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Severe desquamation in Kawasaki disease: Is it somehow protective?
Sudan J Paediatr. 2017; 17(2):56-59.SJ

Abstract

Kawasaki disease is a common vasculitis that typically affects children between one and five years of age. We report a 12-year-old boy who presented following a presumed diagnosis of pharyngitis associated with nondesquamating skin rash and conjunctivitis. Despite treatment with amoxicillin for seven days his fever persisted for ten days and then remitted. Two weeks later, he developed full thickness extensive desquamation of his palms and soles that mandated a visit to emergency department in our tertiary health centre. Physical examination revealed full thickness desquamation of his palms and soles with absence of erythema or swelling and he had unremarkable systemic examination. Laboratory tests showed thrombocytosis and high erythrocytes sedimentation rate. Throat culture and Anti-streptolysin-O titer were negative. Aspirin, anti-platelets dose, was initiated. Echocardiography was performed in the first visit and repeated three times later: at four weeks, six weeks and at three months of the illness revealing normal coronary arteries. Follow up complete blood count and sedimentation rate were normal after six weeks, therefore, aspirin was discontinued. Full thickness desquamation, not as it would be expected, might be somehow protective against the involvement of coronary arteries in Kawasaki disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

King Abdullah Specialized Children's Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs & King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.King Abdullah Specialized Children's Hospital, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard Health Affairs & King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29545666

Citation

Alqanatish, Jubran Theeb, and Amir Babiker. "Severe Desquamation in Kawasaki Disease: Is It Somehow Protective?" Sudanese Journal of Paediatrics, vol. 17, no. 2, 2017, pp. 56-59.
Alqanatish JT, Babiker A. Severe desquamation in Kawasaki disease: Is it somehow protective? Sudan J Paediatr. 2017;17(2):56-59.
Alqanatish, J. T., & Babiker, A. (2017). Severe desquamation in Kawasaki disease: Is it somehow protective? Sudanese Journal of Paediatrics, 17(2), 56-59. https://doi.org/10.24911/SJP.2017.2.7
Alqanatish JT, Babiker A. Severe Desquamation in Kawasaki Disease: Is It Somehow Protective. Sudan J Paediatr. 2017;17(2):56-59. PubMed PMID: 29545666.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe desquamation in Kawasaki disease: Is it somehow protective? AU - Alqanatish,Jubran Theeb, AU - Babiker,Amir, PY - 2018/3/17/entrez PY - 2017/1/1/pubmed PY - 2017/1/1/medline KW - Coronary KW - Desquamation KW - Kawasaki KW - Peeling KW - Saudi Arabia. SP - 56 EP - 59 JF - Sudanese journal of paediatrics JO - Sudan J Paediatr VL - 17 IS - 2 N2 - Kawasaki disease is a common vasculitis that typically affects children between one and five years of age. We report a 12-year-old boy who presented following a presumed diagnosis of pharyngitis associated with nondesquamating skin rash and conjunctivitis. Despite treatment with amoxicillin for seven days his fever persisted for ten days and then remitted. Two weeks later, he developed full thickness extensive desquamation of his palms and soles that mandated a visit to emergency department in our tertiary health centre. Physical examination revealed full thickness desquamation of his palms and soles with absence of erythema or swelling and he had unremarkable systemic examination. Laboratory tests showed thrombocytosis and high erythrocytes sedimentation rate. Throat culture and Anti-streptolysin-O titer were negative. Aspirin, anti-platelets dose, was initiated. Echocardiography was performed in the first visit and repeated three times later: at four weeks, six weeks and at three months of the illness revealing normal coronary arteries. Follow up complete blood count and sedimentation rate were normal after six weeks, therefore, aspirin was discontinued. Full thickness desquamation, not as it would be expected, might be somehow protective against the involvement of coronary arteries in Kawasaki disease. SN - 0256-4408 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29545666/Severe_desquamation_in_Kawasaki_disease:_Is_it_somehow_protective L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/29545666/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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