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Chemical characterization and source apportionment of aerosol over mid Brahmaputra Valley, India.
Environ Pollut. 2018 Mar; 234:997-1010.EP

Abstract

Aerosol samples (as PM10, n = 250) were collected from three rural/remote receptor locations in the mid Brahmaputra plain region and were chemically characterized for metals (Al, Fe, Co, Cu, Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni, Pb), ions (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, NH4+, F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-), and carbon. Vital ratios like NO3-/SO42-, EC/OC, K+/EC, K+/OC, enrichment factors and inter-species correlations were exploited to appreciate possible sources of aerosol. These empirical analyses pointed towards anthropogenic contributions of aerosol, particularly from biomass burning, vehicular emission, and road dust. The chemically characterized concentration data were subsequently fed into two receptor models viz. Principal Component Analysis-Multiple Linear Regression (PCA-MLR) and Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) for apportionment of sources of aerosol. The PCA-MLR estimates identified that the combustion sources together accounted for ∼42% of aerosol and the contribution of secondary formation to be 24%. Road and crustal dusts have been well apportioned by PCA-MLR, which together accounts for ∼26% of the aerosol. The CMB model estimates explained that the combustion sources taken together contributed ∼47% to the aerosol, which includes biomass burning (27%), vehicular emission (13%), coal (1%), kerosene (4%), and petroleum refining (2%). Other major sources that were apportioned were road dust (15%), crustal dust (26%), and construction dust (6%). There are inherent limitations in the source strength estimations because of uncertainty present in the source emission profiles that have been applied to the remote location of India. However, both the models (PCA-MLR and CMB) estimated the contribution of combustion sources to 42 and 47% respectively, which is comparable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Science, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, India.Department of Environmental Science, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, India.Department of Environmental Science, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, India.Department of Environmental Studies, Visva Bharati, Bengal, India.Department of Environmental Science, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, India; Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, United States. Electronic address: rrh@tezu.ernet.in.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29665640

Citation

Bhuyan, Pranamika, et al. "Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Aerosol Over Mid Brahmaputra Valley, India." Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), vol. 234, 2018, pp. 997-1010.
Bhuyan P, Deka P, Prakash A, et al. Chemical characterization and source apportionment of aerosol over mid Brahmaputra Valley, India. Environ Pollut. 2018;234:997-1010.
Bhuyan, P., Deka, P., Prakash, A., Balachandran, S., & Hoque, R. R. (2018). Chemical characterization and source apportionment of aerosol over mid Brahmaputra Valley, India. Environmental Pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987), 234, 997-1010. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2017.12.009
Bhuyan P, et al. Chemical Characterization and Source Apportionment of Aerosol Over Mid Brahmaputra Valley, India. Environ Pollut. 2018;234:997-1010. PubMed PMID: 29665640.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Chemical characterization and source apportionment of aerosol over mid Brahmaputra Valley, India. AU - Bhuyan,Pranamika, AU - Deka,Pratibha, AU - Prakash,Amit, AU - Balachandran,S, AU - Hoque,Raza Rafiqul, Y1 - 2017/12/21/ PY - 2017/04/05/received PY - 2017/11/15/revised PY - 2017/12/04/accepted PY - 2018/4/19/entrez PY - 2018/4/19/pubmed PY - 2018/7/13/medline KW - Aerosol KW - CMB KW - PCA-MLR KW - PM(10) KW - Source apportionment SP - 997 EP - 1010 JF - Environmental pollution (Barking, Essex : 1987) JO - Environ. Pollut. VL - 234 N2 - Aerosol samples (as PM10, n = 250) were collected from three rural/remote receptor locations in the mid Brahmaputra plain region and were chemically characterized for metals (Al, Fe, Co, Cu, Cr, Cd, Mn, Ni, Pb), ions (Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+, NH4+, F-, Cl-, NO3-, SO42-), and carbon. Vital ratios like NO3-/SO42-, EC/OC, K+/EC, K+/OC, enrichment factors and inter-species correlations were exploited to appreciate possible sources of aerosol. These empirical analyses pointed towards anthropogenic contributions of aerosol, particularly from biomass burning, vehicular emission, and road dust. The chemically characterized concentration data were subsequently fed into two receptor models viz. Principal Component Analysis-Multiple Linear Regression (PCA-MLR) and Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) for apportionment of sources of aerosol. The PCA-MLR estimates identified that the combustion sources together accounted for ∼42% of aerosol and the contribution of secondary formation to be 24%. Road and crustal dusts have been well apportioned by PCA-MLR, which together accounts for ∼26% of the aerosol. The CMB model estimates explained that the combustion sources taken together contributed ∼47% to the aerosol, which includes biomass burning (27%), vehicular emission (13%), coal (1%), kerosene (4%), and petroleum refining (2%). Other major sources that were apportioned were road dust (15%), crustal dust (26%), and construction dust (6%). There are inherent limitations in the source strength estimations because of uncertainty present in the source emission profiles that have been applied to the remote location of India. However, both the models (PCA-MLR and CMB) estimated the contribution of combustion sources to 42 and 47% respectively, which is comparable. SN - 1873-6424 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29665640/Chemical_characterization_and_source_apportionment_of_aerosol_over_mid_Brahmaputra_Valley_India_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0269-7491(17)35026-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -