Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of Serum Soluble CD163 with Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis, Especially in Anti-MDA5 Antibody-positive Cases.
J Rheumatol 2018; 45(7):947-955JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We elucidated the association of serum soluble CD163 (sCD163) with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD), autoantibody profiles, and serum ferritin in patients with polymyositis (PM), classic dermatomyositis (DM), and clinical amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM).

METHODS

Serum sCD163 levels were retrospectively measured by ELISA in patients with PM, classic DM, and CADM, as well as in healthy controls (HC). Repeat sera samples were obtained posttreatment from available patients. The associations between serum sCD163 levels and clinical information were analyzed.

RESULTS

Serum sCD163 levels in patients with PM/classic DM/CADM were significantly higher than those in HC (n = 72, 56, 34, and 68, respectively; p < 0.001 for all comparisons). No significant difference was observed between serum sCD163 levels in patients with and without ILD (p = 0.16) or between those with RP-ILD and chronic ILD (p = 0.21). Serum sCD163 levels were significantly higher in patients with anti-MDA5 antibodies (n = 27) than in those without (p = 0.001). Serum sCD163 levels were weakly correlated with serum ferritin levels in the patients with PM, classic DM, and CADM (r = 0.21). Serum sCD163 levels decreased significantly following treatment in all patient groups (p = 0.003).

CONCLUSION

The present results suggest an association of serum sCD163 with PM, classic DM, and CADM, especially in anti-MDA5 antibody-positive cases. However, serum sCD163 levels were not specifically associated with ILD or RP-ILD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. H. Kawasumi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Katsumata, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; N. Nishino, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; S. Hirahara, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Kawaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; M. Kuwana, MD, PhD, Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine; H. Yamanaka, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University.From the Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. katsumata@twmu.ac.jp. H. Kawasumi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Katsumata, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; N. Nishino, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; S. Hirahara, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Kawaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; M. Kuwana, MD, PhD, Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine; H. Yamanaka, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University. katsumata@twmu.ac.jp.From the Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. H. Kawasumi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Katsumata, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; N. Nishino, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; S. Hirahara, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Kawaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; M. Kuwana, MD, PhD, Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine; H. Yamanaka, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University.From the Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. H. Kawasumi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Katsumata, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; N. Nishino, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; S. Hirahara, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Kawaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; M. Kuwana, MD, PhD, Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine; H. Yamanaka, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University.From the Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. H. Kawasumi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Katsumata, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; N. Nishino, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; S. Hirahara, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Kawaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; M. Kuwana, MD, PhD, Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine; H. Yamanaka, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University.From the Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. H. Kawasumi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Katsumata, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; N. Nishino, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; S. Hirahara, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Kawaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; M. Kuwana, MD, PhD, Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine; H. Yamanaka, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University.From the Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. H. Kawasumi, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Katsumata, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; N. Nishino, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; S. Hirahara, MD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Y. Kawaguchi, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; M. Kuwana, MD, PhD, Department of Allergy and Rheumatology, Nippon Medical School Graduate School of Medicine; H. Yamanaka, MD, PhD, Institute of Rheumatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29657141

Citation

Kawasumi, Hidenaga, et al. "Association of Serum Soluble CD163 With Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis, Especially in Anti-MDA5 Antibody-positive Cases." The Journal of Rheumatology, vol. 45, no. 7, 2018, pp. 947-955.
Kawasumi H, Katsumata Y, Nishino A, et al. Association of Serum Soluble CD163 with Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis, Especially in Anti-MDA5 Antibody-positive Cases. J Rheumatol. 2018;45(7):947-955.
Kawasumi, H., Katsumata, Y., Nishino, A., Hirahara, S., Kawaguchi, Y., Kuwana, M., & Yamanaka, H. (2018). Association of Serum Soluble CD163 with Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis, Especially in Anti-MDA5 Antibody-positive Cases. The Journal of Rheumatology, 45(7), pp. 947-955. doi:10.3899/jrheum.170997.
Kawasumi H, et al. Association of Serum Soluble CD163 With Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis, Especially in Anti-MDA5 Antibody-positive Cases. J Rheumatol. 2018;45(7):947-955. PubMed PMID: 29657141.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Serum Soluble CD163 with Polymyositis and Dermatomyositis, Especially in Anti-MDA5 Antibody-positive Cases. AU - Kawasumi,Hidenaga, AU - Katsumata,Yasuhiro, AU - Nishino,Akira, AU - Hirahara,Shinya, AU - Kawaguchi,Yasushi, AU - Kuwana,Masataka, AU - Yamanaka,Hisashi, Y1 - 2018/04/15/ PY - 2018/01/19/accepted PY - 2018/4/17/pubmed PY - 2019/11/15/medline PY - 2018/4/17/entrez KW - DERMATOMYOSITIS KW - FERRITINS KW - INTERSTITIAL LUNG DISEASE KW - MDA5 KW - POLYMYOSITIS SP - 947 EP - 955 JF - The Journal of rheumatology JO - J. Rheumatol. VL - 45 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We elucidated the association of serum soluble CD163 (sCD163) with rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease (RP-ILD), autoantibody profiles, and serum ferritin in patients with polymyositis (PM), classic dermatomyositis (DM), and clinical amyopathic dermatomyositis (CADM). METHODS: Serum sCD163 levels were retrospectively measured by ELISA in patients with PM, classic DM, and CADM, as well as in healthy controls (HC). Repeat sera samples were obtained posttreatment from available patients. The associations between serum sCD163 levels and clinical information were analyzed. RESULTS: Serum sCD163 levels in patients with PM/classic DM/CADM were significantly higher than those in HC (n = 72, 56, 34, and 68, respectively; p < 0.001 for all comparisons). No significant difference was observed between serum sCD163 levels in patients with and without ILD (p = 0.16) or between those with RP-ILD and chronic ILD (p = 0.21). Serum sCD163 levels were significantly higher in patients with anti-MDA5 antibodies (n = 27) than in those without (p = 0.001). Serum sCD163 levels were weakly correlated with serum ferritin levels in the patients with PM, classic DM, and CADM (r = 0.21). Serum sCD163 levels decreased significantly following treatment in all patient groups (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: The present results suggest an association of serum sCD163 with PM, classic DM, and CADM, especially in anti-MDA5 antibody-positive cases. However, serum sCD163 levels were not specifically associated with ILD or RP-ILD. SN - 0315-162X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29657141/Association_of_Serum_Soluble_CD163_with_Polymyositis_and_Dermatomyositis_Especially_in_Anti_MDA5_Antibody_positive_Cases_ L2 - http://www.jrheum.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=29657141 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -