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Sitting versus standing makes a difference in musculoskeletal discomfort and postural load for surgeons performing vaginal surgery.
Int Urogynecol J. 2019 Feb; 30(2):231-237.IU

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS

We compared musculoskeletal discomfort and postural load among surgeons in sitting and standing positions during vaginal surgery.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Assessment of discomfort and posture of the primary surgeons in both positions was performed at two institutions. The primary outcome was an increase in body discomfort score after surgery as determined from subjective responses using validated tools. The secondary outcome was the percentage of time spent in awkward body postures measured objectively and stratified into awkward postures for neck, trunk, and bilateral shoulder angles. Variables were compared between sitting and standing positions using Fisher's exact test for primary outcomes and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for secondary outcomes.

RESULTS

Data were collected for 24 surgeries from four surgeons in sitting position and nine surgeries from nine surgeons in standing position. The standing surgeons reported a significant increase in discomfort postoperatively for bilateral wrists, thighs, and lower legs compared with the sitting surgeons. The median percentage of time spent in awkward postures was significantly lower for the trunk in the standing versus sitting position (median 0.3% vs 58.8%, p < 0.001) but was significantly higher for both shoulders in the standing versus the sitting position (right shoulder: median 17.8% vs 0.3%, p = 0.003; left shoulder: median 7.4% vs 0.2%, p = 0.003).

CONCLUSION

Surgeons reported more discomfort in when performing vaginal surgery while standing. The postural load was worse for trunk but favorable for bilateral shoulders when seated. Such differences may impact a surgeon's decision to perform vaginal surgery seated rather than standing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Florida, 653-1 W. 8th Street, Jacksonville, FL, 32209, USA. ruchira.26@gmail.com.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University New York Presbyterian, New York, NY, USA.Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USA.Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, University at Buffalo, The State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29671032

Citation

Singh, Ruchira, et al. "Sitting Versus Standing Makes a Difference in Musculoskeletal Discomfort and Postural Load for Surgeons Performing Vaginal Surgery." International Urogynecology Journal, vol. 30, no. 2, 2019, pp. 231-237.
Singh R, Yurteri-Kaplan LA, Morrow MM, et al. Sitting versus standing makes a difference in musculoskeletal discomfort and postural load for surgeons performing vaginal surgery. Int Urogynecol J. 2019;30(2):231-237.
Singh, R., Yurteri-Kaplan, L. A., Morrow, M. M., Weaver, A. L., McGree, M. E., Zhu, X., Paquet, V. L., Gebhart, J. B., & Hallbeck, S. (2019). Sitting versus standing makes a difference in musculoskeletal discomfort and postural load for surgeons performing vaginal surgery. International Urogynecology Journal, 30(2), 231-237. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00192-018-3619-1
Singh R, et al. Sitting Versus Standing Makes a Difference in Musculoskeletal Discomfort and Postural Load for Surgeons Performing Vaginal Surgery. Int Urogynecol J. 2019;30(2):231-237. PubMed PMID: 29671032.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sitting versus standing makes a difference in musculoskeletal discomfort and postural load for surgeons performing vaginal surgery. AU - Singh,Ruchira, AU - Yurteri-Kaplan,Ladin A, AU - Morrow,Melissa M, AU - Weaver,Amy L, AU - McGree,Michaela E, AU - Zhu,Xinhui, AU - Paquet,Victor L, AU - Gebhart,John B, AU - Hallbeck,Susan, Y1 - 2018/04/18/ PY - 2017/10/18/received PY - 2018/03/01/accepted PY - 2018/4/20/pubmed PY - 2019/12/25/medline PY - 2018/4/20/entrez KW - Ergonomics KW - Musculoskeletal discomfort KW - Postural load KW - Vaginal surgery SP - 231 EP - 237 JF - International urogynecology journal JO - Int Urogynecol J VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: We compared musculoskeletal discomfort and postural load among surgeons in sitting and standing positions during vaginal surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Assessment of discomfort and posture of the primary surgeons in both positions was performed at two institutions. The primary outcome was an increase in body discomfort score after surgery as determined from subjective responses using validated tools. The secondary outcome was the percentage of time spent in awkward body postures measured objectively and stratified into awkward postures for neck, trunk, and bilateral shoulder angles. Variables were compared between sitting and standing positions using Fisher's exact test for primary outcomes and Wilcoxon rank-sum test for secondary outcomes. RESULTS: Data were collected for 24 surgeries from four surgeons in sitting position and nine surgeries from nine surgeons in standing position. The standing surgeons reported a significant increase in discomfort postoperatively for bilateral wrists, thighs, and lower legs compared with the sitting surgeons. The median percentage of time spent in awkward postures was significantly lower for the trunk in the standing versus sitting position (median 0.3% vs 58.8%, p < 0.001) but was significantly higher for both shoulders in the standing versus the sitting position (right shoulder: median 17.8% vs 0.3%, p = 0.003; left shoulder: median 7.4% vs 0.2%, p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Surgeons reported more discomfort in when performing vaginal surgery while standing. The postural load was worse for trunk but favorable for bilateral shoulders when seated. Such differences may impact a surgeon's decision to perform vaginal surgery seated rather than standing. SN - 1433-3023 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29671032/Sitting_versus_standing_makes_a_difference_in_musculoskeletal_discomfort_and_postural_load_for_surgeons_performing_vaginal_surgery_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00192-018-3619-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -