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The effects of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplementation on blood parameters of renal function: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials.
Nutrition. 2018 Jul - Aug; 51-52:104-113.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Recent studies have demonstrated promising results regarding possible improvements in renal function after prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplementation. The aim of this review was to demonstrate whether such supplementation will improve renal profile indexes including glomerular filtration rate (GFR), creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), uric acid (UA), and urea.

METHOD

The meta-analysis included all studies that examined the effect of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplements on one or more renal function parameters and had a control group. We searched July 1967 through to March 2016 MEDLINE, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases.

RESULTS

Of 437 studies, 13 were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. GFR levels tended to be reduced; whereas creatinine levels increased in the intervention group compared with the placebo group, both in a non-significant manner. The pooled effect on BUN demonstrated a significant decline compared with the placebo group (MD, -1.72 mmol/L; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.93 to -0.51; P = 0.005). Urea significantly decreased after intervention (-0.46 mmol/L; 95% CI, -0.60 to -0.32; P <0.0001). The UA levels significantly increased in the intervention group compared with the placebo group (12.28 µmol/L; 95% CI, 0.85-23.71; P = 0.035).

CONCLUSION

This study showed a significant increase in UA and a decrease in urea and BUN. The use of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplements among those with compromised renal function or those at risk for renal failure should be limited until large-scale, well-designed randomized controlled trials prove the safety and efficacy of these supplements in improving renal function.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, University Putra Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Department of Community Nutrition, School of Nutrition and Food Science, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. Electronic address: F_haghighatdoost@nutr.mui.ac.ir.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29626749

Citation

Firouzi, Somayyeh, and Fahimeh Haghighatdoost. "The Effects of Prebiotic, Probiotic, and Synbiotic Supplementation On Blood Parameters of Renal Function: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Clinical Trials." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 51-52, 2018, pp. 104-113.
Firouzi S, Haghighatdoost F. The effects of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplementation on blood parameters of renal function: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. Nutrition. 2018;51-52:104-113.
Firouzi, S., & Haghighatdoost, F. (2018). The effects of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplementation on blood parameters of renal function: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 51-52, 104-113. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2018.01.007
Firouzi S, Haghighatdoost F. The Effects of Prebiotic, Probiotic, and Synbiotic Supplementation On Blood Parameters of Renal Function: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Clinical Trials. Nutrition. 2018 Jul - Aug;51-52:104-113. PubMed PMID: 29626749.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplementation on blood parameters of renal function: A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. AU - Firouzi,Somayyeh, AU - Haghighatdoost,Fahimeh, Y1 - 2018/02/06/ PY - 2017/01/16/received PY - 2017/12/16/revised PY - 2018/01/09/accepted PY - 2018/4/8/pubmed PY - 2019/10/28/medline PY - 2018/4/8/entrez KW - Blood urea nitrogen KW - Creatinine KW - Glomerular filtration rate KW - Prebiotic KW - Probiotic SP - 104 EP - 113 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 51-52 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have demonstrated promising results regarding possible improvements in renal function after prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplementation. The aim of this review was to demonstrate whether such supplementation will improve renal profile indexes including glomerular filtration rate (GFR), creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), uric acid (UA), and urea. METHOD: The meta-analysis included all studies that examined the effect of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplements on one or more renal function parameters and had a control group. We searched July 1967 through to March 2016 MEDLINE, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. RESULTS: Of 437 studies, 13 were eligible for inclusion in the meta-analysis. GFR levels tended to be reduced; whereas creatinine levels increased in the intervention group compared with the placebo group, both in a non-significant manner. The pooled effect on BUN demonstrated a significant decline compared with the placebo group (MD, -1.72 mmol/L; 95% confidence interval [CI], -2.93 to -0.51; P = 0.005). Urea significantly decreased after intervention (-0.46 mmol/L; 95% CI, -0.60 to -0.32; P <0.0001). The UA levels significantly increased in the intervention group compared with the placebo group (12.28 µmol/L; 95% CI, 0.85-23.71; P = 0.035). CONCLUSION: This study showed a significant increase in UA and a decrease in urea and BUN. The use of prebiotic, probiotic, and synbiotic supplements among those with compromised renal function or those at risk for renal failure should be limited until large-scale, well-designed randomized controlled trials prove the safety and efficacy of these supplements in improving renal function. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29626749/The_effects_of_prebiotic_probiotic_and_synbiotic_supplementation_on_blood_parameters_of_renal_function:_A_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_clinical_trials_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(18)30022-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -