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Lymphocytic focus score is positively related to airway and interstitial lung diseases in primary Sjögren's syndrome.
Respir Med. 2018 04; 137:95-102.RM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Although high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is useful for the characterization of minute morphological changes in the lungs, no study has investigated risk factors for lung involvement detected by HRCT in patients with Sjögren's syndrome with or without respiratory symptoms. The aim of the current study was to investigate risk factors for lung involvement in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome detected by HRCT, with a particular focus on airway and interstitial lung diseases.

METHODS

We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and investigated risk factors for lung involvement detected by HRCT. A total of 101 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome with initial HRCT examinations were enrolled.

RESULTS

Higher age, dry mouth, and higher labial gland biopsy focus scores (≥4) were risk factors for airway diseases (odds ratio [OR] 1.064 confidence interval [CI] 1.026-1.102, OR 8.795 CI 2.317-33.378 and OR 3.261 CI 1.100-9.675, respectively) in the multivariable analysis. Higher age, male sex, and higher labial gland biopsy focus scores (≥4) were risk factors for interstitial lung diseases (OR 1.078 CI 1.032-1.127, OR 12.178 CI 1.121-132.307 and OR 3.954 CI 1.423-10.987, respectively) in the multivariable analysis. The presence of anti-T-lymphotropic virus type 1 antibodies was significantly more common in patients with airway diseases.

CONCLUSIONS

This study showed significant associations of labial gland biopsy focus scores and dry mouth with pulmonary manifestations in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Focus scores as well as dry mouth may reflect lymphoproliferative activity in the lungs in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Translational Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan. Electronic address: kakugawa@nagasaki-u.ac.jp.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Translational Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Translational Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Unit of Advanced Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Advanced Preventive Medical Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Unit of Advanced Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Advanced Preventive Medical Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan; The First Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Clinical Research Center, Nagasaki University Hospital, Nagasaki, Japan; Division of Biostatistics, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Translational Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Translational Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of General Medicine, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Translational Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Rheumatology, Tobata General Hospital, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, Unit of Advanced Preventive Medical Sciences, Division of Advanced Preventive Medical Sciences, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.The First Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu, Japan.Department of Respiratory Medicine, Unit of Translational Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29605220

Citation

Kakugawa, Tomoyuki, et al. "Lymphocytic Focus Score Is Positively Related to Airway and Interstitial Lung Diseases in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome." Respiratory Medicine, vol. 137, 2018, pp. 95-102.
Kakugawa T, Sakamoto N, Ishimoto H, et al. Lymphocytic focus score is positively related to airway and interstitial lung diseases in primary Sjögren's syndrome. Respir Med. 2018;137:95-102.
Kakugawa, T., Sakamoto, N., Ishimoto, H., Shimizu, T., Nakamura, H., Nawata, A., Ito, C., Sato, S., Hanaka, T., Oda, K., Kido, T., Miyamura, T., Nakashima, S., Aoki, T., Nakamichi, S., Obase, Y., Saito, K., Yatera, K., Ishimatsu, Y., ... Mukae, H. (2018). Lymphocytic focus score is positively related to airway and interstitial lung diseases in primary Sjögren's syndrome. Respiratory Medicine, 137, 95-102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2018.02.023
Kakugawa T, et al. Lymphocytic Focus Score Is Positively Related to Airway and Interstitial Lung Diseases in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome. Respir Med. 2018;137:95-102. PubMed PMID: 29605220.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lymphocytic focus score is positively related to airway and interstitial lung diseases in primary Sjögren's syndrome. AU - Kakugawa,Tomoyuki, AU - Sakamoto,Noriho, AU - Ishimoto,Hiroshi, AU - Shimizu,Toshimasa, AU - Nakamura,Hideki, AU - Nawata,Aya, AU - Ito,Chiyo, AU - Sato,Shuntaro, AU - Hanaka,Tetsuya, AU - Oda,Keishi, AU - Kido,Takashi, AU - Miyamura,Takuto, AU - Nakashima,Shota, AU - Aoki,Takatoshi, AU - Nakamichi,Seiko, AU - Obase,Yasushi, AU - Saito,Kazuyoshi, AU - Yatera,Kazuhiro, AU - Ishimatsu,Yuji, AU - Nakayama,Toshiyuki, AU - Korogi,Yukunori, AU - Kawakami,Atsushi, AU - Tanaka,Yoshiya, AU - Mukae,Hiroshi, Y1 - 2018/03/01/ PY - 2017/10/26/received PY - 2018/01/31/revised PY - 2018/02/28/accepted PY - 2018/4/2/entrez PY - 2018/4/2/pubmed PY - 2018/12/12/medline KW - Age KW - Dry mouth KW - Labial gland biopsy KW - Pulmonary KW - Risk factor KW - Sjögren's syndrome SP - 95 EP - 102 JF - Respiratory medicine JO - Respir Med VL - 137 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Although high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is useful for the characterization of minute morphological changes in the lungs, no study has investigated risk factors for lung involvement detected by HRCT in patients with Sjögren's syndrome with or without respiratory symptoms. The aim of the current study was to investigate risk factors for lung involvement in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome detected by HRCT, with a particular focus on airway and interstitial lung diseases. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome and investigated risk factors for lung involvement detected by HRCT. A total of 101 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome with initial HRCT examinations were enrolled. RESULTS: Higher age, dry mouth, and higher labial gland biopsy focus scores (≥4) were risk factors for airway diseases (odds ratio [OR] 1.064 confidence interval [CI] 1.026-1.102, OR 8.795 CI 2.317-33.378 and OR 3.261 CI 1.100-9.675, respectively) in the multivariable analysis. Higher age, male sex, and higher labial gland biopsy focus scores (≥4) were risk factors for interstitial lung diseases (OR 1.078 CI 1.032-1.127, OR 12.178 CI 1.121-132.307 and OR 3.954 CI 1.423-10.987, respectively) in the multivariable analysis. The presence of anti-T-lymphotropic virus type 1 antibodies was significantly more common in patients with airway diseases. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed significant associations of labial gland biopsy focus scores and dry mouth with pulmonary manifestations in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Focus scores as well as dry mouth may reflect lymphoproliferative activity in the lungs in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. SN - 1532-3064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29605220/Lymphocytic_focus_score_is_positively_related_to_airway_and_interstitial_lung_diseases_in_primary_Sjögren's_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0954-6111(18)30062-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -