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Different Patterns in Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Adaptations in Untrained Individuals Undergoing Nonperiodized and Periodized Strength Regimens.
J Strength Cond Res. 2018 May; 32(5):1238-1244.JS

Abstract

De Souza, EO, Tricoli, V, Rauch, J, Alvarez, MR, Laurentino, G, Aihara, AY, Cardoso, FN, Roschel, H, and Ugrinowitsch, C. Different patterns in muscular strength and hypertrophy adaptations in untrained individuals undergoing non-periodized and periodized strength regimens. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1238-1244, 2018-This study investigated the effects of nonperiodized (NP), traditional periodization (TP), and daily undulating periodization (UP) regimens on muscle strength and hypertrophy in untrained individuals. Thirty-three recreationally active males were randomly divided into 4 groups: NP: n = 8; TP: n = 9; UP: n = 8, and control group (C): n = 8. Experimental groups underwent a 12-week strength training program consisting of 2 sessions per week. Muscle strength and quadriceps cross-sectional area (QCSA) were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks (i.e., mid-point) and after 12 weeks. All training groups increased squat 1RM from pre to 6 weeks mid (NP: 17.02%, TP: 7.7%, and UP: 12.9%, p ≤ 0.002) and pre to post 12 weeks (NP: 19.5%, TP: 17.9%, and UP: 20.4%, p ≤ 0.0001). Traditional periodization was the only group that increased squat 1RM from 6 weeks mid to 12-week period (9.4%, p ≤ 0.008). All training groups increased QCSA from pre to 6 weeks mid (NP: 5.1%, TP: 4.6%, and UP: 5.3%, p ≤ 0.0006) and from pre to post 12 weeks (NP: 8.1%, TP: 11.3%, and UP: 8.7%, p ≤ 0.0001). From 6 weeks mid to 12-week period, TP and UP were the only groups that increased QCSA (6.4 and 3.7%, p ≤ 0.02). There were no significant changes for all dependent variables in C group across the time (p ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, our results demonstrated similar training-induced adaptations after 12 weeks of NP and periodized regimens. However, our findings suggest that in the latter half of the study (i.e., after the initial 6 weeks), the periodized regimens elicited greater rates of muscular adaptations compared with NP regimens. Strength coaches and practitioners should be aware that periodized regimens might be advantageous at latter stages of training even for untrained individuals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Science and Human Performance, University of Tampa, Tampa, Florida.Department of Physical Education and Sport, Laboratory of Adaptations to Strength Training, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Health Science and Human Performance, University of Tampa, Tampa, Florida.Department of Health Science and Human Performance, University of Tampa, Tampa, Florida.Department of Health Science and Human Performance, University of Tampa, Tampa, Florida.America's Diagnostic S/A, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.America's Diagnostic S/A, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Physical Education and Sport, Laboratory of Adaptations to Strength Training, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Applied Physiology and Nutrition Research Group, Department of Physical Education and Sport, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.Department of Physical Education and Sport, Laboratory of Adaptations to Strength Training, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

29683914

Citation

De Souza, Eduardo O., et al. "Different Patterns in Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Adaptations in Untrained Individuals Undergoing Nonperiodized and Periodized Strength Regimens." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 32, no. 5, 2018, pp. 1238-1244.
De Souza EO, Tricoli V, Rauch J, et al. Different Patterns in Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Adaptations in Untrained Individuals Undergoing Nonperiodized and Periodized Strength Regimens. J Strength Cond Res. 2018;32(5):1238-1244.
De Souza, E. O., Tricoli, V., Rauch, J., Alvarez, M. R., Laurentino, G., Aihara, A. Y., Cardoso, F. N., Roschel, H., & Ugrinowitsch, C. (2018). Different Patterns in Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Adaptations in Untrained Individuals Undergoing Nonperiodized and Periodized Strength Regimens. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 32(5), 1238-1244. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000002482
De Souza EO, et al. Different Patterns in Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Adaptations in Untrained Individuals Undergoing Nonperiodized and Periodized Strength Regimens. J Strength Cond Res. 2018;32(5):1238-1244. PubMed PMID: 29683914.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Different Patterns in Muscular Strength and Hypertrophy Adaptations in Untrained Individuals Undergoing Nonperiodized and Periodized Strength Regimens. AU - De Souza,Eduardo O, AU - Tricoli,Valmor, AU - Rauch,Jacob, AU - Alvarez,Michael R, AU - Laurentino,Gilberto, AU - Aihara,André Y, AU - Cardoso,Fabiano N, AU - Roschel,Hamilton, AU - Ugrinowitsch,Carlos, PY - 2018/4/24/entrez PY - 2018/4/24/pubmed PY - 2018/9/5/medline SP - 1238 EP - 1244 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - De Souza, EO, Tricoli, V, Rauch, J, Alvarez, MR, Laurentino, G, Aihara, AY, Cardoso, FN, Roschel, H, and Ugrinowitsch, C. Different patterns in muscular strength and hypertrophy adaptations in untrained individuals undergoing non-periodized and periodized strength regimens. J Strength Cond Res 32(5): 1238-1244, 2018-This study investigated the effects of nonperiodized (NP), traditional periodization (TP), and daily undulating periodization (UP) regimens on muscle strength and hypertrophy in untrained individuals. Thirty-three recreationally active males were randomly divided into 4 groups: NP: n = 8; TP: n = 9; UP: n = 8, and control group (C): n = 8. Experimental groups underwent a 12-week strength training program consisting of 2 sessions per week. Muscle strength and quadriceps cross-sectional area (QCSA) were assessed at baseline, 6 weeks (i.e., mid-point) and after 12 weeks. All training groups increased squat 1RM from pre to 6 weeks mid (NP: 17.02%, TP: 7.7%, and UP: 12.9%, p ≤ 0.002) and pre to post 12 weeks (NP: 19.5%, TP: 17.9%, and UP: 20.4%, p ≤ 0.0001). Traditional periodization was the only group that increased squat 1RM from 6 weeks mid to 12-week period (9.4%, p ≤ 0.008). All training groups increased QCSA from pre to 6 weeks mid (NP: 5.1%, TP: 4.6%, and UP: 5.3%, p ≤ 0.0006) and from pre to post 12 weeks (NP: 8.1%, TP: 11.3%, and UP: 8.7%, p ≤ 0.0001). From 6 weeks mid to 12-week period, TP and UP were the only groups that increased QCSA (6.4 and 3.7%, p ≤ 0.02). There were no significant changes for all dependent variables in C group across the time (p ≥ 0.05). In conclusion, our results demonstrated similar training-induced adaptations after 12 weeks of NP and periodized regimens. However, our findings suggest that in the latter half of the study (i.e., after the initial 6 weeks), the periodized regimens elicited greater rates of muscular adaptations compared with NP regimens. Strength coaches and practitioners should be aware that periodized regimens might be advantageous at latter stages of training even for untrained individuals. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/29683914/Different_Patterns_in_Muscular_Strength_and_Hypertrophy_Adaptations_in_Untrained_Individuals_Undergoing_Nonperiodized_and_Periodized_Strength_Regimens_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000002482 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -