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Longitudinal relations among maternal depressive symptoms, maternal mind-mindedness, and infant attachment behavior.
Infant Behav Dev. 2018 05; 51:33-44.IB

Abstract

The relations among maternal depression risk, maternal mind-mindedness, and infants' attachment behavior were longitudinally examined in a community sample of mother-infant dyads. Maternal self-reported depression risk was measured at the infant ages of 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months. Maternal mind-mindedness, assessed from mothers' comments about infants' mental states (e.g., infants' thoughts, desires, or emotions), was measured during mother-infant interactions when infants were 4 months. Infants' attachment behavior was assessed at one year. Mothers' depression risk decreased over the infants' first year, with the sharpest decline between 6 weeks and 4 months. Mothers at risk for depression when infants were 6 weeks showed less appropriate mind-mindedness at 4 months. Mind-mindedness was not related to maternal depression risk at the infant age of 4 months or 12 months. Infants' degree of disorganized attachment behavior at one year was positively associated with maternal depression risk at 6 weeks and negatively associated with maternal appropriate mind-mindedness at 4 months. Mothers who are at risk for depression in their infants' early lives may be hampered in their capacity to respond appropriately to their infants' mental states. Infants with mothers who have difficulty responding appropriately to their mental states, as suggested by low appropriate mind-mindedness, may feel less known and recognized by their mothers, a key theme in the origins of disorganized attachment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, St. Francis Xavier University, Canada. Electronic address: abigelow@stfx.ca.New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, USA.Department of Psychology, St. Francis Xavier University, Canada.New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, USA.New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, USA.New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, USA.New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29567547

Citation

Bigelow, Ann E., et al. "Longitudinal Relations Among Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Maternal Mind-mindedness, and Infant Attachment Behavior." Infant Behavior & Development, vol. 51, 2018, pp. 33-44.
Bigelow AE, Beebe B, Power M, et al. Longitudinal relations among maternal depressive symptoms, maternal mind-mindedness, and infant attachment behavior. Infant Behav Dev. 2018;51:33-44.
Bigelow, A. E., Beebe, B., Power, M., Stafford, A. L., Ewing, J., Egleson, A., & Kaminer, T. (2018). Longitudinal relations among maternal depressive symptoms, maternal mind-mindedness, and infant attachment behavior. Infant Behavior & Development, 51, 33-44. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.infbeh.2018.02.006
Bigelow AE, et al. Longitudinal Relations Among Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Maternal Mind-mindedness, and Infant Attachment Behavior. Infant Behav Dev. 2018;51:33-44. PubMed PMID: 29567547.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal relations among maternal depressive symptoms, maternal mind-mindedness, and infant attachment behavior. AU - Bigelow,Ann E, AU - Beebe,Beatrice, AU - Power,Michelle, AU - Stafford,Anna-Lee, AU - Ewing,Julie, AU - Egleson,Anna, AU - Kaminer,Tammy, Y1 - 2018/03/19/ PY - 2017/11/10/received PY - 2018/02/16/revised PY - 2018/02/18/accepted PY - 2018/3/24/pubmed PY - 2019/1/1/medline PY - 2018/3/24/entrez KW - Infant attachment KW - Maternal depressive symptoms KW - Mind-mindedness SP - 33 EP - 44 JF - Infant behavior & development JO - Infant Behav Dev VL - 51 N2 - The relations among maternal depression risk, maternal mind-mindedness, and infants' attachment behavior were longitudinally examined in a community sample of mother-infant dyads. Maternal self-reported depression risk was measured at the infant ages of 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months. Maternal mind-mindedness, assessed from mothers' comments about infants' mental states (e.g., infants' thoughts, desires, or emotions), was measured during mother-infant interactions when infants were 4 months. Infants' attachment behavior was assessed at one year. Mothers' depression risk decreased over the infants' first year, with the sharpest decline between 6 weeks and 4 months. Mothers at risk for depression when infants were 6 weeks showed less appropriate mind-mindedness at 4 months. Mind-mindedness was not related to maternal depression risk at the infant age of 4 months or 12 months. Infants' degree of disorganized attachment behavior at one year was positively associated with maternal depression risk at 6 weeks and negatively associated with maternal appropriate mind-mindedness at 4 months. Mothers who are at risk for depression in their infants' early lives may be hampered in their capacity to respond appropriately to their infants' mental states. Infants with mothers who have difficulty responding appropriately to their mental states, as suggested by low appropriate mind-mindedness, may feel less known and recognized by their mothers, a key theme in the origins of disorganized attachment. SN - 1934-8800 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29567547/Longitudinal_relations_among_maternal_depressive_symptoms_maternal_mind_mindedness_and_infant_attachment_behavior_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0163-6383(17)30250-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -