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Neural correlates of binocular depth inversion illusion in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Binocular depth inversion illusion (BDII), a visual, 'top-down'-driven information process, is impaired in schizophrenia and particularly in its early stages. BDII is a sensitive measure of impaired visual information processing and represents a valid diagnostic tool for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, neurobiological underpinnings of aberrant BDII in first-episode schizophrenia are largely unknown at present.

METHODS

In this study, 22 right-handed, first-episode, antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients underwent BDII assessment and MRI scanning at 1.5 T. The surface-based analysis via new version of Freesurfer (6.0) enabled calculation of cortical thickness and surface area. BDII total and faces scores were related to the two distinct cortical measurements.

RESULTS

We found a significant correlation between BDII performance and cortical thickness in the inferior frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus (p < 0.003, Bonferroni corr.), as well as superior parietal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and precentral gyrus (p < 0.05, CWP corr.), respectively. BDII performance was significantly correlated with surface area in the superior parietal gyrus and right postcentral gyrus (p < 0.003, Bonferroni corr.).

CONCLUSION

BDII performance may be linked to cortical thickness and surface area variations in regions involved in "adaptive" or "top-down" modulation and stimulus processing, i.e., frontal and parietal lobes. Our results suggest that cortical features of distinct evolutionary and genetic origin differently contribute to BDII performance in first-episode, antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159, Mannheim, Germany. Institute of Radiochemistry and Experimental Molecular Imaging, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159, Mannheim, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159, Mannheim, Germany.

    ,

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159, Mannheim, Germany. Brain and Mind Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia.

    Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Central Institute of Mental Health, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, 68159, Mannheim, Germany. dusan.hirjak@zi-mannheim.de.

    Source

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    29556734

    Citation

    Rohleder, Cathrin, et al. "Neural Correlates of Binocular Depth Inversion Illusion in Antipsychotic-naïve First-episode Schizophrenia Patients." European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, 2018.
    Rohleder C, Koethe D, Fritze S, et al. Neural correlates of binocular depth inversion illusion in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2018.
    Rohleder, C., Koethe, D., Fritze, S., Topor, C. E., Leweke, F. M., & Hirjak, D. (2018). Neural correlates of binocular depth inversion illusion in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. European Archives of Psychiatry and Clinical Neuroscience, doi:10.1007/s00406-018-0886-2.
    Rohleder C, et al. Neural Correlates of Binocular Depth Inversion Illusion in Antipsychotic-naïve First-episode Schizophrenia Patients. Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2018 Mar 19; PubMed PMID: 29556734.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Neural correlates of binocular depth inversion illusion in antipsychotic-naïve first-episode schizophrenia patients. AU - Rohleder,Cathrin, AU - Koethe,Dagmar, AU - Fritze,Stefan, AU - Topor,Cristina E, AU - Leweke,F Markus, AU - Hirjak,Dusan, Y1 - 2018/03/19/ PY - 2017/08/27/received PY - 2018/03/13/accepted PY - 2018/3/21/entrez PY - 2018/3/21/pubmed PY - 2018/3/21/medline KW - Cortex KW - Depth inversion illusion (DII) KW - FreeSurfer KW - MRI KW - Perception KW - Schizophrenia JF - European archives of psychiatry and clinical neuroscience JO - Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci N2 - OBJECTIVES: Binocular depth inversion illusion (BDII), a visual, 'top-down'-driven information process, is impaired in schizophrenia and particularly in its early stages. BDII is a sensitive measure of impaired visual information processing and represents a valid diagnostic tool for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. However, neurobiological underpinnings of aberrant BDII in first-episode schizophrenia are largely unknown at present. METHODS: In this study, 22 right-handed, first-episode, antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients underwent BDII assessment and MRI scanning at 1.5 T. The surface-based analysis via new version of Freesurfer (6.0) enabled calculation of cortical thickness and surface area. BDII total and faces scores were related to the two distinct cortical measurements. RESULTS: We found a significant correlation between BDII performance and cortical thickness in the inferior frontal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus (p < 0.003, Bonferroni corr.), as well as superior parietal gyrus, postcentral gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and precentral gyrus (p < 0.05, CWP corr.), respectively. BDII performance was significantly correlated with surface area in the superior parietal gyrus and right postcentral gyrus (p < 0.003, Bonferroni corr.). CONCLUSION: BDII performance may be linked to cortical thickness and surface area variations in regions involved in "adaptive" or "top-down" modulation and stimulus processing, i.e., frontal and parietal lobes. Our results suggest that cortical features of distinct evolutionary and genetic origin differently contribute to BDII performance in first-episode, antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients. SN - 1433-8491 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29556734/Neural_correlates_of_binocular_depth_inversion_illusion_in_antipsychotic_naïve_first_episode_schizophrenia_patients_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00406-018-0886-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -