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Reducing meat consumption in the USA: a nationally representative survey of attitudes and behaviours.
Public Health Nutr 2018; 21(10):1835-1844PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Excess meat consumption, particularly of red and processed meats, is associated with nutritional and environmental health harms. While only a small portion of the population is vegetarian, surveys suggest many Americans may be reducing their meat consumption. To inform education campaigns, more information is needed about attitudes, perceptions, behaviours and foods eaten in meatless meals.

DESIGN

A web-based survey administered in April 2015 assessed meat reduction behaviours, attitudes, what respondents ate in meatless meals and sociodemographic characteristics.

SETTING

Nationally representative, web-based survey in the USA.

SUBJECTS

US adults (n 1112) selected from GfK Knowledgeworks' 50 000-member online panel. Survey weights were used to assure representativeness.

RESULTS

Two-thirds reported reducing meat consumption in at least one category over three years, with reductions of red and processed meat most frequent. The most common reasons for reduction were cost and health; environment and animal welfare lagged. Non-meat reducers commonly agreed with statements suggesting that meat was healthy and 'belonged' in the diet. Vegetables were most often consumed 'always' in meatless meals, but cheese/dairy was also common. Reported meat reduction was most common among those aged 45-59 years and among those with lower incomes.

CONCLUSIONS

The public and environmental health benefits of reducing meat consumption create a need for campaigns to raise awareness and contribute to motivation for change. These findings provide rich information to guide intervention development, both for the USA and other high-income countries that consume meat in high quantities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Environmental Health & Engineering,Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,615 N. Wolfe Street,Baltimore,MD 21205,USA.2Department of Health Policy & Management,Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,Baltimore,MD,USA.3Center for a Livable Future,Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,Baltimore,MD,USA.3Center for a Livable Future,Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health,Baltimore,MD,USA.5School of Culinary Science & Nutrition,The Culinary Institute of America,Hyde Park,NY,USA.6Department of Health Management and Policy,University of Michigan School of Public Health,Ann Arbor,MI,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29576031

Citation

Neff, Roni A., et al. "Reducing Meat Consumption in the USA: a Nationally Representative Survey of Attitudes and Behaviours." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 21, no. 10, 2018, pp. 1835-1844.
Neff RA, Edwards D, Palmer A, et al. Reducing meat consumption in the USA: a nationally representative survey of attitudes and behaviours. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(10):1835-1844.
Neff, R. A., Edwards, D., Palmer, A., Ramsing, R., Righter, A., & Wolfson, J. (2018). Reducing meat consumption in the USA: a nationally representative survey of attitudes and behaviours. Public Health Nutrition, 21(10), pp. 1835-1844. doi:10.1017/S1368980017004190.
Neff RA, et al. Reducing Meat Consumption in the USA: a Nationally Representative Survey of Attitudes and Behaviours. Public Health Nutr. 2018;21(10):1835-1844. PubMed PMID: 29576031.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reducing meat consumption in the USA: a nationally representative survey of attitudes and behaviours. AU - Neff,Roni A, AU - Edwards,Danielle, AU - Palmer,Anne, AU - Ramsing,Rebecca, AU - Righter,Allison, AU - Wolfson,Julia, Y1 - 2018/03/26/ PY - 2018/3/27/pubmed PY - 2019/9/24/medline PY - 2018/3/27/entrez KW - Dietary attitudes KW - Dietary behaviours KW - Meat consumption KW - Meat reduction SP - 1835 EP - 1844 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 21 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Excess meat consumption, particularly of red and processed meats, is associated with nutritional and environmental health harms. While only a small portion of the population is vegetarian, surveys suggest many Americans may be reducing their meat consumption. To inform education campaigns, more information is needed about attitudes, perceptions, behaviours and foods eaten in meatless meals. DESIGN: A web-based survey administered in April 2015 assessed meat reduction behaviours, attitudes, what respondents ate in meatless meals and sociodemographic characteristics. SETTING: Nationally representative, web-based survey in the USA. SUBJECTS: US adults (n 1112) selected from GfK Knowledgeworks' 50 000-member online panel. Survey weights were used to assure representativeness. RESULTS: Two-thirds reported reducing meat consumption in at least one category over three years, with reductions of red and processed meat most frequent. The most common reasons for reduction were cost and health; environment and animal welfare lagged. Non-meat reducers commonly agreed with statements suggesting that meat was healthy and 'belonged' in the diet. Vegetables were most often consumed 'always' in meatless meals, but cheese/dairy was also common. Reported meat reduction was most common among those aged 45-59 years and among those with lower incomes. CONCLUSIONS: The public and environmental health benefits of reducing meat consumption create a need for campaigns to raise awareness and contribute to motivation for change. These findings provide rich information to guide intervention development, both for the USA and other high-income countries that consume meat in high quantities. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29576031/Reducing_meat_consumption_in_the_USA:_a_nationally_representative_survey_of_attitudes_and_behaviours_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980017004190/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -