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Mental rotation: effects of dimensionality of objects and type of task.
J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1988 Feb; 14(1):3-11.JE

Abstract

The original studies of mental rotation estimated rates of imagining rotations that were much slower when two simultaneously portrayed three-dimensional shapes were to be compared (R. Shepard & J. Metzler) than when one two-dimensional shape was to be compared with a previously learned two-dimensional shape (Cooper and her associates). In a 2 X 2 design, we orthogonally varied dimensionality of objects and type of task. Both factors affected reaction times. Type of task was the primary determiner of estimated rate of mental rotation, which was about three times higher for the single-stimulus task. Dimensionality primarily affected an additive component of all reaction times, suggesting that more initial encoding is required for three-dimensional shapes. In the absence of a satisfactory way of controlling stimulus complexity, the results are at least consistent with the proposal that once three-dimensional objects have been encoded, their rotation can be imagined as rapidly as the rotation of two-dimensional shapes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tufts University.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2964504

Citation

Shepard, S, and D Metzler. "Mental Rotation: Effects of Dimensionality of Objects and Type of Task." Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, vol. 14, no. 1, 1988, pp. 3-11.
Shepard S, Metzler D. Mental rotation: effects of dimensionality of objects and type of task. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1988;14(1):3-11.
Shepard, S., & Metzler, D. (1988). Mental rotation: effects of dimensionality of objects and type of task. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, 14(1), 3-11.
Shepard S, Metzler D. Mental Rotation: Effects of Dimensionality of Objects and Type of Task. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 1988;14(1):3-11. PubMed PMID: 2964504.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mental rotation: effects of dimensionality of objects and type of task. AU - Shepard,S, AU - Metzler,D, PY - 1988/2/1/pubmed PY - 1988/2/1/medline PY - 1988/2/1/entrez SP - 3 EP - 11 JF - Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance JO - J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - The original studies of mental rotation estimated rates of imagining rotations that were much slower when two simultaneously portrayed three-dimensional shapes were to be compared (R. Shepard & J. Metzler) than when one two-dimensional shape was to be compared with a previously learned two-dimensional shape (Cooper and her associates). In a 2 X 2 design, we orthogonally varied dimensionality of objects and type of task. Both factors affected reaction times. Type of task was the primary determiner of estimated rate of mental rotation, which was about three times higher for the single-stimulus task. Dimensionality primarily affected an additive component of all reaction times, suggesting that more initial encoding is required for three-dimensional shapes. In the absence of a satisfactory way of controlling stimulus complexity, the results are at least consistent with the proposal that once three-dimensional objects have been encoded, their rotation can be imagined as rapidly as the rotation of two-dimensional shapes. SN - 0096-1523 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2964504/Mental_rotation:_effects_of_dimensionality_of_objects_and_type_of_task_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/xhp/14/1/3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -