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Where do U.S. households purchase healthy foods? An analysis of food-at-home purchases across different types of retailers in a nationally representative dataset.
Prev Med. 2018 07; 112:15-22.PM

Abstract

Food shopping decisions are pathways between food environment, diet and health outcomes, including chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. The choices of where to shop and what to buy are interrelated, though a better understanding of this dynamic is needed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's nationally representative Food Acquisitions and Purchase Survey food-at-home dataset was joined with other databases of retailer characteristics and Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI) of purchases. We used linear regression models with general estimating equations to assess relationships between trip, store, and shopper characteristics with trip HEI scores. We examined HEI component scores for conventional supermarkets and discount/limited assortment retailers with descriptive statistics. Overall, 4962 shoppers made 11,472 shopping trips over one-week periods, 2012-2013. Trips to conventional supermarkets were the most common (53.6%), followed by supercenters (18.6%). Compared to conventional supermarkets, purchases at natural/gourmet stores had significantly higher HEI scores (β = 6.48, 95% CI = [4.45, 8.51], while those from "other" retailers (including corner and convenience stores) were significantly lower (-3.89, [-5.87, -1.92]). Older participants (versus younger) and women (versus men) made significantly healthier purchases (1.19, [0.29, 2.10]). Shoppers with less than some college education made significantly less-healthy purchases, versus shoppers with more education, as did households participating in SNAP, versus those with incomes above 185% of the Federal Poverty Level. Individual, trip, and store characteristics influenced the healthfulness of foods purchased. Interventions to encourage healthy purchasing should reflect these dynamics in terms of how, where, and for whom they are implemented.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stanford Prevention Research Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University, USA. Electronic address: chrisinger@stanford.edu.Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, USA.Department of City & Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania, USA.Department of City & Regional Planning, School of Design, University of Pennsylvania, USA; School of Social Policy and Practice, University of Pennsylvania, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29555187

Citation

Chrisinger, Benjamin W., et al. "Where Do U.S. Households Purchase Healthy Foods? an Analysis of Food-at-home Purchases Across Different Types of Retailers in a Nationally Representative Dataset." Preventive Medicine, vol. 112, 2018, pp. 15-22.
Chrisinger BW, Kallan MJ, Whiteman ED, et al. Where do U.S. households purchase healthy foods? An analysis of food-at-home purchases across different types of retailers in a nationally representative dataset. Prev Med. 2018;112:15-22.
Chrisinger, B. W., Kallan, M. J., Whiteman, E. D., & Hillier, A. (2018). Where do U.S. households purchase healthy foods? An analysis of food-at-home purchases across different types of retailers in a nationally representative dataset. Preventive Medicine, 112, 15-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.03.015
Chrisinger BW, et al. Where Do U.S. Households Purchase Healthy Foods? an Analysis of Food-at-home Purchases Across Different Types of Retailers in a Nationally Representative Dataset. Prev Med. 2018;112:15-22. PubMed PMID: 29555187.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Where do U.S. households purchase healthy foods? An analysis of food-at-home purchases across different types of retailers in a nationally representative dataset. AU - Chrisinger,Benjamin W, AU - Kallan,Michael J, AU - Whiteman,Eliza D, AU - Hillier,Amy, Y1 - 2018/03/16/ PY - 2017/11/03/received PY - 2018/02/16/revised PY - 2018/03/14/accepted PY - 2018/3/21/pubmed PY - 2019/5/29/medline PY - 2018/3/21/entrez KW - Diet KW - Food access KW - Food choice KW - Food environment KW - Food shopping KW - FoodAPS KW - Nutrition KW - SNAP KW - Store choice SP - 15 EP - 22 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 112 N2 - Food shopping decisions are pathways between food environment, diet and health outcomes, including chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. The choices of where to shop and what to buy are interrelated, though a better understanding of this dynamic is needed. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's nationally representative Food Acquisitions and Purchase Survey food-at-home dataset was joined with other databases of retailer characteristics and Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI) of purchases. We used linear regression models with general estimating equations to assess relationships between trip, store, and shopper characteristics with trip HEI scores. We examined HEI component scores for conventional supermarkets and discount/limited assortment retailers with descriptive statistics. Overall, 4962 shoppers made 11,472 shopping trips over one-week periods, 2012-2013. Trips to conventional supermarkets were the most common (53.6%), followed by supercenters (18.6%). Compared to conventional supermarkets, purchases at natural/gourmet stores had significantly higher HEI scores (β = 6.48, 95% CI = [4.45, 8.51], while those from "other" retailers (including corner and convenience stores) were significantly lower (-3.89, [-5.87, -1.92]). Older participants (versus younger) and women (versus men) made significantly healthier purchases (1.19, [0.29, 2.10]). Shoppers with less than some college education made significantly less-healthy purchases, versus shoppers with more education, as did households participating in SNAP, versus those with incomes above 185% of the Federal Poverty Level. Individual, trip, and store characteristics influenced the healthfulness of foods purchased. Interventions to encourage healthy purchasing should reflect these dynamics in terms of how, where, and for whom they are implemented. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29555187/Where_do_U_S__households_purchase_healthy_foods_An_analysis_of_food_at_home_purchases_across_different_types_of_retailers_in_a_nationally_representative_dataset_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(18)30104-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -