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Disparities exist between the dietary intake of Indigenous Australian women during pregnancy and the Australian dietary guidelines: the Gomeroi gaaynggal study.
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2018 08; 31(4):473-485.JH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little is known about the adequacy of nutrient intakes and the overall diet quality of Indigenous Australian pregnant women. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess nutrient sufficiency and diet quality, as measured using the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS), in pregnant women from the Gomeroi gaaynggal cohort (n = 58).

METHODS

Maternal dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed using the Australian Eating Survey Food Frequency Questionnaire, which was self-administered in the third trimester. Diet quality was determined using the ARFS. Food group servings and nutrient intakes were compared to the Australian Guide to Health Eating (AGHE) and Australian Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs). The current analysis examined the adequacy of usual intakes from food sources only, excluding supplements.

RESULTS

None of the women met all AGHE daily food group serving recommendations. The highest alignment rates were for dairy (33%), meat/alternatives (31%) and vegetables (29.3%). Almost 93% of participants exceeded the recommended intake of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and percentage energy from saturated fat was high (15%). Of the five key nutrients for optimal reproductive health (folate, iron, calcium, zinc and fibre), the nutrients with the highest percentage of pregnant women achieving the NRVs were zinc (77.6%) and folate (68.9%), whereas iron was the lowest. Only one person achieved all NRVs (folate, iron, calcium, zinc and fibre) important in pregnancy. The median ARFS was 28 points (maximum of 73).

CONCLUSIONS

Although the small cohort limits the generalisability of the findings of the present study, the data obtained indicate that the diets of these Indigenous pregnant women are inadequate. Therefore, strategies aiming to optimise nutrient intakes of Indigenous pregnant women are needed urgently.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Priority Research Centre for Reproductive Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Gomeroi gaaynggal Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia. School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Department of Rural Health, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia.Gomeroi gaaynggal Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia.Gomeroi gaaynggal Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia.Gomeroi gaaynggal Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia.Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, Australia.Priority Research Centre for Reproductive Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Gomeroi gaaynggal Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia. School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Department of Rural Health, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia. Priority Research Centre for Generational Health and Ageing, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.Priority Research Centre for Reproductive Sciences, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia. Gomeroi gaaynggal Centre, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Tamworth, NSW, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29578261

Citation

Lee, Y Q., et al. "Disparities Exist Between the Dietary Intake of Indigenous Australian Women During Pregnancy and the Australian Dietary Guidelines: the Gomeroi Gaaynggal Study." Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics : the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association, vol. 31, no. 4, 2018, pp. 473-485.
Lee YQ, Collins CE, Schumacher TL, et al. Disparities exist between the dietary intake of Indigenous Australian women during pregnancy and the Australian dietary guidelines: the Gomeroi gaaynggal study. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2018;31(4):473-485.
Lee, Y. Q., Collins, C. E., Schumacher, T. L., Weatherall, L. J., Keogh, L., Sutherland, K., Gordon, A., Rae, K. M., & Pringle, K. G. (2018). Disparities exist between the dietary intake of Indigenous Australian women during pregnancy and the Australian dietary guidelines: the Gomeroi gaaynggal study. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics : the Official Journal of the British Dietetic Association, 31(4), 473-485. https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12550
Lee YQ, et al. Disparities Exist Between the Dietary Intake of Indigenous Australian Women During Pregnancy and the Australian Dietary Guidelines: the Gomeroi Gaaynggal Study. J Hum Nutr Diet. 2018;31(4):473-485. PubMed PMID: 29578261.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disparities exist between the dietary intake of Indigenous Australian women during pregnancy and the Australian dietary guidelines: the Gomeroi gaaynggal study. AU - Lee,Y Q, AU - Collins,C E, AU - Schumacher,T L, AU - Weatherall,L J, AU - Keogh,L, AU - Sutherland,K, AU - Gordon,A, AU - Rae,K M, AU - Pringle,K G, Y1 - 2018/03/26/ PY - 2018/3/27/pubmed PY - 2019/10/29/medline PY - 2018/3/27/entrez KW - Indigenous KW - diet quality KW - maternal nutrition KW - pregnancy diet SP - 473 EP - 485 JF - Journal of human nutrition and dietetics : the official journal of the British Dietetic Association JO - J Hum Nutr Diet VL - 31 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little is known about the adequacy of nutrient intakes and the overall diet quality of Indigenous Australian pregnant women. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess nutrient sufficiency and diet quality, as measured using the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS), in pregnant women from the Gomeroi gaaynggal cohort (n = 58). METHODS: Maternal dietary intake during pregnancy was assessed using the Australian Eating Survey Food Frequency Questionnaire, which was self-administered in the third trimester. Diet quality was determined using the ARFS. Food group servings and nutrient intakes were compared to the Australian Guide to Health Eating (AGHE) and Australian Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs). The current analysis examined the adequacy of usual intakes from food sources only, excluding supplements. RESULTS: None of the women met all AGHE daily food group serving recommendations. The highest alignment rates were for dairy (33%), meat/alternatives (31%) and vegetables (29.3%). Almost 93% of participants exceeded the recommended intake of energy-dense, nutrient-poor foods and percentage energy from saturated fat was high (15%). Of the five key nutrients for optimal reproductive health (folate, iron, calcium, zinc and fibre), the nutrients with the highest percentage of pregnant women achieving the NRVs were zinc (77.6%) and folate (68.9%), whereas iron was the lowest. Only one person achieved all NRVs (folate, iron, calcium, zinc and fibre) important in pregnancy. The median ARFS was 28 points (maximum of 73). CONCLUSIONS: Although the small cohort limits the generalisability of the findings of the present study, the data obtained indicate that the diets of these Indigenous pregnant women are inadequate. Therefore, strategies aiming to optimise nutrient intakes of Indigenous pregnant women are needed urgently. SN - 1365-277X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29578261/Disparities_exist_between_the_dietary_intake_of_Indigenous_Australian_women_during_pregnancy_and_the_Australian_dietary_guidelines:_the_Gomeroi_gaaynggal_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12550 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -