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Vascular plant-mediated controls on atmospheric carbon assimilation and peat carbon decomposition under climate change.
Glob Chang Biol 2018; 24(9):3911-3921GC

Abstract

Climate change can alter peatland plant community composition by promoting the growth of vascular plants. How such vegetation change affects peatland carbon dynamics remains, however, unclear. In order to assess the effect of vegetation change on carbon uptake and release, we performed a vascular plant-removal experiment in two Sphagnum-dominated peatlands that represent contrasting stages of natural vegetation succession along a climatic gradient. Periodic measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange revealed that vascular plants play a crucial role in assuring the potential for net carbon uptake, particularly with a warmer climate. The presence of vascular plants, however, also increased ecosystem respiration, and by using the seasonal variation of respired CO2 radiocarbon (bomb-14 C) signature we demonstrate an enhanced heterotrophic decomposition of peat carbon due to rhizosphere priming. The observed rhizosphere priming of peat carbon decomposition was matched by more advanced humification of dissolved organic matter, which remained apparent beyond the plant growing season. Our results underline the relevance of rhizosphere priming in peatlands, especially when assessing the future carbon sink function of peatlands undergoing a shift in vegetation community composition in association with climate change.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL Site Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Laboratory of Ecological Systems ECOS, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland. Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Climate Impacts Research Centre, Umeå University, Abisko, Sweden.Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL Site Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Laboratory of Ecological Systems ECOS, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland.Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL Site Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Laboratory of Ecological Systems ECOS, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland. Laboratoire de Chrono-Environnement, UMR CNRS 6249, UFR des Sciences et Techniques, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France.Department of Ecology and Environmental Science, Climate Impacts Research Centre, Umeå University, Abisko, Sweden.NERC Radiocarbon Facility (East Kilbride), East Kilbride, UK.ISTO, UMR 7327, Université d'Orléans, Orléans, France. ISTO, UMR 7327, CNRS, Orléans, France. ISTO, UMR 7327, BRGM, Orléans, France.Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL Site Birmensdorf, Birmensdorf, Switzerland.Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL Site Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Laboratory of Ecological Systems ECOS, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland. Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK.Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL Site Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Laboratory of Ecological Systems ECOS, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland. Biological Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK.Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, WSL Site Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. Laboratory of Ecological Systems ECOS, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering ENAC, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland. Department of Life Science and Biotechnologies, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29569798

Citation

Gavazov, Konstantin, et al. "Vascular Plant-mediated Controls On Atmospheric Carbon Assimilation and Peat Carbon Decomposition Under Climate Change." Global Change Biology, vol. 24, no. 9, 2018, pp. 3911-3921.
Gavazov K, Albrecht R, Buttler A, et al. Vascular plant-mediated controls on atmospheric carbon assimilation and peat carbon decomposition under climate change. Glob Chang Biol. 2018;24(9):3911-3921.
Gavazov, K., Albrecht, R., Buttler, A., Dorrepaal, E., Garnett, M. H., Gogo, S., ... Bragazza, L. (2018). Vascular plant-mediated controls on atmospheric carbon assimilation and peat carbon decomposition under climate change. Global Change Biology, 24(9), pp. 3911-3921. doi:10.1111/gcb.14140.
Gavazov K, et al. Vascular Plant-mediated Controls On Atmospheric Carbon Assimilation and Peat Carbon Decomposition Under Climate Change. Glob Chang Biol. 2018;24(9):3911-3921. PubMed PMID: 29569798.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vascular plant-mediated controls on atmospheric carbon assimilation and peat carbon decomposition under climate change. AU - Gavazov,Konstantin, AU - Albrecht,Remy, AU - Buttler,Alexandre, AU - Dorrepaal,Ellen, AU - Garnett,Mark H, AU - Gogo,Sebastien, AU - Hagedorn,Frank, AU - Mills,Robert T E, AU - Robroek,Bjorn J M, AU - Bragazza,Luca, Y1 - 2018/04/17/ PY - 2017/10/19/received PY - 2018/03/06/accepted PY - 2018/3/24/pubmed PY - 2019/9/3/medline PY - 2018/3/24/entrez KW - climate warming KW - decomposition KW - ecosystem respiration KW - elevation gradient KW - net ecosystem CO2 exchange KW - peatlands KW - rhizosphere priming KW - vascular plant biomass SP - 3911 EP - 3921 JF - Global change biology JO - Glob Chang Biol VL - 24 IS - 9 N2 - Climate change can alter peatland plant community composition by promoting the growth of vascular plants. How such vegetation change affects peatland carbon dynamics remains, however, unclear. In order to assess the effect of vegetation change on carbon uptake and release, we performed a vascular plant-removal experiment in two Sphagnum-dominated peatlands that represent contrasting stages of natural vegetation succession along a climatic gradient. Periodic measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange revealed that vascular plants play a crucial role in assuring the potential for net carbon uptake, particularly with a warmer climate. The presence of vascular plants, however, also increased ecosystem respiration, and by using the seasonal variation of respired CO2 radiocarbon (bomb-14 C) signature we demonstrate an enhanced heterotrophic decomposition of peat carbon due to rhizosphere priming. The observed rhizosphere priming of peat carbon decomposition was matched by more advanced humification of dissolved organic matter, which remained apparent beyond the plant growing season. Our results underline the relevance of rhizosphere priming in peatlands, especially when assessing the future carbon sink function of peatlands undergoing a shift in vegetation community composition in association with climate change. SN - 1365-2486 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29569798/Vascular_plant_mediated_controls_on_atmospheric_carbon_assimilation_and_peat_carbon_decomposition_under_climate_change_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14140 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -