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A case with corneal perforation due to bacterial concretion derived from lacrimal canaliculitis.
Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep. 2018 Mar; 9:116-118.AJ

Abstract

Purpose

To report a case with corneal perforation, presumably due to ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP) and bacterial concretion derived from lacrimal canaliculitis.

Observations

A patient with OCP demonstrated adherence of concretion to the cornea of her right eye. She also demonstrated canaliculitis in this eye. We removed a whitish precipitate from the bottom of the corneal ulcer. When we flushed her lacrimal pathway, a marked amount of bacterial concretion and dense mucosa were refluxed from both puncta on the right side. On the next day, corneal perforation was visible from the area where concretion was removed. We performed punctoplasty and removed the bacterial concretion from the lacrimal canaliculus and sac. After the operation, her symptoms improved and corneal perforation recovered.

Conclusions and Importance

Both lacrimal canaliculitis and OCP can cause corneal perforation, and adherence of bacterial concretion onto the cornea is very rare. However, once it occurs, corneal perforation can rapidly follow. OCP sometimes causes corneal epithelial damage, which may influence adherence to concretion. Canaliculitis in patients with OCP should be managed carefully.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.Department of Ophthalmology, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29577102

Citation

Ishikawa, Sho, and Naoko Kato. "A Case With Corneal Perforation Due to Bacterial Concretion Derived From Lacrimal Canaliculitis." American Journal of Ophthalmology Case Reports, vol. 9, 2018, pp. 116-118.
Ishikawa S, Kato N. A case with corneal perforation due to bacterial concretion derived from lacrimal canaliculitis. Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep. 2018;9:116-118.
Ishikawa, S., & Kato, N. (2018). A case with corneal perforation due to bacterial concretion derived from lacrimal canaliculitis. American Journal of Ophthalmology Case Reports, 9, 116-118. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajoc.2018.01.004
Ishikawa S, Kato N. A Case With Corneal Perforation Due to Bacterial Concretion Derived From Lacrimal Canaliculitis. Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep. 2018;9:116-118. PubMed PMID: 29577102.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A case with corneal perforation due to bacterial concretion derived from lacrimal canaliculitis. AU - Ishikawa,Sho, AU - Kato,Naoko, Y1 - 2018/01/12/ PY - 2017/06/29/received PY - 2017/12/20/revised PY - 2018/01/02/accepted PY - 2018/3/27/entrez PY - 2018/3/27/pubmed PY - 2018/3/27/medline KW - Bacterial concretion KW - Corneal perforation KW - Lacrimal canaliculitis KW - Ocular cicatricial pemphigoid SP - 116 EP - 118 JF - American journal of ophthalmology case reports JO - Am J Ophthalmol Case Rep VL - 9 N2 - Purpose: To report a case with corneal perforation, presumably due to ocular cicatricial pemphigoid (OCP) and bacterial concretion derived from lacrimal canaliculitis. Observations: A patient with OCP demonstrated adherence of concretion to the cornea of her right eye. She also demonstrated canaliculitis in this eye. We removed a whitish precipitate from the bottom of the corneal ulcer. When we flushed her lacrimal pathway, a marked amount of bacterial concretion and dense mucosa were refluxed from both puncta on the right side. On the next day, corneal perforation was visible from the area where concretion was removed. We performed punctoplasty and removed the bacterial concretion from the lacrimal canaliculus and sac. After the operation, her symptoms improved and corneal perforation recovered. Conclusions and Importance: Both lacrimal canaliculitis and OCP can cause corneal perforation, and adherence of bacterial concretion onto the cornea is very rare. However, once it occurs, corneal perforation can rapidly follow. OCP sometimes causes corneal epithelial damage, which may influence adherence to concretion. Canaliculitis in patients with OCP should be managed carefully. SN - 2451-9936 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29577102/A_case_with_corneal_perforation_due_to_bacterial_concretion_derived_from_lacrimal_canaliculitis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2451-9936(17)30211-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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