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Assessment of thyroid function in children, adults and pregnant and lactating women after long-term salt iodisation measurements.
Br J Nutr. 2018 06; 119(11):1245-1253.BJ

Abstract

Universal salt iodisation (USI) has been successfully implemented in China for more than 15 years. Recent evidence suggests that the definition of 'adequate iodine' (100-199 µg/l) be revised to 'sufficient iodine' (100-299 µg/l) based on the median urinary iodine concentration (MUI) in school-age children. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in populations after long-term salt iodisation and examine whether the definition of adequate iodine can be broadened to sufficient iodine based on the thyroid function in four population groups. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in six provinces in the northern, central and southern regions of China. Four population groups consisting of 657 children, 755 adults, 347 pregnant women and 348 lactating women were recruited. Three spot urinary samples were collected over a 10-d period and blood samples were collected on the 1st day. In the study, among the adults, pregnant women and lactating women, the prevalence rates of elevated thyroglobulin antibody and thyroid microsomal antibody levels were 12·4, 8·5 and 7·8 %, and 12·1, 9·1 and 9·1 %, respectively. Abnormally high thyroid dysfunction prevalence was not observed after more than 15 years of USI in China because the thyroid dysfunction rates were all <5 %. The recommended range should be cautiously broadened from adequate iodine to sufficient iodine according to the MUI of school-age children considering the high levels of hormones and antibodies in the other populations. Adults, particularly pregnant women positive for thyroid antibodies, should be closely monitored.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology,Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & Ministry of Health,Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention,Harbin Medical University,No. 157Baojian Road,Nangang District,Harbin 150081,People's Republic of China.2Sydney School of Public Health,China Studies Centre,The University of Sydney,Sydney 2006,Australia.1Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology,Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & Ministry of Health,Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention,Harbin Medical University,No. 157Baojian Road,Nangang District,Harbin 150081,People's Republic of China.1Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology,Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & Ministry of Health,Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention,Harbin Medical University,No. 157Baojian Road,Nangang District,Harbin 150081,People's Republic of China.2Sydney School of Public Health,China Studies Centre,The University of Sydney,Sydney 2006,Australia.3Center for Disease Control of Gansu Province,No. 93Duanjiatan Road,Lanzhou 730020,People's Republic of China.4Center for Disease Control of Fujian Province,No. 76 Jintai Road,Fuzhou 350001,People's Republic of China.5Institute for Endemic Disease Control of Shandong Province,No. 11 Yandongxin Road,Lixia District,Jinan 250014,People's Republic of China.6Center for Disease Control of Anhui Province,Hefei Economic and Technological Development Zone (12560 Prosperous Avenue),Hefei 230061,People's Republic of China.7The Second Institute for Endemic Disease Control of Jilin Province,No. 23 Chongqing Road,Jilin 132001,People's Republic of China.8Center for Disease Control of Chongqing Municipality,No. 8 Changjiang II Road,Yuzhong District,Chongqing 400042,People's Republic of China.9Public Health School,Qiqihar Medical University,No. 333 Bukuibei Road,Jianhua District,Qiqihar 161006,People's Republic of China.1Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology,Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & Ministry of Health,Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention,Harbin Medical University,No. 157Baojian Road,Nangang District,Harbin 150081,People's Republic of China.1Key Lab of Etiology and Epidemiology,Education Bureau of Heilongjiang Province & Ministry of Health,Center for Endemic Disease Control, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention,Harbin Medical University,No. 157Baojian Road,Nangang District,Harbin 150081,People's Republic of China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29580306

Citation

Su, Xiaohui, et al. "Assessment of Thyroid Function in Children, Adults and Pregnant and Lactating Women After Long-term Salt Iodisation Measurements." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 119, no. 11, 2018, pp. 1245-1253.
Su X, Li M, Liu L, et al. Assessment of thyroid function in children, adults and pregnant and lactating women after long-term salt iodisation measurements. Br J Nutr. 2018;119(11):1245-1253.
Su, X., Li, M., Liu, L., Shen, H., Kelly, P. J., Wang, Y., Chen, Z., Wang, J., Li, W., Chen, H., Xiao, B., Han, Y., Liu, S., & Liu, P. (2018). Assessment of thyroid function in children, adults and pregnant and lactating women after long-term salt iodisation measurements. The British Journal of Nutrition, 119(11), 1245-1253. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114518000570
Su X, et al. Assessment of Thyroid Function in Children, Adults and Pregnant and Lactating Women After Long-term Salt Iodisation Measurements. Br J Nutr. 2018;119(11):1245-1253. PubMed PMID: 29580306.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Assessment of thyroid function in children, adults and pregnant and lactating women after long-term salt iodisation measurements. AU - Su,Xiaohui, AU - Li,Mu, AU - Liu,Lixiang, AU - Shen,Hongmei, AU - Kelly,Patrick J, AU - Wang,Yanling, AU - Chen,Zhihui, AU - Wang,Jinbiao, AU - Li,Weidong, AU - Chen,Huixin, AU - Xiao,Bangzhong, AU - Han,Yunfeng, AU - Liu,Shoujun, AU - Liu,Peng, Y1 - 2018/03/27/ PY - 2018/3/28/pubmed PY - 2019/4/4/medline PY - 2018/3/28/entrez KW - FT3 free triiodothyronine KW - FT4 free thyroxine KW - MUI median urinary iodine concentration KW - TMAb thyroid microsomal antibody KW - TPOAb thyroid peroxidase antibody KW - TSH thyroid-stimulating hormone KW - TT3 total triiodothyronine KW - TT4 total thyroxine KW - Tg thyroglobulin KW - TgAb thyroglobulin antibody KW - USI universal salt iodisation KW - Adults KW - Children KW - Lactating women KW - Pregnant women KW - Urinary iodine SP - 1245 EP - 1253 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 119 IS - 11 N2 - Universal salt iodisation (USI) has been successfully implemented in China for more than 15 years. Recent evidence suggests that the definition of 'adequate iodine' (100-199 µg/l) be revised to 'sufficient iodine' (100-299 µg/l) based on the median urinary iodine concentration (MUI) in school-age children. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in populations after long-term salt iodisation and examine whether the definition of adequate iodine can be broadened to sufficient iodine based on the thyroid function in four population groups. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in six provinces in the northern, central and southern regions of China. Four population groups consisting of 657 children, 755 adults, 347 pregnant women and 348 lactating women were recruited. Three spot urinary samples were collected over a 10-d period and blood samples were collected on the 1st day. In the study, among the adults, pregnant women and lactating women, the prevalence rates of elevated thyroglobulin antibody and thyroid microsomal antibody levels were 12·4, 8·5 and 7·8 %, and 12·1, 9·1 and 9·1 %, respectively. Abnormally high thyroid dysfunction prevalence was not observed after more than 15 years of USI in China because the thyroid dysfunction rates were all <5 %. The recommended range should be cautiously broadened from adequate iodine to sufficient iodine according to the MUI of school-age children considering the high levels of hormones and antibodies in the other populations. Adults, particularly pregnant women positive for thyroid antibodies, should be closely monitored. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29580306/Assessment_of_thyroid_function_in_children_adults_and_pregnant_and_lactating_women_after_long_term_salt_iodisation_measurements_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114518000570/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -