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Higher dietary carotenoid intake associated with lower risk of hip fracture in middle-aged and elderly Chinese: A matched case-control study.
Bone 2018; 111:116-122BONE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Mechanism studies have suggested that carotenoids may benefit bone health due to their antioxidant properties, but epidemiological data on their effects on risk of hip fracture are sparse.

PURPOSE

To explore the relationships between dietary total and specific carotenoids and the risk of hip fracture in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population.

DESIGN

A case-control study of 1070 patients with hip fractures (diagnosed within 2 weeks) aged 55-80 years and 1070 age- (within 3 years) and gender-matched controls was conducted in Guangdong, China between 2009 and 2015. Information on dietary carotenoid intake was assessed using a 79-item food frequency questionnaire administered in face-to-face interviews, and general information was collected using structured questionnaires. The univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression models were applied to analyze the associations.

MAIN RESULTS

Higher intakes of both total and some specific carotenoids (including β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin and lutein/zeaxanthin) were significantly associated with a lower risk of hip fracture (all p trends <0.01). Compared with the lowest quartile of carotenoids, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidential intervals of the highest quartile were 0.44 (0.29, 0.68) (total carotenoids), 0.50 (0.29, 0.69) (β-carotene), 0.55 (0.38, 0.80) (β-cryptoxanthin) and 0.40 (0.27, 0.59) (lutein/zeaxanthin), respectively. There were no statistically significant associations between α-carotene and lycopene intakes and hip fracture risk after adjustment for various confounding variables.

CONCLUSION

These results suggest that the consumption of carotenoids may be protective against hip fracture in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China; Department of Epidemiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632, China.Guangzhou Orthopaedics Trauma Hospital, Guangzhou 510045, China.Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China.The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510630, China. Electronic address: lyy257@126.com.Department of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Food, Nutrition and Health, School of Public Health, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510080, China. Electronic address: chenyum@mail.sysu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29605302

Citation

Cao, Wen-Ting, et al. "Higher Dietary Carotenoid Intake Associated With Lower Risk of Hip Fracture in Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese: a Matched Case-control Study." Bone, vol. 111, 2018, pp. 116-122.
Cao WT, Zeng FF, Li BL, et al. Higher dietary carotenoid intake associated with lower risk of hip fracture in middle-aged and elderly Chinese: A matched case-control study. Bone. 2018;111:116-122.
Cao, W. T., Zeng, F. F., Li, B. L., Lin, J. S., Liang, Y. Y., & Chen, Y. M. (2018). Higher dietary carotenoid intake associated with lower risk of hip fracture in middle-aged and elderly Chinese: A matched case-control study. Bone, 111, pp. 116-122. doi:10.1016/j.bone.2018.03.023.
Cao WT, et al. Higher Dietary Carotenoid Intake Associated With Lower Risk of Hip Fracture in Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese: a Matched Case-control Study. Bone. 2018;111:116-122. PubMed PMID: 29605302.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Higher dietary carotenoid intake associated with lower risk of hip fracture in middle-aged and elderly Chinese: A matched case-control study. AU - Cao,Wen-Ting, AU - Zeng,Fang-Fang, AU - Li,Bao-Lin, AU - Lin,Jie-Sheng, AU - Liang,Ya-Yong, AU - Chen,Yu-Ming, Y1 - 2018/03/29/ PY - 2017/10/25/received PY - 2018/03/22/revised PY - 2018/03/26/accepted PY - 2018/4/2/pubmed PY - 2019/3/23/medline PY - 2018/4/2/entrez KW - Case-control study KW - Chinese KW - Dietary carotenoids KW - Hip fracture SP - 116 EP - 122 JF - Bone JO - Bone VL - 111 N2 - BACKGROUND: Mechanism studies have suggested that carotenoids may benefit bone health due to their antioxidant properties, but epidemiological data on their effects on risk of hip fracture are sparse. PURPOSE: To explore the relationships between dietary total and specific carotenoids and the risk of hip fracture in a middle-aged and elderly Chinese population. DESIGN: A case-control study of 1070 patients with hip fractures (diagnosed within 2 weeks) aged 55-80 years and 1070 age- (within 3 years) and gender-matched controls was conducted in Guangdong, China between 2009 and 2015. Information on dietary carotenoid intake was assessed using a 79-item food frequency questionnaire administered in face-to-face interviews, and general information was collected using structured questionnaires. The univariate and multivariate conditional logistic regression models were applied to analyze the associations. MAIN RESULTS: Higher intakes of both total and some specific carotenoids (including β-carotene, β-cryptoxanthin and lutein/zeaxanthin) were significantly associated with a lower risk of hip fracture (all p trends <0.01). Compared with the lowest quartile of carotenoids, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidential intervals of the highest quartile were 0.44 (0.29, 0.68) (total carotenoids), 0.50 (0.29, 0.69) (β-carotene), 0.55 (0.38, 0.80) (β-cryptoxanthin) and 0.40 (0.27, 0.59) (lutein/zeaxanthin), respectively. There were no statistically significant associations between α-carotene and lycopene intakes and hip fracture risk after adjustment for various confounding variables. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the consumption of carotenoids may be protective against hip fracture in middle-aged and elderly Chinese adults. SN - 1873-2763 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29605302/Higher_dietary_carotenoid_intake_associated_with_lower_risk_of_hip_fracture_in_middle_aged_and_elderly_Chinese:_A_matched_case_control_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S8756-3282(18)30142-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -