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Impact of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe rotavirus diarrhoea in The Gambia.
Vaccine. 2018 11 12; 36(47):7179-7184.V

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Rotavirus vaccines protect against the leading cause of severe childhood diarrhoea, and have been introduced in many low-income African countries. The Gambia introducedRotateq® (RV5) into their national immunization program in 2013. We revieweddata from an active rotavirus sentinel surveillancesitefor early evidence of vaccine impact.

METHODS

We compared rotavirus prevalence in diarrhoeal stool in children< 5 years of age admittedat the Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital sentinel surveillance site before (2013) andafterRV5 introduction (2015-2016) in the Gambia. The rotavirus-percent positive was separately compared for all diarrhoealhospitalizations and for hospitalizations with severe symptoms. Rotavirus prevalence was compared annually for the pre-vaccine year of 2013 with post-vaccine years of 2015 and 2016 using chi-square or Fisher's exact tests and the p-value to establish significant relationship was set at p < 0.05. All analyses were completed in SAS 9.3 (SAS Analytics, North Carolina).

RESULTS

Rotavirus prevalence among all diarrhoeahospitalizations decreased from 22% in 2013 to 11% in 2015 (p = 0.04), while remaining unchanged in 2016 (18%, p = 0.56). For hospitalizations that were clinically severe and/or treated with intravenous fluids (mean of 46 per year), the rotavirus prevalence decreased from 33% in 2013 to 8% in 2015 (p = 0.04), and to 15% in 2016 (p = 0.08). The children with age <1 year accounted for 45% the population infected with rotavirus in both pre and post rotavirus vaccination periods.

CONCLUSIONS

Rotavirus vaccine introduction in the Gambia could be among factors resulting in decreased diarrhea hospitalizations among children at the Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital, particularly those with severe disease. These results support the continuation of rotavirus vaccine and additional monitoring of rotavirus hospitalization trends in the country.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Public Health Laboratories, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Kotu Layout, Kotu, Gambia. Electronic address: sheikbakary@yahoo.com.National Public Health Laboratories, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Kotu Layout, Kotu, Gambia.Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States.Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States.Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Banjul, Gambia.National Public Health Laboratories, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Kotu Layout, Kotu, Gambia; University of Noguchi, Ghana.National Public Health Laboratories, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Kotu Layout, Kotu, Gambia.ExpandedProgrammes in Immunization, Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Kotu Layout, Kotu, Gambia.Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, Banjul, Gambia.World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.Division of Viral Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, United States.World Health Organization, Regional Office for Africa, Immunization, Vaccines and Emergencies (IVE) Cluster, Brazzaville, Congo.

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29544688

Citation

Sanneh, Bakary, et al. "Impact of Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine Against Severe Rotavirus Diarrhoea in the Gambia." Vaccine, vol. 36, no. 47, 2018, pp. 7179-7184.
Sanneh B, Papa Sey A, Shah M, et al. Impact of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe rotavirus diarrhoea in The Gambia. Vaccine. 2018;36(47):7179-7184.
Sanneh, B., Papa Sey, A., Shah, M., Tate, J., Sonko, M., Jagne, S., Jarju, M., Sowe, D., Taal, M., Cohen, A., Parashar, U., & Mwenda, J. M. (2018). Impact of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe rotavirus diarrhoea in The Gambia. Vaccine, 36(47), 7179-7184. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2018.02.091
Sanneh B, et al. Impact of Pentavalent Rotavirus Vaccine Against Severe Rotavirus Diarrhoea in the Gambia. Vaccine. 2018 11 12;36(47):7179-7184. PubMed PMID: 29544688.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine against severe rotavirus diarrhoea in The Gambia. AU - Sanneh,Bakary, AU - Papa Sey,Alhagie, AU - Shah,Minesh, AU - Tate,Jacqueline, AU - Sonko,Mariama, AU - Jagne,Sheriffo, AU - Jarju,ModouLamin, AU - Sowe,Dawda, AU - Taal,Makie, AU - Cohen,Adam, AU - Parashar,Umesh, AU - Mwenda,Jason M, Y1 - 2018/03/12/ PY - 2017/06/08/received PY - 2018/02/05/revised PY - 2018/02/22/accepted PY - 2018/3/17/pubmed PY - 2019/2/15/medline PY - 2018/3/17/entrez KW - Hospitalization KW - Rotavirus KW - Severe diarrhoea KW - Vaccine impact SP - 7179 EP - 7184 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 36 IS - 47 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus vaccines protect against the leading cause of severe childhood diarrhoea, and have been introduced in many low-income African countries. The Gambia introducedRotateq® (RV5) into their national immunization program in 2013. We revieweddata from an active rotavirus sentinel surveillancesitefor early evidence of vaccine impact. METHODS: We compared rotavirus prevalence in diarrhoeal stool in children< 5 years of age admittedat the Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital sentinel surveillance site before (2013) andafterRV5 introduction (2015-2016) in the Gambia. The rotavirus-percent positive was separately compared for all diarrhoealhospitalizations and for hospitalizations with severe symptoms. Rotavirus prevalence was compared annually for the pre-vaccine year of 2013 with post-vaccine years of 2015 and 2016 using chi-square or Fisher's exact tests and the p-value to establish significant relationship was set at p < 0.05. All analyses were completed in SAS 9.3 (SAS Analytics, North Carolina). RESULTS: Rotavirus prevalence among all diarrhoeahospitalizations decreased from 22% in 2013 to 11% in 2015 (p = 0.04), while remaining unchanged in 2016 (18%, p = 0.56). For hospitalizations that were clinically severe and/or treated with intravenous fluids (mean of 46 per year), the rotavirus prevalence decreased from 33% in 2013 to 8% in 2015 (p = 0.04), and to 15% in 2016 (p = 0.08). The children with age <1 year accounted for 45% the population infected with rotavirus in both pre and post rotavirus vaccination periods. CONCLUSIONS: Rotavirus vaccine introduction in the Gambia could be among factors resulting in decreased diarrhea hospitalizations among children at the Edward Francis Small Teaching Hospital, particularly those with severe disease. These results support the continuation of rotavirus vaccine and additional monitoring of rotavirus hospitalization trends in the country. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29544688/Impact_of_pentavalent_rotavirus_vaccine_against_severe_rotavirus_diarrhoea_in_The_Gambia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(18)30290-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -