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Non-herbal tea consumption and ovarian cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational epidemiologic studies with indirect comparison and dose-response analysis.
Carcinogenesis 2018; 39(6):808-818C

Abstract

Ovarian cancer (OC) accounts for 4% of female malignancies worldwide, and its prognosis is unfavorable. Currently available epidemiologic data suggest that non-herbal tea consumption may reduce OC risk, but these evidences are inconsistent. A comprehensive literature search for observational epidemiologic studies reporting associations between non-herbal tea consumption and OC risk was conducted in electronic databases. A random-effects model was used to synthesize effect measures in binary meta-analysis, and adjusted indirect comparison was used to compare whether there was a difference in effects between green tea (GT) and black tea (BT). Both linear and non-linear models were used to explore the dose-response relationship. Fourteen studies were included, and we obtained an inverse and significant pooled estimate in binary meta-analysis [risk ratio (RR)pool = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.95, PCochran < 0.001, I2 = 81.5%]. No publication bias was identified in binary meta-analysis. In binary meta-analysis stratified by tea types, we observed a significant association for GT (RRpool = 0.64, 95% CI 0.45-0.90, PCochran = 0.071, I2 = 53.6%), but not BT (RRpool = 0.85, 95% CI 0.65-1.12, PCochran = 0.007, I2 = 65.9%). Indirect comparison, which treated BT as the reference, showed an inverse but non-significant association (RRGT versus BT = 0.74, 95% CI 0.48-1.15). Both linear and non-linear models found that OC risk decreased as the consumption levels of total non-herbal tea increased. However, the dose-response relationship was stronger for GT when compared with BT. Our results suggest that non-herbal tea, especially GT, is associated with a reduced risk of OC. Future studies should explore biochemical evidence regarding the variation in chemopreventive effects between different types of non-herbal tea.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, CB, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Department of Epidemiology, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health, Chicago, IL, USA.Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, CB, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Gillings School of Global Public Health, CB, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.Department of Epidemiology, Brown University School of Public Health, Providence, RI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29579174

Citation

Zhang, Dongyu, et al. "Non-herbal Tea Consumption and Ovarian Cancer Risk: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Epidemiologic Studies With Indirect Comparison and Dose-response Analysis." Carcinogenesis, vol. 39, no. 6, 2018, pp. 808-818.
Zhang D, Kaushiva A, Xi Y, et al. Non-herbal tea consumption and ovarian cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational epidemiologic studies with indirect comparison and dose-response analysis. Carcinogenesis. 2018;39(6):808-818.
Zhang, D., Kaushiva, A., Xi, Y., Wang, T., & Li, N. (2018). Non-herbal tea consumption and ovarian cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational epidemiologic studies with indirect comparison and dose-response analysis. Carcinogenesis, 39(6), pp. 808-818. doi:10.1093/carcin/bgy048.
Zhang D, et al. Non-herbal Tea Consumption and Ovarian Cancer Risk: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Epidemiologic Studies With Indirect Comparison and Dose-response Analysis. Carcinogenesis. 2018 05 28;39(6):808-818. PubMed PMID: 29579174.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Non-herbal tea consumption and ovarian cancer risk: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational epidemiologic studies with indirect comparison and dose-response analysis. AU - Zhang,Dongyu, AU - Kaushiva,Alpana, AU - Xi,Yuzhi, AU - Wang,Tengteng, AU - Li,Nan, PY - 2017/09/22/received PY - 2018/03/17/accepted PY - 2018/3/27/pubmed PY - 2019/1/29/medline PY - 2018/3/27/entrez SP - 808 EP - 818 JF - Carcinogenesis JO - Carcinogenesis VL - 39 IS - 6 N2 - Ovarian cancer (OC) accounts for 4% of female malignancies worldwide, and its prognosis is unfavorable. Currently available epidemiologic data suggest that non-herbal tea consumption may reduce OC risk, but these evidences are inconsistent. A comprehensive literature search for observational epidemiologic studies reporting associations between non-herbal tea consumption and OC risk was conducted in electronic databases. A random-effects model was used to synthesize effect measures in binary meta-analysis, and adjusted indirect comparison was used to compare whether there was a difference in effects between green tea (GT) and black tea (BT). Both linear and non-linear models were used to explore the dose-response relationship. Fourteen studies were included, and we obtained an inverse and significant pooled estimate in binary meta-analysis [risk ratio (RR)pool = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.61-0.95, PCochran < 0.001, I2 = 81.5%]. No publication bias was identified in binary meta-analysis. In binary meta-analysis stratified by tea types, we observed a significant association for GT (RRpool = 0.64, 95% CI 0.45-0.90, PCochran = 0.071, I2 = 53.6%), but not BT (RRpool = 0.85, 95% CI 0.65-1.12, PCochran = 0.007, I2 = 65.9%). Indirect comparison, which treated BT as the reference, showed an inverse but non-significant association (RRGT versus BT = 0.74, 95% CI 0.48-1.15). Both linear and non-linear models found that OC risk decreased as the consumption levels of total non-herbal tea increased. However, the dose-response relationship was stronger for GT when compared with BT. Our results suggest that non-herbal tea, especially GT, is associated with a reduced risk of OC. Future studies should explore biochemical evidence regarding the variation in chemopreventive effects between different types of non-herbal tea. SN - 1460-2180 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29579174/Non_herbal_tea_consumption_and_ovarian_cancer_risk:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_observational_epidemiologic_studies_with_indirect_comparison_and_dose_response_analysis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/carcin/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/carcin/bgy048 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -