERObn), Madrid, Spain.ImFINE Research Group, Department of Health and Human Performance, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29518603

Citation

Iglesia, Iris, et al. "Do Dietary Patterns Determine Levels of Vitamin B6, Folate, and Vitamin B12 Intake and Corresponding Biomarkers in European Adolescents? the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe By Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) Study." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 50, 2018, pp. 8-17.
Iglesia I, Huybrechts I, Mouratidou T, et al. Do dietary patterns determine levels of vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12 intake and corresponding biomarkers in European adolescents? The Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study. Nutrition. 2018;50:8-17.
Iglesia, I., Huybrechts, I., Mouratidou, T., Santabárbara, J., Fernández-Alvira, J. M., Santaliestra-Pasías, A. M., Manios, Y., De la O Puerta, A., Kafatos, A., Gottrand, F., Marcos, A., Sette, S., Plada, M., Stehle, P., Molnár, D., Widhalm, K., Kersting, M., De Henauw, S., Moreno, L. A., & González-Gross, M. (2018). Do dietary patterns determine levels of vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12 intake and corresponding biomarkers in European adolescents? The Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 50, 8-17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2017.10.017
Iglesia I, et al. Do Dietary Patterns Determine Levels of Vitamin B6, Folate, and Vitamin B12 Intake and Corresponding Biomarkers in European Adolescents? the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe By Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) Study. Nutrition. 2018;50:8-17. PubMed PMID: 29518603.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do dietary patterns determine levels of vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin B12 intake and corresponding biomarkers in European adolescents? The Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) study. AU - Iglesia,Iris, AU - Huybrechts,Inge, AU - Mouratidou,Theodora, AU - Santabárbara,Javier, AU - Fernández-Alvira,Juan M, AU - Santaliestra-Pasías,Alba M, AU - Manios,Yannis, AU - De la O Puerta,Alejandro, AU - Kafatos,Anthony, AU - Gottrand,Frédéric, AU - Marcos,Ascensión, AU - Sette,Stefania, AU - Plada,Maria, AU - Stehle,Peter, AU - Molnár,Dénes, AU - Widhalm,Kurt, AU - Kersting,Mathilde, AU - De Henauw,Stefaan, AU - Moreno,Luis A, AU - González-Gross,Marcela, AU - ,, Y1 - 2017/11/28/ PY - 2016/10/26/received PY - 2017/10/04/revised PY - 2017/10/18/accepted PY - 2018/3/9/pubmed PY - 2019/10/17/medline PY - 2018/3/9/entrez KW - Adolescents KW - Dietary patterns KW - Europe KW - Reduced rank regression KW - Vitamin B SP - 8 EP - 17 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 50 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine dietary patterns (DPs) and explain the highest variance of vitamin B6, folate, and B12 intake and related concentrations among European adolescents. METHODS: A total of 2173 adolescents who participated in the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence study met the eligibility criteria for the vitamin B intake analysis (46% boys) and 586 adolescents for the biomarkers analysis (47% boys). Two non-consecutive, 24-h, dietary recalls were used to assess the mean intakes. Concentrations were measured by chromatography and immunoassay testing. A reduced rank regression was applied to elucidate the combined effect of food intake of vitamin B and related concentrations. RESULTS: The identified DPs (one per vitamin B intake and biomarker and by sex) explained a variability between 34.2% and 23.7% of the vitamin B intake and between 17.2% and 7% of the biomarkers. In the reduced rank regression models, fish, eggs, cheese, whole milk and buttermilk intakes were loaded positively for vitamin B intake in both sexes; however, soft drinks and chocolate were loaded negatively. For the biomarkers, a higher variability was observed in the patterns in terms of food loads such as alcoholic drinks, sugars, and soft drinks. Some food items were loaded differently between intakes and biomarkers such as fish products, which was loaded positively for intakes but negatively for plasma folate in girls. CONCLUSIONS: The identified DPs explained up to 34.2% and 17.2% of the variability of the vitamin B intake and plasma concentrations, respectively, in European adolescents. Further studies are needed to elucidate the factors that determine such patterns. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29518603/Do_dietary_patterns_determine_levels_of_vitamin_B6,_folate,_and_vitamin_B12_intake_and_corresponding_biomarkers_in_European_adolescents_The_Healthy_Lifestyle_in_Europe_by_Nutrition_in_Adolescence_(HELENA)_study L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(17)30245-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -