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Cranial Pair 0: The Nervus Terminalis.
Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2019 03; 302(3):394-404.AR

Abstract

Originally discovered in elasmobranchs by Fritsh in 1878, the nervus terminalis has been found in virtually all species, including humans. After more than one-century debate on its nomenclature, it is nowadays recognized as cranial pair zero. The nerve mostly originates in the olfactory placode, although neural crest contribution has been also proposed. Developmentally, the nervus terminalis is clearly observed in human embryos; subsequently, during the fetal period loses some of its ganglion cells, and it is less recognizable in adults. Fibers originating in the nasal cavity passes into the cranium through the middle area of the cribiform plate of the ethmoid bone. Intracranially, fibers joint the telencephalon at several sites including the olfactory trigone and the primordium of the hippocampus to reach preoptic and precommissural regions. The nervus terminalis shows ganglion cells, that sometimes form clusters, normally one or two located at the base of the crista galli, the so-called ganglion of the nervus terminalis. Its function is uncertain. It has been described that its fibers facilitates migration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone cells to the hypothalamus thus participating in the development of the hypothalamic-gonadal axis, which alteration may provoke Kallmann's syndrome in humans. This review summarizes current knowledge on this structure, incorporating original illustrations of the nerve at different developmental stages, and focuses on its anatomical and clinical relevance. Anat Rec, 302:394-404, 2019. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departamento de Anatomía y Embriología Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid 28040, Spain.Servicio de Neurología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real 13005, Spain.Servicio de Neurología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real 13005, Spain.Servicio de Neurología, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real 13005, Spain.Servicio de Anatomía Patológica, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real 13005, Spain.Servicio de Anatomía Patológica, Hospital General Universitario de Ciudad Real, Ciudad Real 13005, Spain.Laboratorio de Neuroplasticidad y Neurodegeneración, Facultad de Medicina de Ciudad Real, Centro Regional de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real 13071, Spain.Laboratorio de Neuroplasticidad y Neurodegeneración, Facultad de Medicina de Ciudad Real, Centro Regional de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real 13071, Spain.Laboratorio de Neuroplasticidad y Neurodegeneración, Facultad de Medicina de Ciudad Real, Centro Regional de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real 13071, Spain.Laboratorio de Neuroplasticidad y Neurodegeneración, Facultad de Medicina de Ciudad Real, Centro Regional de Investigaciones Biomédicas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real 13071, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29663690

Citation

Peña-Melián, Ángel, et al. "Cranial Pair 0: the Nervus Terminalis." Anatomical Record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007), vol. 302, no. 3, 2019, pp. 394-404.
Peña-Melián Á, Cabello-de la Rosa JP, Gallardo-Alcañiz MJ, et al. Cranial Pair 0: The Nervus Terminalis. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2019;302(3):394-404.
Peña-Melián, Á., Cabello-de la Rosa, J. P., Gallardo-Alcañiz, M. J., Vaamonde-Gamo, J., Relea-Calatayud, F., González-López, L., Villanueva-Anguita, P., Flores-Cuadrado, A., Saiz-Sánchez, D., & Martínez-Marcos, A. (2019). Cranial Pair 0: The Nervus Terminalis. Anatomical Record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007), 302(3), 394-404. https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.23826
Peña-Melián Á, et al. Cranial Pair 0: the Nervus Terminalis. Anat Rec (Hoboken). 2019;302(3):394-404. PubMed PMID: 29663690.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cranial Pair 0: The Nervus Terminalis. AU - Peña-Melián,Ángel, AU - Cabello-de la Rosa,Juan Pablo, AU - Gallardo-Alcañiz,Maria José, AU - Vaamonde-Gamo,Julia, AU - Relea-Calatayud,Fernanda, AU - González-López,Lucía, AU - Villanueva-Anguita,Patricia, AU - Flores-Cuadrado,Alicia, AU - Saiz-Sánchez,Daniel, AU - Martínez-Marcos,Alino, Y1 - 2018/05/17/ PY - 2017/07/28/received PY - 2017/11/15/revised PY - 2017/12/13/accepted PY - 2018/4/18/pubmed PY - 2020/5/13/medline PY - 2018/4/18/entrez KW - Kallmann's syndrome KW - gonadotropin-releasing hormone KW - luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone KW - olfactory placode SP - 394 EP - 404 JF - Anatomical record (Hoboken, N.J. : 2007) JO - Anat Rec (Hoboken) VL - 302 IS - 3 N2 - Originally discovered in elasmobranchs by Fritsh in 1878, the nervus terminalis has been found in virtually all species, including humans. After more than one-century debate on its nomenclature, it is nowadays recognized as cranial pair zero. The nerve mostly originates in the olfactory placode, although neural crest contribution has been also proposed. Developmentally, the nervus terminalis is clearly observed in human embryos; subsequently, during the fetal period loses some of its ganglion cells, and it is less recognizable in adults. Fibers originating in the nasal cavity passes into the cranium through the middle area of the cribiform plate of the ethmoid bone. Intracranially, fibers joint the telencephalon at several sites including the olfactory trigone and the primordium of the hippocampus to reach preoptic and precommissural regions. The nervus terminalis shows ganglion cells, that sometimes form clusters, normally one or two located at the base of the crista galli, the so-called ganglion of the nervus terminalis. Its function is uncertain. It has been described that its fibers facilitates migration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone cells to the hypothalamus thus participating in the development of the hypothalamic-gonadal axis, which alteration may provoke Kallmann's syndrome in humans. This review summarizes current knowledge on this structure, incorporating original illustrations of the nerve at different developmental stages, and focuses on its anatomical and clinical relevance. Anat Rec, 302:394-404, 2019. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. SN - 1932-8494 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29663690/Cranial_Pair_0:_The_Nervus_Terminalis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ar.23826 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -