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Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in pediatrics: a report of seven cases from Saudi Arabia.
Front Med. 2019 Feb; 13(1):126-130.FM

Abstract

Infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in 2012 as an important respiratory disease with high fatality rates of 40%-60%. Despite the increased number of cases over subsequent years, the number of pediatric cases remained low. A review of studies conducted from June 2012 to April 19, 2016 reported 31 pediatric MERS-CoV cases. In this paper, we present the clinical and laboratory features of seven patients with pediatric MERS. Five patients had no underlying medical illnesses, and three patients were asymptomatic. Of the seven cases, four (57%) patients sought medical advice within 1-7 days from the onset of symptoms. The three other patients (43%) were asymptomatic and were in contact with patients with confirmed diagnosis of MERS-CoV. The most common presenting symptoms were fever (57%), cough (14%), shortness of breath (14%), vomiting (28%), and diarrhea (28%). Two (28.6%) patients had platelet counts of < 150 × 109/L, and one patient had an underlying end-stage renal disease. The remaining patients presented with normal blood count, liver function, and urea and creatinine levels. The documented MERS-CoV Ct values were 32-38 for four of the seven cases. Two patients (28.6%) had abnormal chest radiographic findings of bilateral infiltration. One patient (14.3%) required ventilator support, and two patients (28.6%) required oxygen supplementation. All the seven patients were discharged without complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of British Columbia, Vancouver, V6T 1Z4, Canada. Corona Center, Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Pediatric, Prince Mohamed Bin Abdulaziz Hospital, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, 11676, Saudi Arabia.Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, 46202, USA. Johns Hopkins Aramco Healthcare, Dhahran, 31311, Saudi Arabia.Department of Surgery, King Saud University, Riyadh, 11692, Saudi Arabia.College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, 11533, Saudi Arabia. zmemish@yahoo.com. Infectious Diseases Division, Department of Medicine, Prince Mohamed Bin Abdulaziz Hospital, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, 11676, Saudi Arabia. zmemish@yahoo.com. Hubert Department of Global Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. zmemish@yahoo.com.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29623560

Citation

Alfaraj, Sarah H., et al. "Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Pediatrics: a Report of Seven Cases From Saudi Arabia." Frontiers of Medicine, vol. 13, no. 1, 2019, pp. 126-130.
Alfaraj SH, Al-Tawfiq JA, Altuwaijri TA, et al. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in pediatrics: a report of seven cases from Saudi Arabia. Front Med. 2019;13(1):126-130.
Alfaraj, S. H., Al-Tawfiq, J. A., Altuwaijri, T. A., & Memish, Z. A. (2019). Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in pediatrics: a report of seven cases from Saudi Arabia. Frontiers of Medicine, 13(1), 126-130. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11684-017-0603-y
Alfaraj SH, et al. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus in Pediatrics: a Report of Seven Cases From Saudi Arabia. Front Med. 2019;13(1):126-130. PubMed PMID: 29623560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in pediatrics: a report of seven cases from Saudi Arabia. AU - Alfaraj,Sarah H, AU - Al-Tawfiq,Jaffar A, AU - Altuwaijri,Talal A, AU - Memish,Ziad A, Y1 - 2018/04/06/ PY - 2017/06/19/received PY - 2017/10/23/accepted PY - 2018/4/7/pubmed PY - 2019/7/19/medline PY - 2018/4/7/entrez KW - MERS-CoV KW - Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus KW - pediatrics KW - pregnancy SP - 126 EP - 130 JF - Frontiers of medicine JO - Front Med VL - 13 IS - 1 N2 - Infection with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) emerged in 2012 as an important respiratory disease with high fatality rates of 40%-60%. Despite the increased number of cases over subsequent years, the number of pediatric cases remained low. A review of studies conducted from June 2012 to April 19, 2016 reported 31 pediatric MERS-CoV cases. In this paper, we present the clinical and laboratory features of seven patients with pediatric MERS. Five patients had no underlying medical illnesses, and three patients were asymptomatic. Of the seven cases, four (57%) patients sought medical advice within 1-7 days from the onset of symptoms. The three other patients (43%) were asymptomatic and were in contact with patients with confirmed diagnosis of MERS-CoV. The most common presenting symptoms were fever (57%), cough (14%), shortness of breath (14%), vomiting (28%), and diarrhea (28%). Two (28.6%) patients had platelet counts of < 150 × 109/L, and one patient had an underlying end-stage renal disease. The remaining patients presented with normal blood count, liver function, and urea and creatinine levels. The documented MERS-CoV Ct values were 32-38 for four of the seven cases. Two patients (28.6%) had abnormal chest radiographic findings of bilateral infiltration. One patient (14.3%) required ventilator support, and two patients (28.6%) required oxygen supplementation. All the seven patients were discharged without complications. SN - 2095-0225 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29623560/Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus_in_pediatrics:_a_report_of_seven_cases_from_Saudi_Arabia_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11684-017-0603-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -