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Identifying a consensus sample type to test for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papillomavirus.
Clin Microbiol Infect 2018; 24(12):1328-1332CM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a global cause of acute illness. Early detection plays a crucial role in interrupting transmission and preventing complications. However, the accessibility of STI testing is curbed by the lack of an overall preferred sample type. By means of a prospective study in female sex workers (FSW), we compared the sensitivity of samples from different anatomical sites in detecting Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma genitalium and human papillomavirus. Besides, we documented the prevalence of each STI in this high-risk population.

METHODS

We selected 303 FSW and tested them for each STI by nucleic acid amplification testing on two vaginal and cervical swabs from different manufacturers, cervical smear and first-void urine. The sensitivity of each sample type was compared for each infectious agent in order to identify a consensus sample type.

RESULTS

Vaginal swabs were superior to all other sample types, with an overall sensitivity of 86%. The sensitivity was the lowest for first-void urine, detecting only 63% of positive cases. The prevalence was 3.3% (10/299) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae; 9.0% (27/299) for Chlamydia trachomatis; 7.4% (22/298) for Trichomonas vaginalis; 10.8% (32/296) for Mycoplasma genitalium and 55.6% (158/284) for human papillomavirus.

CONCLUSIONS

When testing for STIs, vaginal swabs are the sample of choice and first-void urine should be avoided. Designating (self-sampled) vaginal swabs as a consensus sample type enables harmonization of STI testing and extension of testing to large numbers of unscreened females.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Department of Clinical Chemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Ghent University, Belgium. Electronic address: liselotte.coorevits@ugent.be.Pasop VZW, Ghent, Belgium.Pasop VZW, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Pathology, Ghent University and Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Pathology, Ghent University and Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Department of Clinical Chemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Ghent University, Belgium.Department of Laboratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Department of Clinical Chemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Ghent University, Belgium; School of Life Sciences, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29559392

Citation

Coorevits, L, et al. "Identifying a Consensus Sample Type to Test for Chlamydia Trachomatis, Neisseria Gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma Genitalium, Trichomonas Vaginalis and Human Papillomavirus." Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, vol. 24, no. 12, 2018, pp. 1328-1332.
Coorevits L, Traen A, Bingé L, et al. Identifying a consensus sample type to test for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papillomavirus. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2018;24(12):1328-1332.
Coorevits, L., Traen, A., Bingé, L., Van Dorpe, J., Praet, M., Boelens, J., & Padalko, E. (2018). Identifying a consensus sample type to test for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papillomavirus. Clinical Microbiology and Infection : the Official Publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, 24(12), pp. 1328-1332. doi:10.1016/j.cmi.2018.03.013.
Coorevits L, et al. Identifying a Consensus Sample Type to Test for Chlamydia Trachomatis, Neisseria Gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma Genitalium, Trichomonas Vaginalis and Human Papillomavirus. Clin Microbiol Infect. 2018;24(12):1328-1332. PubMed PMID: 29559392.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Identifying a consensus sample type to test for Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papillomavirus. AU - Coorevits,L, AU - Traen,A, AU - Bingé,L, AU - Van Dorpe,J, AU - Praet,M, AU - Boelens,J, AU - Padalko,E, Y1 - 2018/03/17/ PY - 2017/10/28/received PY - 2018/03/05/revised PY - 2018/03/08/accepted PY - 2018/3/22/pubmed PY - 2019/1/31/medline PY - 2018/3/22/entrez KW - Chlamydia trachomatis KW - Genital samples KW - Human papillomavirus KW - Laboratory diagnosis KW - Mycoplasma genitalium KW - Neisseria gonorrhoeae KW - Sexually transmitted infections KW - Trichomonas vaginalis SP - 1328 EP - 1332 JF - Clinical microbiology and infection : the official publication of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases JO - Clin. Microbiol. Infect. VL - 24 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are a global cause of acute illness. Early detection plays a crucial role in interrupting transmission and preventing complications. However, the accessibility of STI testing is curbed by the lack of an overall preferred sample type. By means of a prospective study in female sex workers (FSW), we compared the sensitivity of samples from different anatomical sites in detecting Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, Trichomonas vaginalis, Mycoplasma genitalium and human papillomavirus. Besides, we documented the prevalence of each STI in this high-risk population. METHODS: We selected 303 FSW and tested them for each STI by nucleic acid amplification testing on two vaginal and cervical swabs from different manufacturers, cervical smear and first-void urine. The sensitivity of each sample type was compared for each infectious agent in order to identify a consensus sample type. RESULTS: Vaginal swabs were superior to all other sample types, with an overall sensitivity of 86%. The sensitivity was the lowest for first-void urine, detecting only 63% of positive cases. The prevalence was 3.3% (10/299) for Neisseria gonorrhoeae; 9.0% (27/299) for Chlamydia trachomatis; 7.4% (22/298) for Trichomonas vaginalis; 10.8% (32/296) for Mycoplasma genitalium and 55.6% (158/284) for human papillomavirus. CONCLUSIONS: When testing for STIs, vaginal swabs are the sample of choice and first-void urine should be avoided. Designating (self-sampled) vaginal swabs as a consensus sample type enables harmonization of STI testing and extension of testing to large numbers of unscreened females. SN - 1469-0691 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29559392/Identifying_a_consensus_sample_type_to_test_for_Chlamydia_trachomatis_Neisseria_gonorrhoeae_Mycoplasma_genitalium_Trichomonas_vaginalis_and_human_papillomavirus_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1198-743X(18)30223-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -