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The effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on cognition and symptoms in outpatients with chronic schizophrenia a randomized placebo controlled trial.
Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2018 07; 235(7):1923-1932.P

Abstract

RATIONALE

Preliminary evidence suggests that cannabidiol (CBD) may be effective in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders; however, CBD has never been evaluated for the treatment of cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia (CIAS).

OBJECTIVE

This study compared the cognitive, symptomatic, and side effects of CBD versus placebo in a clinical trial.

METHODS

This study was a 6-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, fixed-dose study of oral CBD (600 mg/day) or placebo augmentation in 36 stable antipsychotic-treated patients diagnosed with chronic schizophrenia. All subjects completed the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) at baseline and at end of 6 weeks of treatment. Psychotic symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at baseline and biweekly.

RESULTS

There was no main effect of time or drug on MCCB Composite score, but a significant drug × time effect was observed (p = 0.02). Post hoc analyses revealed that only placebo-treated subjects improved over time (p = 0.03). There was a significant decrease in PANSS Total scores over time (p < 0. 0001) but there was no significant drug × time interaction (p = 0.18). Side effects were similar between CBD and placebo, with the one exception being sedation, which was more prevalent in the CBD group.

CONCLUSIONS

At the dose studied, CBD augmentation was not associated with an improvement in MCCB or PANSS scores in stable antipsychotic-treated outpatients with schizophrenia. Overall, CBD was well tolerated with no worsening of mood, suicidality, or movement side effects.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00588731.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA.Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA.Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA.Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA.Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA.Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA.GW Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, UK.Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA.Schizophrenia and Neuropharmacology Research Group at Yale, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA. Mohini.Ranganathan@yale.edu. Department of Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. Mohini.Ranganathan@yale.edu. Abraham Ribicoff Research Facilities, Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, USA. Mohini.Ranganathan@yale.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29619533

Citation

Boggs, Douglas L., et al. "The Effects of Cannabidiol (CBD) On Cognition and Symptoms in Outpatients With Chronic Schizophrenia a Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial." Psychopharmacology, vol. 235, no. 7, 2018, pp. 1923-1932.
Boggs DL, Surti T, Gupta A, et al. The effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on cognition and symptoms in outpatients with chronic schizophrenia a randomized placebo controlled trial. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2018;235(7):1923-1932.
Boggs, D. L., Surti, T., Gupta, A., Gupta, S., Niciu, M., Pittman, B., Schnakenberg Martin, A. M., Thurnauer, H., Davies, A., D'Souza, D. C., & Ranganathan, M. (2018). The effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on cognition and symptoms in outpatients with chronic schizophrenia a randomized placebo controlled trial. Psychopharmacology, 235(7), 1923-1932. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00213-018-4885-9
Boggs DL, et al. The Effects of Cannabidiol (CBD) On Cognition and Symptoms in Outpatients With Chronic Schizophrenia a Randomized Placebo Controlled Trial. Psychopharmacology (Berl). 2018;235(7):1923-1932. PubMed PMID: 29619533.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of cannabidiol (CBD) on cognition and symptoms in outpatients with chronic schizophrenia a randomized placebo controlled trial. AU - Boggs,Douglas L, AU - Surti,Toral, AU - Gupta,Aarti, AU - Gupta,Swapnil, AU - Niciu,Mark, AU - Pittman,Brian, AU - Schnakenberg Martin,Ashley M, AU - Thurnauer,Halle, AU - Davies,Andrew, AU - D'Souza,Deepak C, AU - Ranganathan,Mohini, Y1 - 2018/04/05/ PY - 2018/01/23/received PY - 2018/03/15/accepted PY - 2018/4/6/pubmed PY - 2019/3/14/medline PY - 2018/4/6/entrez KW - Attention KW - CBD KW - Cannabidiol KW - Cannabinoids KW - Cognition KW - Memory KW - Psychosis KW - Schizophrenia SP - 1923 EP - 1932 JF - Psychopharmacology JO - Psychopharmacology (Berl) VL - 235 IS - 7 N2 - RATIONALE: Preliminary evidence suggests that cannabidiol (CBD) may be effective in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders; however, CBD has never been evaluated for the treatment of cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia (CIAS). OBJECTIVE: This study compared the cognitive, symptomatic, and side effects of CBD versus placebo in a clinical trial. METHODS: This study was a 6-week, randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel group, fixed-dose study of oral CBD (600 mg/day) or placebo augmentation in 36 stable antipsychotic-treated patients diagnosed with chronic schizophrenia. All subjects completed the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) at baseline and at end of 6 weeks of treatment. Psychotic symptoms were assessed using the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at baseline and biweekly. RESULTS: There was no main effect of time or drug on MCCB Composite score, but a significant drug × time effect was observed (p = 0.02). Post hoc analyses revealed that only placebo-treated subjects improved over time (p = 0.03). There was a significant decrease in PANSS Total scores over time (p < 0. 0001) but there was no significant drug × time interaction (p = 0.18). Side effects were similar between CBD and placebo, with the one exception being sedation, which was more prevalent in the CBD group. CONCLUSIONS: At the dose studied, CBD augmentation was not associated with an improvement in MCCB or PANSS scores in stable antipsychotic-treated outpatients with schizophrenia. Overall, CBD was well tolerated with no worsening of mood, suicidality, or movement side effects. TRIAL REGISTRATION: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00588731. SN - 1432-2072 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29619533/The_effects_of_cannabidiol__CBD__on_cognition_and_symptoms_in_outpatients_with_chronic_schizophrenia_a_randomized_placebo_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00213-018-4885-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -