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Dietary Patterns Associated with Cognitive Function among the Older People in Underdeveloped Regions: Finding from the NCDFaC Study.
Nutrients. 2018 Apr 09; 10(4)N

Abstract

Although dietary patterns are crucial to cognitive function, associations of dietary patterns with cognitive function have not yet been fully understood. This cross-sectional study explored dietary patterns associated with cognitive function among the older adults in underdeveloped regions, using 1504 community-dwelling older adults aged 60 and over. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire and 24-h dietary recall. Factor analysis was used to extract dietary patterns. Global cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Two dietary patterns, a "mushroom, vegetable, and fruits" (MVF) pattern and a "meat and soybean products" (MS) pattern, were identified. The MVF pattern, characterized by high consumption of mushrooms, vegetables, and fruits was significantly positively associated with cognitive function (p < 0.05), with an odds ratio of (95% CIs) 0.60 (0.38, 0.94) for cognitive impairment and β (95% CIs) 0.15 (0.02, 0.29) for -log (31-MMSE score). The MS pattern, characterized by high consumption of soybean products and meat, was also associated with better cognitive function, with an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% CIs 0.30, 0.74) for cognitive impairment and β (95% CIs) 0.34 (0.21, 0.47) for -log (31-MMSE score). Our results suggested that both the MVF and MS patterns were positively associated with better cognitive function among older adults in underdeveloped regions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. yinzx@chinacdc.cn. Division of Non-Communicable Diseases Control and Community Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 155 Changbai Road, Changping District, Beijing 102206, China. yinzx@chinacdc.cn.Shanxi Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 8 Xiaonanguan Street, Taiyuan 030012, China. 13753122807@163.com.National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. zhangjian@ninh.chinacdc.cn.Shanxi Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 8 Xiaonanguan Street, Taiyuan 030012, China. zpr0504@163.com.Linyi Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 1159 Shuangtanan Road, Linyi 044100, China. lyjkzxmbk@163.com.Duke Molecular Physiology Institute and Division of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, 300 North Duke St, Durham, NC 27701, USA. kraus004@duke.edu.National Center for Chronic and Non-Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. wangzhuoqun1016@163.com.National Center for Chronic and Non-Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. zhangmei@ncncd.chinacdc.cn.Division of Non-Communicable Diseases Control and Community Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 155 Changbai Road, Changping District, Beijing 102206, China. zhaiiahz@163.com.National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. spk_8210@163.com.National Center for Chronic and Non-Communicable Diseases Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. zhaoyanfang@ncncd.chinacdc.cn.National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. shaojiepang@126.com.College of Biochemical Engineering, Beijing Union University, 18 Zone three, Fatouxili, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100023, China. msq365@hotmail.com.National Institute for Nutrition and Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 27 Nanwei Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100050, China. zhaowh@chinacdc.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29642510

Citation

Yin, Zhaoxue, et al. "Dietary Patterns Associated With Cognitive Function Among the Older People in Underdeveloped Regions: Finding From the NCDFaC Study." Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 4, 2018.
Yin Z, Chen J, Zhang J, et al. Dietary Patterns Associated with Cognitive Function among the Older People in Underdeveloped Regions: Finding from the NCDFaC Study. Nutrients. 2018;10(4).
Yin, Z., Chen, J., Zhang, J., Ren, Z., Dong, K., Kraus, V. B., Wang, Z., Zhang, M., Zhai, Y., Song, P., Zhao, Y., Pang, S., Mi, S., & Zhao, W. (2018). Dietary Patterns Associated with Cognitive Function among the Older People in Underdeveloped Regions: Finding from the NCDFaC Study. Nutrients, 10(4). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10040464
Yin Z, et al. Dietary Patterns Associated With Cognitive Function Among the Older People in Underdeveloped Regions: Finding From the NCDFaC Study. Nutrients. 2018 Apr 9;10(4) PubMed PMID: 29642510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Patterns Associated with Cognitive Function among the Older People in Underdeveloped Regions: Finding from the NCDFaC Study. AU - Yin,Zhaoxue, AU - Chen,Jing, AU - Zhang,Jian, AU - Ren,Zeping, AU - Dong,Kui, AU - Kraus,Virginia B, AU - Wang,Zhuoqun, AU - Zhang,Mei, AU - Zhai,Yi, AU - Song,Pengkun, AU - Zhao,Yanfang, AU - Pang,Shaojie, AU - Mi,Shengquan, AU - Zhao,Wenhua, Y1 - 2018/04/09/ PY - 2018/02/01/received PY - 2018/03/30/revised PY - 2018/03/30/accepted PY - 2018/4/13/entrez PY - 2018/4/13/pubmed PY - 2018/9/18/medline KW - cognitive function KW - dietary pattern KW - factor analysis KW - older adults JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - Although dietary patterns are crucial to cognitive function, associations of dietary patterns with cognitive function have not yet been fully understood. This cross-sectional study explored dietary patterns associated with cognitive function among the older adults in underdeveloped regions, using 1504 community-dwelling older adults aged 60 and over. Diet was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire and 24-h dietary recall. Factor analysis was used to extract dietary patterns. Global cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Two dietary patterns, a "mushroom, vegetable, and fruits" (MVF) pattern and a "meat and soybean products" (MS) pattern, were identified. The MVF pattern, characterized by high consumption of mushrooms, vegetables, and fruits was significantly positively associated with cognitive function (p < 0.05), with an odds ratio of (95% CIs) 0.60 (0.38, 0.94) for cognitive impairment and β (95% CIs) 0.15 (0.02, 0.29) for -log (31-MMSE score). The MS pattern, characterized by high consumption of soybean products and meat, was also associated with better cognitive function, with an odds ratio of 0.47 (95% CIs 0.30, 0.74) for cognitive impairment and β (95% CIs) 0.34 (0.21, 0.47) for -log (31-MMSE score). Our results suggested that both the MVF and MS patterns were positively associated with better cognitive function among older adults in underdeveloped regions. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29642510/Dietary_Patterns_Associated_with_Cognitive_Function_among_the_Older_People_in_Underdeveloped_Regions:_Finding_from_the_NCDFaC_Study_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu10040464 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -