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Sero-prevalence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) specific antibodies in dromedary camels in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.
J Med Virol. 2018 08; 90(8):1285-1289.JM

Abstract

The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel Coronavirus which was responsible of the first case of human acute respiratory syndrome in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), 2012. Dromedary camels are considered as potential reservoirs for the virus and seem to be the only animal host which may transmit the infection to human. Further studies are required to better understand the animal sources of zoonotic transmission route and the risks of this infection. A primary sero-prevalence study of MERS-CoV preexisting neutralizing antibodies in Dromedary camel serum was conducted in Tabuk, western north region of KSA, in order to assess the seopositivity of these animals and to explain their possible role in the transmission of the infection to Human. One hundred seventy one (171) serum samples were collected from healthy dromedary camels with different ages and genders in Tabuk city and tested for specific serum IgG by ELISA using the receptor-binding S1 subunits of spike proteins of MERS-CoV. 144 (84,21%) of the total camel sera shown the presence of protein-specific antibodies against MERS-CoV. These results may provide evidence that MERS-CoV has previously infected dromedary camels in Tabuk and may support the possible role of camels in the human infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Prince Fahd Bin Sultan Research Chair (PFBSRC), Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Medical Laboratory Technology Department, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, KSA. Laboratory of Communicable Diseases and Biologically Active Substances, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Monastir, Monastir, Tunisia.Prince Fahd Bin Sultan Research Chair (PFBSRC), Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Medical Laboratory Technology Department, University of Tabuk, Tabuk, KSA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29663439

Citation

Harrath, Rafik, and Faisel M. Abu Duhier. "Sero-prevalence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Specific Antibodies in Dromedary Camels in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 90, no. 8, 2018, pp. 1285-1289.
Harrath R, Abu Duhier FM. Sero-prevalence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) specific antibodies in dromedary camels in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. J Med Virol. 2018;90(8):1285-1289.
Harrath, R., & Abu Duhier, F. M. (2018). Sero-prevalence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) specific antibodies in dromedary camels in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. Journal of Medical Virology, 90(8), 1285-1289. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25186
Harrath R, Abu Duhier FM. Sero-prevalence of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Specific Antibodies in Dromedary Camels in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. J Med Virol. 2018;90(8):1285-1289. PubMed PMID: 29663439.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sero-prevalence of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) specific antibodies in dromedary camels in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia. AU - Harrath,Rafik, AU - Abu Duhier,Faisel M, Y1 - 2018/04/26/ PY - 2017/11/30/received PY - 2018/04/03/accepted PY - 2018/4/18/pubmed PY - 2019/6/1/medline PY - 2018/4/18/entrez KW - Coronavirus KW - blood KW - enzyme assays KW - immunoglobulin KW - reservoir SP - 1285 EP - 1289 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J Med Virol VL - 90 IS - 8 N2 - The Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel Coronavirus which was responsible of the first case of human acute respiratory syndrome in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), 2012. Dromedary camels are considered as potential reservoirs for the virus and seem to be the only animal host which may transmit the infection to human. Further studies are required to better understand the animal sources of zoonotic transmission route and the risks of this infection. A primary sero-prevalence study of MERS-CoV preexisting neutralizing antibodies in Dromedary camel serum was conducted in Tabuk, western north region of KSA, in order to assess the seopositivity of these animals and to explain their possible role in the transmission of the infection to Human. One hundred seventy one (171) serum samples were collected from healthy dromedary camels with different ages and genders in Tabuk city and tested for specific serum IgG by ELISA using the receptor-binding S1 subunits of spike proteins of MERS-CoV. 144 (84,21%) of the total camel sera shown the presence of protein-specific antibodies against MERS-CoV. These results may provide evidence that MERS-CoV has previously infected dromedary camels in Tabuk and may support the possible role of camels in the human infection. SN - 1096-9071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29663439/Sero_prevalence_of_Middle_East_respiratory_syndrome_coronavirus__MERS_CoV__specific_antibodies_in_dromedary_camels_in_Tabuk_Saudi_Arabia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25186 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -