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Is Cannabis Use Associated With Increased Risk of Cigarette Smoking Initiation, Persistence, and Relapse? Longitudinal Data From a Representative Sample of US Adults.
J Clin Psychiatry. 2018 Mar/Apr; 79(2)JC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The current study prospectively investigated the relationship between cannabis use and cigarette smoking initiation, persistence, and relapse during a 3-year period among adults in the United States.

METHODS

Analyses included respondents who completed Waves 1 (2001-2002) and 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and responded to questions about cannabis use and smoking status (n = 34,639). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds of cigarette use at Wave 2 among Wave 1 daily smokers, nondaily smokers, former smokers, and nonsmokers by Wave 1 cannabis use.

RESULTS

In unadjusted analyses, Wave 1 cannabis use was associated with increased odds of Wave 2 daily and nondaily smoking for Wave 1 nonsmokers (daily OR = 2.90; 95% CI, 2.10-4.00; nondaily OR = 4.45; 95% CI, 3.97-5.00) and Wave 2 relapse to daily and nondaily smoking for Wave 1 former smokers (daily OR = 4.18, 95% CI, 3.01-5.81; nondaily OR = 5.24; 95% CI, 3.74-7.34). Wave 1 cannabis use was associated with decreased odds of Wave 2 smoking cessation for Wave 1 daily cigarette smokers (OR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.51-0.64). The associations remained significant for daily smoking initiation (OR = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.06-1.93), daily smoking relapse (OR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.00-2.16), and smoking cessation (OR = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.69-0.87) after adjusting for demographics and psychiatric disorders. Associations remained significant for nondaily smoking initiation (OR = 1.85; 95% CI, 1.59-2.16) and nondaily smoking relapse (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.54) after adjusting for these covariates as well as for alcohol and substance use disorders.

CONCLUSIONS

Cannabis use was associated with increased initiation of, persistence of, and relapse to cigarette smoking. Additional attention to cannabis use in tobacco control efforts and in clinical settings aimed at reducing cigarette smoking and smoking-related negative consequences may be warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York, USA. Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales Medicine, Sydney, Australia.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, 55 West 125th Street, Rm 611, New York, NY 10027. renee.goodwin@sph.cuny.edu. Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA. Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy, The City University of New York, New York, New York, USA. Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health, The City University of New York, New York, New York, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29570966

Citation

Weinberger, Andrea H., et al. "Is Cannabis Use Associated With Increased Risk of Cigarette Smoking Initiation, Persistence, and Relapse? Longitudinal Data From a Representative Sample of US Adults." The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, vol. 79, no. 2, 2018.
Weinberger AH, Platt J, Copeland J, et al. Is Cannabis Use Associated With Increased Risk of Cigarette Smoking Initiation, Persistence, and Relapse? Longitudinal Data From a Representative Sample of US Adults. J Clin Psychiatry. 2018;79(2).
Weinberger, A. H., Platt, J., Copeland, J., & Goodwin, R. D. (2018). Is Cannabis Use Associated With Increased Risk of Cigarette Smoking Initiation, Persistence, and Relapse? Longitudinal Data From a Representative Sample of US Adults. The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 79(2). https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.17m11522
Weinberger AH, et al. Is Cannabis Use Associated With Increased Risk of Cigarette Smoking Initiation, Persistence, and Relapse? Longitudinal Data From a Representative Sample of US Adults. J Clin Psychiatry. 2018 Mar/Apr;79(2) PubMed PMID: 29570966.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Is Cannabis Use Associated With Increased Risk of Cigarette Smoking Initiation, Persistence, and Relapse? Longitudinal Data From a Representative Sample of US Adults. AU - Weinberger,Andrea H, AU - Platt,Jonathan, AU - Copeland,Jan, AU - Goodwin,Renee D, PY - 2017/01/25/received PY - 2017/08/14/accepted PY - 2018/3/24/pubmed PY - 2019/6/27/medline PY - 2018/3/24/entrez JF - The Journal of clinical psychiatry JO - J Clin Psychiatry VL - 79 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The current study prospectively investigated the relationship between cannabis use and cigarette smoking initiation, persistence, and relapse during a 3-year period among adults in the United States. METHODS: Analyses included respondents who completed Waves 1 (2001-2002) and 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions and responded to questions about cannabis use and smoking status (n = 34,639). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds of cigarette use at Wave 2 among Wave 1 daily smokers, nondaily smokers, former smokers, and nonsmokers by Wave 1 cannabis use. RESULTS: In unadjusted analyses, Wave 1 cannabis use was associated with increased odds of Wave 2 daily and nondaily smoking for Wave 1 nonsmokers (daily OR = 2.90; 95% CI, 2.10-4.00; nondaily OR = 4.45; 95% CI, 3.97-5.00) and Wave 2 relapse to daily and nondaily smoking for Wave 1 former smokers (daily OR = 4.18, 95% CI, 3.01-5.81; nondaily OR = 5.24; 95% CI, 3.74-7.34). Wave 1 cannabis use was associated with decreased odds of Wave 2 smoking cessation for Wave 1 daily cigarette smokers (OR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.51-0.64). The associations remained significant for daily smoking initiation (OR = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.06-1.93), daily smoking relapse (OR = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.00-2.16), and smoking cessation (OR = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.69-0.87) after adjusting for demographics and psychiatric disorders. Associations remained significant for nondaily smoking initiation (OR = 1.85; 95% CI, 1.59-2.16) and nondaily smoking relapse (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.05-2.54) after adjusting for these covariates as well as for alcohol and substance use disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis use was associated with increased initiation of, persistence of, and relapse to cigarette smoking. Additional attention to cannabis use in tobacco control efforts and in clinical settings aimed at reducing cigarette smoking and smoking-related negative consequences may be warranted. SN - 1555-2101 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29570966/Is_Cannabis_Use_Associated_With_Increased_Risk_of_Cigarette_Smoking_Initiation_Persistence_and_Relapse_Longitudinal_Data_From_a_Representative_Sample_of_US_Adults_ L2 - http://www.psychiatrist.com/JCP/article/Pages/2018/v79n02/17m11522.aspx DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -