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Chloromethane formation and degradation in the fern phyllosphere.
Sci Total Environ 2018; 634:1278-1287ST

Abstract

Chloromethane (CH3Cl) is the most abundant halogenated trace gas in the atmosphere. It plays an important role in natural stratospheric ozone destruction. Current estimates of the global CH3Cl budget are approximate. The strength of the CH3Cl global sink by microbial degradation in soils and plants is under discussion. Some plants, particularly ferns, have been identified as substantial emitters of CH3Cl. Their ability to degrade CH3Cl remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the potential of leaves from 3 abundant ferns (Osmunda regalis, Cyathea cooperi, Dryopteris filix-mas) to produce and degrade CH3Cl by measuring their production and consumption rates and their stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures. Investigated ferns are able to degrade CH3Cl at rates from 2.1 to 17 and 0.3 to 0.9μggdw-1day-1 for C. cooperi and D. filix-mas respectively, depending on CH3Cl supplementation and temperature. The stable carbon isotope enrichment factor of remaining CH3Cl was -39±13‰, whereas negligible isotope fractionation was observed for hydrogen (-8±19‰). In contrast, O. regalis did not consume CH3Cl, but produced it at rates ranging from 0.6 to 128μggdw-1day-1, with stable isotope values of -97±8‰ for carbon and -202±10‰ for hydrogen, respectively. Even though the 3 ferns showed clearly different formation and consumption patterns, their leaf-associated bacterial diversity was not notably different. Moreover, we did not detect genes associated with the only known chloromethane utilization pathway "cmu" in the microbial phyllosphere of the investigated ferns. Our study suggests that still unknown CH3Cl biodegradation processes on plants play an important role in global cycling of atmospheric CH3Cl.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Earth Sciences, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 236, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: nicole8jaeger@gmail.com.Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF), UMR6096 CNRS-UCA-Sigma, Clermont-Ferrand, France; Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Strasbourg, France; UMR FARE, Université de Reims Champagne Ardenne, INRA, Reims, France.Institute of Earth Sciences, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 236, Heidelberg, Germany.Institute of Earth Sciences, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 236, Heidelberg, Germany.Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF), UMR6096 CNRS-UCA-Sigma, Clermont-Ferrand, France.Université Clermont Auvergne, INRA, MEDIS, Clermont-Ferrand, France.Institute of Earth Sciences, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 236, Heidelberg, Germany.Microbial Biogeochemistry, Research Area Landscape Functioning, Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Müncheberg, Germany.Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Strasbourg, France.Université Clermont Auvergne, INRA, MEDIS, Clermont-Ferrand, France.Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Strasbourg, France.Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand (ICCF), UMR6096 CNRS-UCA-Sigma, Clermont-Ferrand, France.Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, GMGM UMR 7156, Department of Microbiology, Genomics and the Environment, Strasbourg, France.Institute of Earth Sciences, Heidelberg University, Im Neuenheimer Feld 236, Heidelberg, Germany; Heidelberg Center for the Environment HCE, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: frank.keppler@geow.uni-heidelberg.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29660879

Citation

Jaeger, Nicole, et al. "Chloromethane Formation and Degradation in the Fern Phyllosphere." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 634, 2018, pp. 1278-1287.
Jaeger N, Besaury L, Röhling AN, et al. Chloromethane formation and degradation in the fern phyllosphere. Sci Total Environ. 2018;634:1278-1287.
Jaeger, N., Besaury, L., Röhling, A. N., Koch, F., Delort, A. M., Gasc, C., ... Keppler, F. (2018). Chloromethane formation and degradation in the fern phyllosphere. The Science of the Total Environment, 634, pp. 1278-1287. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.03.316.
Jaeger N, et al. Chloromethane Formation and Degradation in the Fern Phyllosphere. Sci Total Environ. 2018 Sep 1;634:1278-1287. PubMed PMID: 29660879.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chloromethane formation and degradation in the fern phyllosphere. AU - Jaeger,Nicole, AU - Besaury,Ludovic, AU - Röhling,Amelie Ninja, AU - Koch,Fabien, AU - Delort,Anne-Marie, AU - Gasc,Cyrielle, AU - Greule,Markus, AU - Kolb,Steffen, AU - Nadalig,Thierry, AU - Peyret,Pierre, AU - Vuilleumier,Stéphane, AU - Amato,Pierre, AU - Bringel,Françoise, AU - Keppler,Frank, Y1 - 2018/04/18/ PY - 2017/09/27/received PY - 2018/03/25/revised PY - 2018/03/25/accepted PY - 2018/4/18/pubmed PY - 2018/4/18/medline PY - 2018/4/18/entrez KW - Biodegradation KW - Chloromethane KW - Ferns KW - Isotope fractionation KW - Methylotrophic bacteria KW - Phyllosphere SP - 1278 EP - 1287 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci. Total Environ. VL - 634 N2 - Chloromethane (CH3Cl) is the most abundant halogenated trace gas in the atmosphere. It plays an important role in natural stratospheric ozone destruction. Current estimates of the global CH3Cl budget are approximate. The strength of the CH3Cl global sink by microbial degradation in soils and plants is under discussion. Some plants, particularly ferns, have been identified as substantial emitters of CH3Cl. Their ability to degrade CH3Cl remains uncertain. In this study, we investigated the potential of leaves from 3 abundant ferns (Osmunda regalis, Cyathea cooperi, Dryopteris filix-mas) to produce and degrade CH3Cl by measuring their production and consumption rates and their stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures. Investigated ferns are able to degrade CH3Cl at rates from 2.1 to 17 and 0.3 to 0.9μggdw-1day-1 for C. cooperi and D. filix-mas respectively, depending on CH3Cl supplementation and temperature. The stable carbon isotope enrichment factor of remaining CH3Cl was -39±13‰, whereas negligible isotope fractionation was observed for hydrogen (-8±19‰). In contrast, O. regalis did not consume CH3Cl, but produced it at rates ranging from 0.6 to 128μggdw-1day-1, with stable isotope values of -97±8‰ for carbon and -202±10‰ for hydrogen, respectively. Even though the 3 ferns showed clearly different formation and consumption patterns, their leaf-associated bacterial diversity was not notably different. Moreover, we did not detect genes associated with the only known chloromethane utilization pathway "cmu" in the microbial phyllosphere of the investigated ferns. Our study suggests that still unknown CH3Cl biodegradation processes on plants play an important role in global cycling of atmospheric CH3Cl. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29660879/Chloromethane_formation_and_degradation_in_the_fern_phyllosphere_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(18)31076-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -