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Associations of sarcopenic obesity with the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance over five years in older men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project.
Exp Gerontol. 2018 07 15; 108:99-105.EG

Abstract

PURPOSE

Previous cross-sectional studies investigating associations of sarcopenic obesity with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and insulin resistance have not utilised consensus definitions of sarcopenia. We aimed to determine associations of sarcopenic obesity with MetS and insulin resistance over five years in community-dwelling older men.

METHODS

1231 men aged ≥70 years had appendicular lean mass (ALM) and body fat percentage assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and hand grip strength and gait speed tests. Sarcopenia was defined as low ALM/height (m2) and low hand grip strength or gait speed (European Working Group definition); obesity was defined as body fat percentage ≥30%. MetS was assessed at baseline and 5-years later. Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) was assessed at 5-years only.

RESULTS

Men with sarcopenic obesity (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.07, 1.21-3.55) and non-sarcopenic obesity (4.19, 3.16-5.57) had higher MetS likelihood than those with non-sarcopenic non-obesity at baseline. Higher gait speed predicted lower odds for prevalent MetS (0.45, 0.21-0.96 per m/s). Higher body fat predicted increased odds for prevalent and incident MetS (1.14, 1.11-1.17 and 1.11, 1.02-1.20 per kg, respectively) and deleterious 5-year changes in MetS fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (all P < 0.05). Compared with non-sarcopenic non-obesity, estimated marginal means for HOMA-IR at 5-years were higher in non-sarcopenic obesity only (1.0, 0.8-1.1 vs 1.3, 1.2-1.5; P < 0.001). Similar results were observed when sarcopenic obesity was defined by waist circumference.

CONCLUSIONS

Sarcopenic obesity does not appear to confer greater risk for incident MetS or insulin resistance than obesity alone in community-dwelling older men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Clinical Sciences at Monash Health, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine and Australian Institute for Musculoskeletal Science, Melbourne Medical School-Western Campus, The University of Melbourne, St Albans, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: david.scott@monash.edu.School of Public Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; The ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.ANZAC Research Institute & Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Department of Andrology, Concord Hospital, ANZAC Research Institute, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Bone Research Program, ANZAC Research Institute, Dept of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Concord Hospital, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Centre for Education and Research on Ageing, Concord Hospital, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.The ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Charles Perkins Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29649572

Citation

Scott, David, et al. "Associations of Sarcopenic Obesity With the Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance Over Five Years in Older Men: the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project." Experimental Gerontology, vol. 108, 2018, pp. 99-105.
Scott D, Cumming R, Naganathan V, et al. Associations of sarcopenic obesity with the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance over five years in older men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project. Exp Gerontol. 2018;108:99-105.
Scott, D., Cumming, R., Naganathan, V., Blyth, F., Le Couteur, D. G., Handelsman, D. J., Seibel, M., Waite, L. M., & Hirani, V. (2018). Associations of sarcopenic obesity with the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance over five years in older men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project. Experimental Gerontology, 108, 99-105. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.exger.2018.04.006
Scott D, et al. Associations of Sarcopenic Obesity With the Metabolic Syndrome and Insulin Resistance Over Five Years in Older Men: the Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project. Exp Gerontol. 2018 07 15;108:99-105. PubMed PMID: 29649572.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations of sarcopenic obesity with the metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance over five years in older men: The Concord Health and Ageing in Men Project. AU - Scott,David, AU - Cumming,Robert, AU - Naganathan,Vasi, AU - Blyth,Fiona, AU - Le Couteur,David G, AU - Handelsman,David J, AU - Seibel,Markus, AU - Waite,Louise M, AU - Hirani,Vasant, Y1 - 2018/04/09/ PY - 2017/08/31/received PY - 2018/03/20/revised PY - 2018/04/06/accepted PY - 2018/4/13/pubmed PY - 2019/5/6/medline PY - 2018/4/13/entrez KW - Ageing KW - Insulin resistance KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - Obesity KW - Sarcopenia SP - 99 EP - 105 JF - Experimental gerontology JO - Exp Gerontol VL - 108 N2 - PURPOSE: Previous cross-sectional studies investigating associations of sarcopenic obesity with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and insulin resistance have not utilised consensus definitions of sarcopenia. We aimed to determine associations of sarcopenic obesity with MetS and insulin resistance over five years in community-dwelling older men. METHODS: 1231 men aged ≥70 years had appendicular lean mass (ALM) and body fat percentage assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and hand grip strength and gait speed tests. Sarcopenia was defined as low ALM/height (m2) and low hand grip strength or gait speed (European Working Group definition); obesity was defined as body fat percentage ≥30%. MetS was assessed at baseline and 5-years later. Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) was assessed at 5-years only. RESULTS: Men with sarcopenic obesity (odds ratio, 95% CI: 2.07, 1.21-3.55) and non-sarcopenic obesity (4.19, 3.16-5.57) had higher MetS likelihood than those with non-sarcopenic non-obesity at baseline. Higher gait speed predicted lower odds for prevalent MetS (0.45, 0.21-0.96 per m/s). Higher body fat predicted increased odds for prevalent and incident MetS (1.14, 1.11-1.17 and 1.11, 1.02-1.20 per kg, respectively) and deleterious 5-year changes in MetS fasting glucose, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (all P < 0.05). Compared with non-sarcopenic non-obesity, estimated marginal means for HOMA-IR at 5-years were higher in non-sarcopenic obesity only (1.0, 0.8-1.1 vs 1.3, 1.2-1.5; P < 0.001). Similar results were observed when sarcopenic obesity was defined by waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS: Sarcopenic obesity does not appear to confer greater risk for incident MetS or insulin resistance than obesity alone in community-dwelling older men. SN - 1873-6815 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29649572/Associations_of_sarcopenic_obesity_with_the_metabolic_syndrome_and_insulin_resistance_over_five_years_in_older_men:_The_Concord_Health_and_Ageing_in_Men_Project_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0531-5565(17)30634-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -