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Dietary intake of cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc in a Northern Italy community.
J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2018 Dec; 50:508-517.JT

Abstract

This study provides the dietary intakes of six trace elements (cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc), generally characterized by both nutritional and toxicological features depending on their exposure. Being diet the most relevant source of exposure to trace elements in non-professionally exposed subjects, we measured content of these trace elements in foods composing the typical Italian diet using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and assessing dietary habits using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire we eventually estimated dietary daily intake of trace elements in a Northern Italian community. In the 890 analyzed food samples, the main contributors to cadmium intake are cereals, vegetables and sweets, while cereals, beverages and vegetable are to primary source of manganese. The primary contributors for copper are cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables, while for chromium are beverages, cereals and meat. The main source of selenium intake are cereals and meat, followed by fish, seafood and milk and dairy products, while of zinc intake are meat, cereals, milk and dairy products. In our Italian population sample, the estimated median (interquartile range) dietary daily intakes are 5.00 (3.17-7.65), 56.70 (36.08-86.70) and 66.53 (40.04-101.32) μg/day for cadmium, chromium and selenium, and corresponding figures are 0.98 (0.61-1.49), 2.34 (1.46-3.52) and 8.50 (5.21-12.48) mg/day for copper, manganese and zinc. The estimated intakes are generally within the average intake reported in other European populations, and in such cases well above the daily dietary intakes recommended by national international agencies, avoiding the risk of excess or deficiency. The present estimated intake data can be used to examine a specific trace element of interest and would afford enhanced health protection from those trace elements characterized by both nutritional and toxicological effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy.CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy.CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy.CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy.CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy.Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, Italy.CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy.CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy.IREN, Reggio Emilia and Piacenza, Italy.CREAGEN, Environmental, Genetic and Nutritional Epidemiology Research Center, Section of Public Health - Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, 287 Via Campi, 41125 Modena, Italy; Department of Epidemiology, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: marco.vinceti@unimore.it.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29548610

Citation

Filippini, Tommaso, et al. "Dietary Intake of Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Manganese, Selenium and Zinc in a Northern Italy Community." Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), vol. 50, 2018, pp. 508-517.
Filippini T, Cilloni S, Malavolti M, et al. Dietary intake of cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc in a Northern Italy community. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2018;50:508-517.
Filippini, T., Cilloni, S., Malavolti, M., Violi, F., Malagoli, C., Tesauro, M., Bottecchi, I., Ferrari, A., Vescovi, L., & Vinceti, M. (2018). Dietary intake of cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc in a Northern Italy community. Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology : Organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS), 50, 508-517. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtemb.2018.03.001
Filippini T, et al. Dietary Intake of Cadmium, Chromium, Copper, Manganese, Selenium and Zinc in a Northern Italy Community. J Trace Elem Med Biol. 2018;50:508-517. PubMed PMID: 29548610.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary intake of cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc in a Northern Italy community. AU - Filippini,Tommaso, AU - Cilloni,Silvia, AU - Malavolti,Marcella, AU - Violi,Federica, AU - Malagoli,Carlotta, AU - Tesauro,Marina, AU - Bottecchi,Ilaria, AU - Ferrari,Angela, AU - Vescovi,Luciano, AU - Vinceti,Marco, Y1 - 2018/03/08/ PY - 2018/01/15/received PY - 2018/02/26/revised PY - 2018/03/02/accepted PY - 2018/3/20/pubmed PY - 2019/1/3/medline PY - 2018/3/18/entrez KW - Cadmium KW - Chromium KW - Copper KW - Dietary intake KW - Food analysis KW - Manganese KW - Nutritional epidemiology KW - Selenium KW - Trace elements KW - Zinc SP - 508 EP - 517 JF - Journal of trace elements in medicine and biology : organ of the Society for Minerals and Trace Elements (GMS) JO - J Trace Elem Med Biol VL - 50 N2 - This study provides the dietary intakes of six trace elements (cadmium, chromium, copper, manganese, selenium and zinc), generally characterized by both nutritional and toxicological features depending on their exposure. Being diet the most relevant source of exposure to trace elements in non-professionally exposed subjects, we measured content of these trace elements in foods composing the typical Italian diet using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and assessing dietary habits using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire we eventually estimated dietary daily intake of trace elements in a Northern Italian community. In the 890 analyzed food samples, the main contributors to cadmium intake are cereals, vegetables and sweets, while cereals, beverages and vegetable are to primary source of manganese. The primary contributors for copper are cereals, fresh fruits and vegetables, while for chromium are beverages, cereals and meat. The main source of selenium intake are cereals and meat, followed by fish, seafood and milk and dairy products, while of zinc intake are meat, cereals, milk and dairy products. In our Italian population sample, the estimated median (interquartile range) dietary daily intakes are 5.00 (3.17-7.65), 56.70 (36.08-86.70) and 66.53 (40.04-101.32) μg/day for cadmium, chromium and selenium, and corresponding figures are 0.98 (0.61-1.49), 2.34 (1.46-3.52) and 8.50 (5.21-12.48) mg/day for copper, manganese and zinc. The estimated intakes are generally within the average intake reported in other European populations, and in such cases well above the daily dietary intakes recommended by national international agencies, avoiding the risk of excess or deficiency. The present estimated intake data can be used to examine a specific trace element of interest and would afford enhanced health protection from those trace elements characterized by both nutritional and toxicological effects. SN - 1878-3252 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29548610/Dietary_intake_of_cadmium_chromium_copper_manganese_selenium_and_zinc_in_a_Northern_Italy_community_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0946-672X(18)30041-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -