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Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys.
Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2019 03; 302(3):512-539.AR

Abstract

Lampreys, together with hagfishes, are the only extant representatives of the oldest branch of vertebrates, the agnathans, which are the sister group of gnathostomes; therefore, studies on these animals are of great evolutionary significance. Lampreys exhibit a particular life cycle with remarkable changes in their behavior, concomitant, in part, with important modifications in the head and its musculature, which might influence the development of the cranial nerves. In this context, some cranial nerves such as the optic nerve and the ocular motor nerves, which develop slowly during an extremely long larval period lasting more than five years, have been more thoroughly investigated; however, much less experimental information is available about others, such as the facial or the hypoglossal nerves. In addition, the possible existence of a "true" accessory nerve in these animals is still a matter of conjecture. Although growing in last decades, investigations on the physiology of the lamprey cranial nerves is scanty. This review focuses on past and recent findings that have contributed to characterize the anatomical organization of the cranial nerves in lampreys, including their components and nuclei, and their relations in the brain; in addition, comments on their development and functional role are also included. Anat Rec, 302:512-539, 2019. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neurolam Group, Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology - IBIV, University of Vigo, Vigo, 36310, Spain.Neurolam Group, Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology - IBIV, University of Vigo, Vigo, 36310, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29659164

Citation

Pombal, Manuel A., and Manuel Megías. "Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys." Anatomical Record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007), vol. 302, no. 3, 2019, pp. 512-539.
Pombal MA, Megías M. Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2019;302(3):512-539.
Pombal, M. A., & Megías, M. (2019). Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys. Anatomical Record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007), 302(3), 512-539. https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.23821
Pombal MA, Megías M. Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2019;302(3):512-539. PubMed PMID: 29659164.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Development and Functional Organization of the Cranial Nerves in Lampreys. AU - Pombal,Manuel A, AU - Megías,Manuel, Y1 - 2018/05/04/ PY - 2017/04/28/received PY - 2017/08/15/revised PY - 2017/09/17/accepted PY - 2018/4/17/pubmed PY - 2020/5/13/medline PY - 2018/4/17/entrez KW - agnathans KW - cyclostomes KW - evolution KW - innervation KW - motor nuclei KW - sensory systems KW - vertebrates SP - 512 EP - 539 JF - Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007) JO - Anat Rec (Hoboken) VL - 302 IS - 3 N2 - Lampreys, together with hagfishes, are the only extant representatives of the oldest branch of vertebrates, the agnathans, which are the sister group of gnathostomes; therefore, studies on these animals are of great evolutionary significance. Lampreys exhibit a particular life cycle with remarkable changes in their behavior, concomitant, in part, with important modifications in the head and its musculature, which might influence the development of the cranial nerves. In this context, some cranial nerves such as the optic nerve and the ocular motor nerves, which develop slowly during an extremely long larval period lasting more than five years, have been more thoroughly investigated; however, much less experimental information is available about others, such as the facial or the hypoglossal nerves. In addition, the possible existence of a "true" accessory nerve in these animals is still a matter of conjecture. Although growing in last decades, investigations on the physiology of the lamprey cranial nerves is scanty. This review focuses on past and recent findings that have contributed to characterize the anatomical organization of the cranial nerves in lampreys, including their components and nuclei, and their relations in the brain; in addition, comments on their development and functional role are also included. Anat Rec, 302:512-539, 2019. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. SN - 1932-8494 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29659164/Development_and_Functional_Organization_of_the_Cranial_Nerves_in_Lampreys_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.23821 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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