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Associations between copper and zinc intakes from diet and mortality from cardiovascular disease in a large population-based prospective cohort study.
J Nutr Biochem. 2018 06; 56:126-132.JN

Abstract

Several studies have related cardiovascular disease (CVD) to serum concentrations of copper and zinc but not to their dietary intakes. We thought to examine the association between dietary intakes of copper and zinc with risk of mortality from CVD in a prospective study encompassing 58,646 healthy Japanese men and women aged 40-79 years. The intakes of copper and zinc were determined by a validated self-administered food frequency questionnaire, and their associations with risk of mortality from CVD were evaluated by Cox proportional hazard modelling. During 965, 970 person-years of follow-up between 1989-2009, we documented 3,388 CVD deaths [1,514 from stroke, 702 from coronary heart disease (CHD) and 1,172 from other CVD]. Copper intake was not associated with CHD mortality; however, the multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality from stroke, other CVD and total CVD in the highest versus the lowest quintiles of copper intake among men were 1.78 (1.16-2.77; P-trend=0.007), 1.61 (1.01-2.81; P-trend =0.03) and 1.63 (1.21-2.33; P-trend=0.001), respectively, and those among women were 1.49 (1.00-2.19; P-trend=0.04), 1.59 (1.09-2.55; P-trend =0.02) and 1.36 (1.06-1.69; P-trend=0.01), respectively. Higher intakes of zinc was inversely associated with mortality from CHD in men; 0.68 (0.58-1.03; P-trend=0.05) but not women; 1.13 (0.71- 1.49; P-trend=0.61). No associations were observed with other mortality endpoints. In conclusion, dietary copper intake was positively associated with mortality from CVD in both genders; whereas, higher dietary zinc intake was inversely associated with mortality from CHD in men but not women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita Shi, Osaka 565-0871, Japan; Department of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Minia University, Shalaby land, Minia, 61511, Egypt. Electronic address: ehab@pbhel.med.osaka-u.ac.jp.Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita Shi, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Electronic address: iso@pbhel.med.osaka-u.ac.jp.Department of Public Health Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8575, Japan. Electronic address: yamagishi.kazumas.ge@u.tsukuba.ac.jp.Laboratory of Community Health and Nutrition, Special Course of Food and Health Science, Department of Bioscience, Graduate School of Agriculture, Ehime University, 3-5-7 Tarumi, Matsuyama, Ehime 790-8566, Japan. Electronic address: m_koutatsu_@hotmail.com.Department of Public Health, Dokkyo Medical University, 880 Kitakobayashi, Mibu-machi, Shimotsuga-gun, Tochigi, 321-0293, Japan. Electronic address: umesawa@dokkyomed.ac.jp.Public Health, Department of Social Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 15 Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo, 060-8638, Japan. Electronic address: tamaa@med.hokudai.ac.jp.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29529560

Citation

Eshak, Ehab S., et al. "Associations Between Copper and Zinc Intakes From Diet and Mortality From Cardiovascular Disease in a Large Population-based Prospective Cohort Study." The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, vol. 56, 2018, pp. 126-132.
Eshak ES, Iso H, Yamagishi K, et al. Associations between copper and zinc intakes from diet and mortality from cardiovascular disease in a large population-based prospective cohort study. J Nutr Biochem. 2018;56:126-132.
Eshak, E. S., Iso, H., Yamagishi, K., Maruyama, K., Umesawa, M., & Tamakoshi, A. (2018). Associations between copper and zinc intakes from diet and mortality from cardiovascular disease in a large population-based prospective cohort study. The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 56, 126-132. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jnutbio.2018.02.008
Eshak ES, et al. Associations Between Copper and Zinc Intakes From Diet and Mortality From Cardiovascular Disease in a Large Population-based Prospective Cohort Study. J Nutr Biochem. 2018;56:126-132. PubMed PMID: 29529560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between copper and zinc intakes from diet and mortality from cardiovascular disease in a large population-based prospective cohort study. AU - Eshak,Ehab S, AU - Iso,Hiroyasu, AU - Yamagishi,Kazumasa, AU - Maruyama,Koutatsu, AU - Umesawa,Mitsumasa, AU - Tamakoshi,Akiko, Y1 - 2018/02/13/ PY - 2017/06/26/received PY - 2017/12/05/revised PY - 2018/02/06/accepted PY - 2018/3/13/pubmed PY - 2019/9/5/medline PY - 2018/3/13/entrez KW - Cardiovascular diseases KW - Copper KW - Coronary heart disease KW - Japanese KW - Stroke KW - Zinc SP - 126 EP - 132 JF - The Journal of nutritional biochemistry JO - J Nutr Biochem VL - 56 N2 - Several studies have related cardiovascular disease (CVD) to serum concentrations of copper and zinc but not to their dietary intakes. We thought to examine the association between dietary intakes of copper and zinc with risk of mortality from CVD in a prospective study encompassing 58,646 healthy Japanese men and women aged 40-79 years. The intakes of copper and zinc were determined by a validated self-administered food frequency questionnaire, and their associations with risk of mortality from CVD were evaluated by Cox proportional hazard modelling. During 965, 970 person-years of follow-up between 1989-2009, we documented 3,388 CVD deaths [1,514 from stroke, 702 from coronary heart disease (CHD) and 1,172 from other CVD]. Copper intake was not associated with CHD mortality; however, the multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for mortality from stroke, other CVD and total CVD in the highest versus the lowest quintiles of copper intake among men were 1.78 (1.16-2.77; P-trend=0.007), 1.61 (1.01-2.81; P-trend =0.03) and 1.63 (1.21-2.33; P-trend=0.001), respectively, and those among women were 1.49 (1.00-2.19; P-trend=0.04), 1.59 (1.09-2.55; P-trend =0.02) and 1.36 (1.06-1.69; P-trend=0.01), respectively. Higher intakes of zinc was inversely associated with mortality from CHD in men; 0.68 (0.58-1.03; P-trend=0.05) but not women; 1.13 (0.71- 1.49; P-trend=0.61). No associations were observed with other mortality endpoints. In conclusion, dietary copper intake was positively associated with mortality from CVD in both genders; whereas, higher dietary zinc intake was inversely associated with mortality from CHD in men but not women. SN - 1873-4847 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29529560/Associations_between_copper_and_zinc_intakes_from_diet_and_mortality_from_cardiovascular_disease_in_a_large_population_based_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0955-2863(17)30565-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -