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Iron deficiency after bariatric surgery: what is the real problem?
Proc Nutr Soc 2018; 77(4):445-455PN

Abstract

The growing prevalence of obesity explains the rising interest in bariatric surgery. Compared with non-surgical treatment options, bariatric surgery results in greater and sustained improvements in weight loss, obesity associated complications, all-cause mortality and quality of life. These encouraging metabolic and weight effects come with a downside, namely the risk of nutritional deficiencies. Particularly striking is the risk to develop iron deficiency. Postoperatively, the prevalence of iron deficiency varies between 18 and 53 % after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and between 1 and 54 % after sleeve gastrectomy. Therefore, preventive strategies and effective treatment options for iron deficiency are crucial to successfully manage the iron status of patients after bariatric surgery. With this review, we discuss the risks and the contributing factors of developing iron deficiency after bariatric surgery. Furthermore, we highlight the discrepancy in the diagnosis of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia and highlight the evidence supporting the current nutritional recommendations in the field of bariatric research. In conclusion, we advocate for more nutrition-related research in patient populations in order to provide strong evidence-based guidelines after bariatric surgery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology,KU Leuven and Department of Endocrinology,University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven,Campus Gasthuisberg,Leuven,Belgium.Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology,KU Leuven and Department of Endocrinology,University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven,Campus Gasthuisberg,Leuven,Belgium.Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology,KU Leuven and Department of Endocrinology,University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven,Campus Gasthuisberg,Leuven,Belgium.Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology,KU Leuven and Department of Endocrinology,University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven,Campus Gasthuisberg,Leuven,Belgium.Laboratory of Food Technology,KU Leuven,Leuven,Belgium.Department Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences,KU Leuven,Leuven,Belgium.Clinical and Experimental Endocrinology,KU Leuven and Department of Endocrinology,University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven,Campus Gasthuisberg,Leuven,Belgium.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29619914

Citation

Steenackers, Nele, et al. "Iron Deficiency After Bariatric Surgery: what Is the Real Problem?" The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, vol. 77, no. 4, 2018, pp. 445-455.
Steenackers N, Van der Schueren B, Mertens A, et al. Iron deficiency after bariatric surgery: what is the real problem? Proc Nutr Soc. 2018;77(4):445-455.
Steenackers, N., Van der Schueren, B., Mertens, A., Lannoo, M., Grauwet, T., Augustijns, P., & Matthys, C. (2018). Iron deficiency after bariatric surgery: what is the real problem? The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 77(4), pp. 445-455. doi:10.1017/S0029665118000149.
Steenackers N, et al. Iron Deficiency After Bariatric Surgery: what Is the Real Problem. Proc Nutr Soc. 2018;77(4):445-455. PubMed PMID: 29619914.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron deficiency after bariatric surgery: what is the real problem? AU - Steenackers,Nele, AU - Van der Schueren,Bart, AU - Mertens,Ann, AU - Lannoo,Matthias, AU - Grauwet,Tara, AU - Augustijns,Patrick, AU - Matthys,Christophe, Y1 - 2018/04/05/ PY - 2018/4/6/pubmed PY - 2019/2/12/medline PY - 2018/4/6/entrez KW - ASMBS American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery KW - IFSO International Federation for the Surgery of Obesity and Metabolic Disorders KW - RYGB Roux-en-Y gastric bypass KW - SG sleeve gastrectomy KW - TSAT transferrin saturation KW - Bariatric surgery KW - Iron deficiency KW - Roux-en-Y gastric bypass KW - Sleeve gastrectomy SP - 445 EP - 455 JF - The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society JO - Proc Nutr Soc VL - 77 IS - 4 N2 - The growing prevalence of obesity explains the rising interest in bariatric surgery. Compared with non-surgical treatment options, bariatric surgery results in greater and sustained improvements in weight loss, obesity associated complications, all-cause mortality and quality of life. These encouraging metabolic and weight effects come with a downside, namely the risk of nutritional deficiencies. Particularly striking is the risk to develop iron deficiency. Postoperatively, the prevalence of iron deficiency varies between 18 and 53 % after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and between 1 and 54 % after sleeve gastrectomy. Therefore, preventive strategies and effective treatment options for iron deficiency are crucial to successfully manage the iron status of patients after bariatric surgery. With this review, we discuss the risks and the contributing factors of developing iron deficiency after bariatric surgery. Furthermore, we highlight the discrepancy in the diagnosis of iron deficiency, iron deficiency anaemia and anaemia and highlight the evidence supporting the current nutritional recommendations in the field of bariatric research. In conclusion, we advocate for more nutrition-related research in patient populations in order to provide strong evidence-based guidelines after bariatric surgery. SN - 1475-2719 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29619914/Iron_deficiency_after_bariatric_surgery:_what_is_the_real_problem L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0029665118000149/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -